oolongteasup
 
  -1  
Reply Mon 27 Jul, 2009 11:18 pm
@jespah,
Yeah right just updating the resume.

Please post this type of material in the humour section next time.

Send your cv to the two best executive placement agencies and prepare yourself to kill at interview. Easy on the decolletage this time.
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Tue 28 Jul, 2009 12:58 am
Nods to Rosbourne, useful post.
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Tue 28 Jul, 2009 01:01 am
@oolongteasup,
Eh?

0 Replies
 
OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Tue 28 Jul, 2009 01:28 am
What is most important is to say something or things
that will make your decision maker believe that he will be better off WITH u.

Any singular, unique assets that u have will be a plus.

Try to think of things that will make him LIKE u.
Maybe say something to indicate that u r highly motivated.

It might be worth your while to research your target
to assess its needs and probable desires n tailor it thereto.





David
jespah
 
  1  
Reply Tue 28 Jul, 2009 03:54 am
@oolongteasup,
I beg your pardon?
0 Replies
 
jespah
 
  1  
Reply Tue 28 Jul, 2009 03:55 am
@OmSigDAVID,
Exactly - the more tailoring, the better, I've found. Thanks, David.
OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Tue 28 Jul, 2009 07:03 am

This is not directed toward u, Jespah:

Minimally, it shoud be typed, or better: have it professionally printed,
to look nice on good quality paper. I once saw a lad
(who, admittedly, was not in his right mind)
writing it out by hand, to be thusly presented to a personnel mgr.
0 Replies
 
ehBeth
 
  2  
Reply Tue 28 Jul, 2009 10:27 am
@jespah,
Back in the day, we used to call it the sniper approach v the shotgun approach. Dedicated resumes are so much easier to prepare these days.
0 Replies
 
OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Sat 26 Feb, 2011 04:40 am
@jespah,
jespah wrote:
What would you say to me? Or to someone just starting out?
Or to someone further along in their career than I am?

What works for you?
Show attention to precision of logic and to accuracy of detail, e.g.:
"Or to someone further along in his or her career than I am?"

When I was hiring for my law firm,
I kept an eye out for that as manifested in the resume.





David
jespah
 
  1  
Reply Sat 26 Feb, 2011 07:59 am
@OmSigDAVID,
True - and I do use that sort of detail in my resumes. Thanks for pointing that out.
0 Replies
 
CalamityJane
 
  2  
Reply Sat 26 Feb, 2011 09:31 pm
I am just reading Money Magazine and they have some great pointers towards today's resumes that don't make you look "old".

- email and cell phone # (without identifying it) is very common now.

- skip virtual meaningless word phrases such as innovative, extensive, motivated, result-oriented, dynamic, team player, faced-paced, problem solver. Instead use keywords from the job ad itself.

- unless it's a Fortune 500 company, add a few words as to what the previous
employer did, for example "international manufacturer of pencils". Chances are that your interviewer is younger than you and might not have the industry knowledge.

- don't use an outdated format. Only list years, not months on the right
after your job title. List only specialized software and technology skills.
Don't list run-of-the-mill skills like Excel, MS Word, power point etc.

- expanding your resume to two or three pages is perfectly acceptable
for someone in their 40s and 50s. However, list experience as 15 + years
instead of something like 28 years. You can't fool them but it doesn't
look too "over the hill". You also can leave your grad days off,
it's perfectly sufficient to list what degree you have and from where.

- private activities such as athletics (cycling etc.) shows vivacity, as do
charity activities where you give back to the community, like fundraisers
organized by you. Religious affiliation and Sunday choirs shouldn't
be part of it, although some employers see integrity in it (I personally would not mention it).

- last not least: it's never what you want from the company. What does
the company care? Always start with a summary what you can contribute
to the company, perhaps include a list of your expertise in new client
development or financial marketing projections for the company.

I thought those were excellent points made.


ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Sat 26 Feb, 2011 10:00 pm
@CalamityJane,
Time for me to mention Marty Poirier's resume.

I looked it up when I was hired at age 42 (at the mid of land arch schooling after I'd quit the medical lab, 2nd career so called) as the all around helper. This was an odd position. I was paid pebbles per week. The designers did not frown at me, were helpful (I wasn't bad in school). The head of the company sent me out to photo shoot a pre-park situation and, as I heard later, said, who is this woman, these are good..

I made ******* coffee. (I'd run labs before). I filed. I drew - which was fun, I drew six foot long presentation drawings very fast.

Anyway, as part of my job of helping the secretary (the name then and she was mildly officious) file, I ran into the resume thicket.
Ah, so.

I found some neat ones, but Marty's was best. He used markers and graphics for a slap shot resume, the kind of thing I think all of you would just toss.
He was up, far up, there in the company when I met him and did well on his own later, far as I know. I think he was the mind behind the Getty gardens, as I saw his name on serious plans backing up whatsisname, Irwin.


Submissions may vary. In the case of design firms, those may have differing biases.
CalamityJane
 
  1  
Reply Sat 26 Feb, 2011 10:16 pm
@ossobuco,
osso, in the design world all bets are off! The most unusual resumes are almost a prerequisite.
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Sun 27 Feb, 2011 12:07 am
@CalamityJane,
I don't know how it is now, but someone like Marty was gold.
0 Replies
 
stevencruiser
 
  -2  
Reply Wed 28 Dec, 2011 07:30 am
@Shapeless,
I am with you my dear.The email should show your professional attitude.
0 Replies
 
stevencruiser
 
  -2  
Reply Wed 1 Feb, 2012 10:31 pm
Resume length depends upon your experience and skills. If you have worked with several organizations then certainly your resume will go long. In the resume,it is expected to mention all about your work experience if it is relevant to the current position for which,you have applied.
0 Replies
 
sandydsouza
 
  -1  
Reply Fri 10 Feb, 2012 03:46 am
@jespah,
Resume is promotional document that is used for job search.So one shouldn't take any risk in designing resume. what i would like to suggest you that it is better to prefer resume experts.
0 Replies
 
amygarside
 
  2  
Reply Fri 14 Sep, 2012 05:04 am
Enjoyed reading this thread. Helped me know a thing or two about resumes. Thanks!
0 Replies
 
 

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