2
   

The Beggining of the Visa System (Permission for entering in a country)

 
 
Reply Tue 29 Sep, 2009 01:24 am
I was wondering if anyone has the historic perspective about the visa system ( Seal or permission on th passport used for entering any country). Please tell me when it started and what was the first country to adopt the visa system? I will greatly appreciate your informative responsive. Thanks
  • Topic Stats
  • Top Replies
  • Link to this Topic
Type: Question • Score: 2 • Views: 8,031 • Replies: 5
No top replies

 
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Tue 29 Sep, 2009 07:43 am
@findingsolutions,
findingsolutions wrote:

I was wondering if anyone has the historic perspective about the visa system ( Seal or permission on th passport used for entering any country). Please tell me when it started and what was the first country to adopt the visa system? I will greatly appreciate your informative responsive. Thanks


I suppose that the medieval "passport letters" were both, a passport and a kind of visa. In German countries, especially after the 'peasant revolt', those 'letters' were additionally 'visaed' for certain countries/states.

From 1813 onwards, all foreigners who wanted to visit Prussia and/or one of its states needed a visa.
0 Replies
 
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Tue 29 Sep, 2009 07:51 am
@findingsolutions,
http://www.life123.com/sports/vacations-vacation-planning/passport/little-blue-historical-the-history-of-the-passport.shtml

Quote:
Passports, in the form of official travel documents, have been around since biblical times, but it was in the 15th century that the first true passport was born, at the behest of Henry V, of England. The document was designed to identify its holder as English wherever he or she traveled and was one means to obtain passage into a walled city while travelling abroad. In fact, many scholars believe that the word “passport” refers to the “porte,” or doorway, in city walls. Henry’s passport differed from earlier examples, which merely listed cities that a traveler could enter.
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Tue 29 Sep, 2009 09:23 am
@ehBeth,
On continental Europe these 'travel documents' must have been in use earlier - for instance, in the 1470's, the city of Berne (Switzerland) issued about 50 of such 'passport letters' a day (actually during night, since that was done being at war).

Already in 1551 there was a "Reichspolizieverordnung" (police instructions for the Roman Empire of German Nation) regulation the "passports".

There are notes by several travellers from the 14th/15th century what 'papers' they had to show where to get a 'free pass'.
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Tue 29 Sep, 2009 09:31 am
@Walter Hinteler,
Walter Hinteler wrote:

On continental Europe these 'travel documents' must have been in use earlier -.


earlier than Biblical times?
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Tue 29 Sep, 2009 09:46 am
@ehBeth,
No, 13th/14th century (whyt I was referring at) - I've seen that mentioned somewhere, but don't recall where (and as far as I remember, some documents from that period are even online - I'll check that when I'm at my own computer again).

Yes (what I didn't look up), the Romans had something like that, too.
0 Replies
 
 

Related Topics

 
  1. Forums
  2. » The Beggining of the Visa System (Permission for entering in a country)
Copyright © 2019 MadLab, LLC :: Terms of Service :: Privacy Policy :: Page generated in 0.03 seconds on 07/23/2019 at 07:07:27