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Substitute Teachers Not Seen Eye to Eye

 
 
Reply Sat 8 Aug, 2009 11:34 am
Why are substitute teachers not seen eye to eye in the school system? In New York City, sub teachers are treated badly at every school by regular teachers, main office staff and students. Why is this the case?
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Type: Discussion • Score: 3 • Views: 5,112 • Replies: 12
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Merry Andrew
 
  2  
Reply Sat 8 Aug, 2009 01:13 pm
@nycfunction,
Quote:
Why are substitute teachers not seen eye to eye in the school system?


I have no idea what that phrase "eye to eye" means.

As for your contention that subs "are treated badly," I'm not quite sure what you mean by that either. The kids, of course, will take advantage of a substitute teacher and treat him/her "badly." Didn't you do that when you were a student? I did. I mean, you know that this guy is here today, gone tomorrow or the day after. You're not going to be on your best behavior the way you would be with the regular teacher. Why? Because you can get away with it, that's why.

As for regular teachers and office staff, the situation is somewhat similar. You're not part of the team nor will you ever be. You're just passing through.

I've substitute taught, so I know what you're talking about. The only difference between you and me is that I never expected anything different. Get over it.
aidan
 
  0  
Reply Sat 8 Aug, 2009 01:25 pm
@Merry Andrew,
Quote:
The kids, of course, will take advantage of a substitute teacher and treat him/her "badly."

Not me (when I was a kid). I remember when I was in junior highschool and there was this sub named Mr. Hruska (what kind of name is that?) - anyway- I'd be sitting in English or French or Social Studies ready for the same old, same old - and he'd come walking through the door - and it would just be amazing...I'd get really excited suddenly for English or French or Social Studies (he was really cute).

But seriously, I think a short-term sub (someone just in the class for the day) should just opt for discussions (in jr. or sr. highschool) somewhere along the continuum of the subject matter at hand, because MA's right - otherwise the kids will just make the sub's life miserable using every diversion and distraction they can think of to make the time-frame disappear in the most amusing and least productive way possible.
Of course, if you're a long term sub (maternity leave or something like that) that's not cool - you have to somehow get them to buckle down and learn something so the eight or nine weeks is not a total loss.

In my opinion - subbing is harder than having your own class - you have to use someone else's plans and slot yourself into someone else's niche. I subbed one time for someone and after that I figured I'd rather mow lawns or something. Too much aggravation and not very much tangible reward, monetary or otherwise.
Froth
 
  0  
Reply Mon 10 Aug, 2009 07:25 am
@aidan,
Quote:
and there was this sub named Mr. Hruska (what kind of name is that?)

Czechoslovakian
aidan
 
  2  
Reply Mon 10 Aug, 2009 07:31 am
@Froth,
I thought so - he was very Eastern European looking and very handsome.
0 Replies
 
nycfunction
 
  1  
Reply Mon 10 Aug, 2009 04:50 pm
@Merry Andrew,
Merry Andrew wrote:

Quote:
Why are substitute teachers not seen eye to eye in the school system?


I have no idea what that phrase "eye to eye" means.

As for your contention that subs "are treated badly," I'm not quite sure what you mean by that either. The kids, of course, will take advantage of a substitute teacher and treat him/her "badly." Didn't you do that when you were a student? I did. I mean, you know that this guy is here today, gone tomorrow or the day after. You're not going to be on your best behavior the way you would be with the regular teacher. Why? Because you can get away with it, that's why.

As for regular teachers and office staff, the situation is somewhat similar. You're not part of the team nor will you ever be. You're just passing through.

I've substitute taught, so I know what you're talking about. The only difference between you and me is that I never expected anything different. Get over it.


I expect respect regardless of title or job position. People should be treated with respect just for being people. By the way, I never mistreated a sub teacher. I come from a Christian home where biblical values and respect are taught all the time.
nycfunction
 
  1  
Reply Mon 10 Aug, 2009 04:53 pm
@aidan,
aidan wrote:

Quote:
The kids, of course, will take advantage of a substitute teacher and treat him/her "badly."

Not me (when I was a kid). I remember when I was in junior highschool and there was this sub named Mr. Hruska (what kind of name is that?) - anyway- I'd be sitting in English or French or Social Studies ready for the same old, same old - and he'd come walking through the door - and it would just be amazing...I'd get really excited suddenly for English or French or Social Studies (he was really cute).

But seriously, I think a short-term sub (someone just in the class for the day) should just opt for discussions (in jr. or sr. highschool) somewhere along the continuum of the subject matter at hand, because MA's right - otherwise the kids will just make the sub's life miserable using every diversion and distraction they can think of to make the time-frame disappear in the most amusing and least productive way possible.
Of course, if you're a long term sub (maternity leave or something like that) that's not cool - you have to somehow get them to buckle down and learn something so the eight or nine weeks is not a total loss.

In my opinion - subbing is harder than having your own class - you have to use someone else's plans and slot yourself into someone else's niche. I subbed one time for someone and after that I figured I'd rather mow lawns or something. Too much aggravation and not very much tangible reward, monetary or otherwise.


After subbing for 8 years, I've learned that subbing is harder than teaching your own class. Like you said: "...subbing is harder than having your own class - you have to use someone else's plans and slot yourself into someone else's niche."
snaggletooth77
 
  1  
Reply Mon 20 Sep, 2010 06:49 pm
@nycfunction,
yes, Substitute Teachers are treated badly by students, staff and administration, especially.
I already know if administration does not like you, don't do anything wrong that gives them reason to file reports to human resources, because at that point administration will go out of their way to invent lies such that it may prevent you from returning to sub at the school. It is criminal that schools can operate in such a corrupt manner, and the job does not pay sufficiently to anyone with any self respect to endure such abuse. Substitute teaching f'n sucks...
leisa
 
  1  
Reply Sat 29 Jan, 2011 08:36 am
@nycfunction,
Especially for the upper level grades, if you do not have the knowledge, credentials and required certification for what you are teaching, why would you be expected to be treated as if you do? You are performing a very needed duty as an "adult babysitter", but that's pretty much it, in most cases. If you are bouncing around from subject to subject and classroom to classroom, you are obviously not professionally trained and licensed in these areas. As you know, all states in the US have specific and stringent credentialing requirements for their teachers, (required by law). There is a good reason for this! The students will recognize that you are not the "same caliber" as their regular classroom teacher, and will behave accordingly. Not that they shouldn't be courteous and polite, of course.

If you DO have the same credentials as the regular classroom teacher, you should look for a long-term sub position in your area of expertise. You may be able to negotiate your "sub pay" in a case like this, due to your background and abilities. You will also have your foot in the door if a permanent full time position becomes available at your school or one that is nearby. The school will certainly offer you a letter of recommendation if you are a valuable teacher. You should also ask the principal or department head to sit in on one of your classes if this is the case.












0 Replies
 
norawash
 
  1  
Reply Sat 15 Jun, 2013 07:19 am
@nycfunction,
Because substitute teachers are considered to be below the regular teachers, they make less money, and in NC no benefits, so teachers are discriminating because they know that substitute teachers have no support from HR. Teachers and staff who are discriminative are bad examples to students, their actions teach students to be unethical. Parents send their children to school to grow and develop. They do not what their child to see teacher’s, staff and administration bullying, saying bad thing about each other, treating substitutes unethical, saying bad thing about their substitute teachers or fighting among each other. I’m a substitute teacher and I’ve seen it all and substitute teachers are rude, they will run out of class, have no rights, their opinions are overlooked. I’m learn just don’t say anything, substitutes are told constantly that are not part of the staff. Our children are the ones who are really suffering they have perceived these improper things, and they really don’t understand why their leaders are acting so unprofessional. My opinions are too have book sense is a wonderful thing but common sense and being ethical needs to connect.
0 Replies
 
norawash
 
  1  
Reply Sat 15 Jun, 2013 07:59 am
@nycfunction,
Its people thinking like this is the reason why substitutes teachers have to endure bad treatment, the I don't care unless it's happening to me, mode what happened to compassion for people. You should never have get over, wanted to be treated civil
0 Replies
 
norawash
 
  1  
Reply Sat 15 Jun, 2013 08:05 am
@snaggletooth77,
I agree with you, substitue teachers have to much to endure, they are treated uncivil and until congress or some one stand up and say enough is enough subsitute teachers will always have to endure being treated unethical.
mrsdj1
 
  1  
Reply Thu 6 Sep, 2018 03:32 pm
@norawash,
Respect is not given to the subs who are so willing to stand and deliver. I have seen many poor sub role models, and then there is my peer group. We are professional, educated teachers or trainers or content experts. When you think of them as babysitters, you are so wrong and not using your sub resource very well. Of course, if a sub cannot teach a subject, they should not opt for that choice. It is a failure and report waiting to happen.

It takes years of subbing to get the following and respect.

However, it is very rude and condescending to be in a teacher's lounge and the social behavioral response to you is similar to having a disease on your face. No hello, welcome, thanks for being here, may I help you, how is it going. It is total indifference. Yes the sub is not of your "pack", but being kind is more than the slogans teachers post during "kindness" month.

Of course if they are talking to you it is to see if you can sub for them.


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