17
   

The Case of the Purloined Squirrel Corpse

 
 
Robert Gentel
 
  1  
Reply Wed 7 Oct, 2009 11:15 am
@sozobe,
sozobe wrote:
That's a chipmunk! About a third of the size of a squirrel.


I know, but a cat can easily drag off a squirrel and I think that it's the most likely culprit in a suburban setting.
BorisKitten
 
  1  
Reply Wed 7 Oct, 2009 06:32 pm
@Robert Gentel,
Sure, my cats have brought us headless squirrels on many occasions.

But would a cat, as Soz says, pick up and eat a dead squirrel? Hmmm...

Now, a Dog, sure. Though a dog might wait a bit and roll in the horrid dead smell first, just for, you know, Fun.

Anyone else mentioned Vultures? Don't know how many live Up North, but in downtown Tampa they roost on the tops of the tallest buildings. They'd have no problem picking up a squirrel.

Or a Raven? You have them?
Robert Gentel
 
  1  
Reply Wed 7 Oct, 2009 08:23 pm
@BorisKitten,
BorisKitten wrote:
But would a cat, as Soz says, pick up and eat a dead squirrel? Hmmm...


There have been famous cases of feline necrophagy, such as that of cats that begin to eat their dead owners, so I suspect that they aren't above scavenging carrion in all cases. Don't know who's the culprit here though.
roger
 
  1  
Reply Wed 7 Oct, 2009 08:49 pm
@Robert Gentel,
Supposedly strict vegitarians like prairie dogs have been observed eating dead bodies of animals. I don't know if it ever got written up in the literature.
0 Replies
 
BorisKitten
 
  1  
Reply Thu 8 Oct, 2009 11:45 am
@Robert Gentel,
Quote:
There have been famous cases of feline necrophagy, such as that of cats that begin to eat their dead owners...

Oh, damn! TMI! TMI!
Swimpy
 
  1  
Reply Fri 9 Oct, 2009 07:32 pm
A possible explanation

http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=112894124
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Fri 9 Oct, 2009 07:44 pm
I once had a cat that began leaving a daily dead squirrel on the doorstep. I finally stopped it by giving him to somebody that could keep him without endangering more squirrels.
0 Replies
 
dlowan
 
  1  
Reply Fri 9 Oct, 2009 09:03 pm
@BorisKitten,
BorisKitten wrote:

Quote:
There have been famous cases of feline necrophagy, such as that of cats that begin to eat their dead owners...

Oh, damn! TMI! TMI!


Only sensible thing to do.

Since nature has not endowed them with the means to use a telephone to call for help, nor open cupboards and cans.

sozobe
 
  1  
Reply Sat 10 Oct, 2009 09:19 am
@dlowan,
Right, that's the thing -- cats eat dead humans 'cause they're stuck with them and have no other food source. The cats around here are all fed (there are bowls of food outside for strays) and there are plenty of live food sources (mourning doves, especially -- a neighbor has a ground bird feeder that another neighbor calls a "cat feeder"). I'm not sure that, given all of these appealing food sources, a dead squirrel would rank high enough to go to the trouble of wrangling it. If it were the only food source in a locked enclosure, that'd be something else...

Rockhead's post made a big impression on me because the UN-deadness of the eyes was something that I took away from the encounter. They seemed too shiny, too alive. I thought the bugs were a dealbreaker there (live eyes don't have bugs swarming on them) but evidently not.
0 Replies
 
sozobe
 
  1  
Reply Sat 10 Oct, 2009 09:21 am
@Swimpy,
That's cool!
0 Replies
 
 

Related Topics

Odd Moments in the Animal Kingdom - Discussion by Robert Gentel
Beautiful Animals - Discussion by Roberta
Windmills Killing Eagles - Discussion by gungasnake
Nature - Do you crave more? - Discussion by Foofie
The Lion's Edge - Question by gungasnake
BATS DYING FROM WHITE MOLD SYNDROME - Discussion by farmerman
Rat Problem: Rats Smarter than Me - Discussion by edgarblythe
 
Copyright © 2019 MadLab, LLC :: Terms of Service :: Privacy Policy :: Page generated in 0.05 seconds on 10/17/2019 at 09:46:04