27
   

It's the Fourth of July. Say Something Good About America.

 
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Sat 4 Jul, 2009 06:58 pm
@aidan,
California mexican food is not as varied as Mexican mexican food, but almost. There are specialty cafes from all regions and many parts of regions of Mexico. The stuff in the chain restaurants, well, it's a start if you've never had mexican food, but mostly popular dreck. As an aside, I've been ranting lately about Texas style flour tortillas, gack, versus Sonoran.

Chinese food in California can run from terrible to accomplished, all in storefronts or in grand emporia. So, not to go on about all the different kinds of food in the US (should I start with BBQ?) - we have a complex development of food, even while having a whole bunch of questionable practices.

What I most prize is freedom to say what I think.
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Sat 4 Jul, 2009 07:24 pm
@ossobuco,
I am lucky to have been born in the US, and pretty much appreciate that, in regard to other places with much horror going on, not that we haven't had that, so I think what I like is a trend toward growth from us, when that happens. I've a thousand or more qualms, but I'm glad we're independent, and I do mean 'we'.
0 Replies
 
JTT
 
  1  
Reply Sat 4 Jul, 2009 07:57 pm
@Rockhead,
Quote:
or the smokies rising out of a morning fog.


You barbeque them for breakfast!
0 Replies
 
Bi-Polar Bear
 
  2  
Reply Sat 4 Jul, 2009 08:04 pm
the unquenchable belief that things will work out...
0 Replies
 
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Sun 5 Jul, 2009 04:43 am
OUR FOOTBALL KICKS ASS!!!
hingehead
 
  1  
Reply Sun 5 Jul, 2009 05:29 pm
@farmerman,
Then shouldn't it be called 'FootAss'?

Heh.

We had about 4000 US naval and marine servicepeople in Cairns for the last week (we even put on fireworks for the 4th July). Our local papers and police are gushing about the fantastic behaviour and cooperation of the US personnel.

And of course local businesses appreciate the economic stimulus (particularly the 'working ladies' who flew up from Sydney because the local supply couldn't cope).
0 Replies
 
margo
 
  1  
Reply Sun 5 Jul, 2009 10:01 pm
@solipsister,
Quote:
The love of field and coppice,
Of green and shaded Lanes,
Of ordered woods and gardens,
Is running in your veins;
Strong love of grey-blue distance,
Brown streams and soft, dim skies -
I know but cannot share it,
My love is otherwise.


Solipster - I saw that - but the Murricans won't pick it up! Twisted Evil

MerryAndrew - absolute crap, I'm sorry to say!
Merry Andrew
 
  1  
Reply Sun 5 Jul, 2009 10:20 pm
@margo,
Quote:
MerryAndrew - absolute crap, I'm sorry to say!


You could well be right, Ms. Margo. I must admit I've never been to Australia, though I have some quite close blood relatives dwelling there.
margo
 
  1  
Reply Mon 6 Jul, 2009 09:07 pm
@Merry Andrew,
Quote:
I have some quite close blood relatives dwelling there.


We LIVE here - not just dwell....and we like it here.

When we say "Only in America" - don't ever think of it as a compliment!
0 Replies
 
panzade
 
  1  
Reply Mon 6 Jul, 2009 09:15 pm
@margo,
Quote:
Solipster - I saw that - but the Murricans won't pick it up! Twisted Evil


yes, yes,.. Dorothea Mackellar...but, say something nice about the US you devilish antipods Very Happy
0 Replies
 
Robert Gentel
 
  2  
Reply Mon 6 Jul, 2009 09:33 pm
@Merry Andrew,
Merry Andrew wrote:
This country is a long, long way from being perfect. But, as countries go, it's waaay ahead of whoever happens to be in second place.


Everywhere I go, most people think this way about their country. When I say that everyone can't possibly be right they tend to agree, all those other countries can't be right (theirs is obviously the best, you see, and those other folks are just biased by their understandable patriotism).
OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Mon 6 Jul, 2009 09:54 pm

After the English were thrown out, we were free to do what we wanted.

The Founders began by CRIPPLING government 37 different ways
as to its domestic powers, in the Bill of Rights alone,
knowing that individual freedom and government power are INVERSELY PROPORTIONAL.





David
hingehead
 
  1  
Reply Mon 6 Jul, 2009 09:59 pm
@Robert Gentel,
Yep Robert, it was indeed a pointless thing to say, being as it is completely subjective without even a 'why'. Even those of us who have lived copious amounts of time in different countries cannot speak for all residents of those same countries.

But mostly it's been nice to read about the things merkins like about their country, not withstanding the odd uppity Canadian or antipodean.

Come Australia Day (26 January) I wonder what we'd say we liked about our country.
hingehead
 
  1  
Reply Mon 6 Jul, 2009 10:00 pm
@OmSigDAVID,
Your understanding of your own history is depressingly schoolboyish David.
roger
 
  1  
Reply Mon 6 Jul, 2009 10:06 pm
@hingehead,
Even Americans know about merkins.
0 Replies
 
OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Mon 6 Jul, 2009 10:07 pm
@hingehead,
hingehead wrote:

Your understanding of your own history is depressingly schoolboyish David.
Your comment, as set forth, is without value.
If u wish to add value to it, then u need to specify your complaints.


As it stands, it is little more than a nasty grunt from a snarling dog.





David
Robert Gentel
 
  2  
Reply Mon 6 Jul, 2009 11:06 pm
Short/random list of things I like about America:

1) Lawns. I know it's bad for the environment but they are beautiful. So many countries don't have open lawns.

2) Food. The range of food available in America is almost unrivaled. Even if it virtually guarantees that you'll be fatter in America than anywhere else it's a pretty compelling plus to life in America.

3) Sense of justice. Its downside is the litigious nature but the sense of fairness and justice is refreshing. In many other places you get screwed and you are out of luck. I like that in America there is a strong sense of fairness and justice.

4) Culture. America is often reviled for the negative aspects of its culture (overtly commercial, less artistic) but it's the greatest cultural power of all time, and it's contributions to movies, music, television and just about any form of entertainment are unrivaled.

5) Democracy (and human rights to a lesser extent). Many Americans think America invented freedom and democracy, or that America is virtually responsible for freedom everywhere but despite that delusion the fact remains that there are only few nations on earth with the long history of promoting (most of the time) these values as effectively as the United States has. While the world savior mantle might not be accurate America really has served as a leader in promoting free democracy.

6) Technology and science. There are only a couple of countries in the world that contribute to the world of technology and science at the level that the US does. The American contributions to the internet are significant and this may well be the most transformative technology of the modern era.

7) Global security. As often as I disagree with the American use of military force (which is so frequently self-serving) there are times it's used for good, and on the balance of things I think America's military history leans towards being a net positive to the world. There aren't a lot of other nations that can claim even that much without being very minor contributors to global security. And despite America's recent unwillingness to forward global rule of law its contributions to such things as the UN are very significant and the relative security of the modern era owes a lot the US military might (even in many cases when it goes unused except for as a deterrent).

8) Comedy. This might seem like it should go under entertainment, but it deserves its own item. America is responsible for making more people laugh than any other nation. As is often said, a country that gave us The Simpsons can't be all bad.

9) Individualism. I have respect for other more collectivist cultures as well, but I find myself better suited for individualist cultures. There are downsides to it, but the upsides, like more freedom of expression, are pretty cool.

10) Size and wealth. What really sets America apart from everywhere else I've lived is the sheer size of its economy. I've lived in freer nations, I've lived in places with the same general values and culture. But there's nothing that comes close to the scale of the American economy. It's often said that America is a "land of opportunity" because it is a meritocracy, and while that is certainly true (see #3) the bigger factor is that practically half the world's wealth is in America which is where the "opportunity" part derives most of its truth from.

There are less than a dozen nations on earth where I would want my kid to grow up. When all is said and done the biggest factor is the chances my kid would have to succeed in life and America is round the top of that list. In many other countries it doesn't matter if a kid is smart and works hard. There just isn't enough wealth to have good chances of success (as defined by survival, I'm not talking about being rich). People who live in first world countries all their lives don't fully appreciate it, but in most of the world there isn't enough wealth circulating to guarantee that you will be rewarded with survival for your efforts. It takes a special sort of person to actually starve in America. It's harder to be poor (by global standards) in America than it is to be rich almost anywhere else and if I wanted to give my kid a good odds for survival America isn't half bad as far as opportunity goes.
Foxfyre
 
  1  
Reply Mon 6 Jul, 2009 11:30 pm
@Robert Gentel,
Nobody could ask for higher praise than that Robert and I, as a patriotic American all too painfully aware of America's flaws, thank you for an honest appraisal. America has so much to commend it and so much to condemn it, but bottom line, there are few places on Earth where an average person can be as free, can have as many unrestricted opportunities, can be as personally safe, and aspire to be as personally prosperous as he or she can be in America. It was a noble experiment that shows some frayed edges and a few rust spots here and there these days, but but I don't believe it is over yet.
hingehead
 
  1  
Reply Mon 6 Jul, 2009 11:34 pm
@OmSigDAVID,
Oooh, I must have hit a nerve, you didn't do any weird font effects.

snarl snarl.
0 Replies
 
Merry Andrew
 
  2  
Reply Tue 7 Jul, 2009 01:02 am
OK. I admit it. I put my foot in my mouth by making a baseless, bland statement like that. Mea culpa. (And, no, that is not irony nor am I being sarcastic; I'm quite sincere.) I know what you mean, Robert, about people in all countries feeling that way. I've lived in other countries. In fact, you may recall that I was born in another country. The fact that I was all of eleven years old before I even set foot in America may have something to do with the way I feel about this country. If any excuse for my possibly inexcusable outburst is needed, that's my excuse.
 

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