12
   

Vanishing Card Games

 
 
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Tue 16 Jun, 2009 11:56 am
Probably the same--it's the uniform.
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Tue 16 Jun, 2009 12:08 pm
The men in the first photograph are probably officers or non-commissioned officers--their hats have brims on them. The men in the second photograph are undoubtedly private soldiers--their hats have no brims. In the first photograph, i'd speculate that it might be 1915 or 1916. Two of them have medal ribbons in their button holes, which they would not have acquired in peace time. One of them is wearing puttees, which became favored due to trench warfare.
panzade
 
  1  
Reply Tue 16 Jun, 2009 12:10 pm
@Setanta,
thanks boss
0 Replies
 
joefromchicago
 
  1  
Reply Tue 16 Jun, 2009 12:12 pm
@Setanta,
Sharply observed. I would agree.
0 Replies
 
George
 
  1  
Reply Tue 16 Jun, 2009 12:17 pm
Back the time B.C. (Before Children) the Lovely Bride and I would meet with
another couple and play hearts for hours on end. Once a summer we would
take a cruise around Lake Winnipesaukee on the Mt. Washington, drinking,
playing Hearts, and watching the shoreline go by. That was fun.
0 Replies
 
DrewDad
 
  1  
Reply Tue 16 Jun, 2009 12:39 pm
A vanished card game I first learned of from the Hornblower series: Whist.
jespah
 
  1  
Reply Tue 16 Jun, 2009 12:59 pm
I remember playing canasta when I was a kid (no idea how to play it now), plus gin rummy, 500 rummy and a lot of double solitaire and a variant called touch. I'm pretty sure my brother still remembers how to play touch, dunno if he's taught it to the elder nephew. It's hard to find anything on touch online as a lot of search results are about the iPod touch.

I also recall learning matching by playing concentration.
Merry Andrew
 
  1  
Reply Tue 16 Jun, 2009 01:05 pm
@jespah,
Seaglass and I play Rummy all the time (when we're not playing Scrabble). When I was teaching at that detention center for our wayward youth, the big card game among the resident inmates was Spades, which is just Hearts with the suits switched around. They all believed that the game had been invented in a prison; that's why they loved it.
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Tue 16 Jun, 2009 01:09 pm
@DrewDad,
The game popular among American blacks which they call "bid whizz" is virtually indistinguishable from whist. I believe that one of those rich dudes, John Jacob Astor perhaps (i look around) invented contract bridge by modifying whist.
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Tue 16 Jun, 2009 01:10 pm
@Merry Andrew,
I beg to differ . . . spades and hearts are considerably different than is implied by simply switching the suits around.
Merry Andrew
 
  1  
Reply Tue 16 Jun, 2009 01:11 pm
@Setanta,
Quote:
spades and hearts are considerably different than is implied by simply switching the suits around.


You could be right. I don't play either, so that was just the impression I had.
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Tue 16 Jun, 2009 01:13 pm
Here we go, from Wikipedia: "The modern game of contract bridge was the result of innovations to the scoring of auction bridge made by Harold Stirling Vanderbilt and others." It earlier observed that auction bridge was developed from whist.
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Tue 16 Jun, 2009 01:15 pm
@Merry Andrew,
In hearts, the object is either to take all the hearts (which gives each of the other player 26 points), or to take none of them. Those are ideals, and usually, you're doing well if you take as few hearts as possible. The "Bitch," the Queen of Spades, is worth 13 points, and each heart is worth one point. As soon as one player gets over 69 points, or 100 points (it varies regionally), the game is over and the player with the lowest score has won.

Spades, however, is a pretty standard trick-taking game, but spades are always the trump suit.
0 Replies
 
panzade
 
  1  
Reply Tue 16 Jun, 2009 01:19 pm
@DrewDad,
I think it was a Admiral Hornblower in the West Indies where he played Whist for money

from the American Contract Bridge League:
Quote:
Bridge traces its origins to the British game of whist, first played in the 16th century. It may be named for the Galata Bridge in Istanbul, which British soldiers crossed during the Crimean War of the 19th century to reach a coffeehouse where they played cards. Contract bridge as we know it today began in the 1920s when Harold Vanderbilt came up with the early scoring system.
0 Replies
 
panzade
 
  1  
Reply Tue 16 Jun, 2009 01:20 pm
@jespah,
jespah
Quote:
I also recall learning matching by playing concentration.


yup
0 Replies
 
panzade
 
  1  
Reply Tue 16 Jun, 2009 01:22 pm
sorry about the Redundancy Department Of Redundancy set...I missed your post
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Tue 16 Jun, 2009 01:22 pm
By the way, although the name Hoyle is now copyright protected for books of rules of card games, and for a brand of playing cards, the original Hoyle was a man who wrote a treatise on the game of whist in the 17th century. I used to possess a facsimile copy. It grew legs once upon a time, and i've not seen it in 20 years. I understand, though, that he became popular enough with his rules for whist that he wrote rules for other games. Obviously, that is the origin of "according to Hoyle."
0 Replies
 
JPB
 
  1  
Reply Tue 16 Jun, 2009 01:24 pm
@Setanta,
I occasionally play spades and hearts online.
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Tue 16 Jun, 2009 01:46 pm
@JPB,
I knew you could play hearts online, but i didn't know about spades. Is it real time against other putative humans?
panzade
 
  1  
Reply Tue 16 Jun, 2009 01:51 pm
@Setanta,
yes....yahoo games has had spades games for many years.

Bridge Basic Online, a fine bridge site even has bots(robots) if you don't care to play with humans Shocked
0 Replies
 
 

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