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World's poor overwhelmed by rubbish - 17 photographs

 
 
msolga
 
Reply Sat 6 Jun, 2009 05:08 am

World Environment Day was established by the UN in 1972 to give a human face to environmental issues. But as these images show, developing countries suffer the worst effects of waste and pollution. Seventeen photographs published by The Guardian (UK) . Go to the link to access all the photographs. Here's the first one.:

http://static.guim.co.uk/sys-images/Guardian/Pix/pictures/2009/6/3/1244051419675/Garbage-A-polluted-creek--003.jpg

1 / 17
Here, a trash-covered creek in Manila, Philippines, where slums often adjoin rubbish dumps. The country's poorest sift through the garbage to find discarded objects they can sell on or re-use, or even scraps of food to eat
Photograph: Francis R. Malasig/EPA

http://www.guardian.co.uk/environment/gallery/2009/jun/05/waste-world-environment-day?picture=348339024
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Type: Discussion • Score: 1 • Views: 5,962 • Replies: 14
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msolga
 
  1  
Reply Sat 6 Jun, 2009 05:24 am
http://static.guim.co.uk/sys-images/Guardian/Pix/pictures/2009/6/3/1244051486955/Garbage-A-child-swims-in--019.jpg

8 / 17
A child swims in the polluted waters in Cilincing, one of the poorest communities of Jakarta in Indonesia which has very poor access to clean drinking water
Photograph: BEAWIHARTA/Reuters
0 Replies
 
msolga
 
  1  
Reply Sat 6 Jun, 2009 05:26 am
@msolga,
Just staggering. Plastic everywhere ... floating in rivers, on land ....

http://www.guardian.co.uk/environment/gallery/2009/jun/05/waste-world-environment-day?picture=348339024
0 Replies
 
dlowan
 
  1  
Reply Sat 6 Jun, 2009 05:37 am
@msolga,
Aarrrggghhh!
msolga
 
  1  
Reply Sat 6 Jun, 2009 05:53 am
@dlowan,
I know. Could make you weep, couldn't it?
0 Replies
 
msolga
 
  1  
Reply Sat 6 Jun, 2009 05:58 am
Greenwash: E-waste trade is the unacceptable face of recycling
Guardian.co.uk, Thursday 28 May 2009 13.03 BST


Computer manufacturers must take responsibility for dealing with electronic waste to ensure toxic trash doesn't fall into the wrong hands


Quote:
Dell, the world's second largest PC manufacturer, announced earlier this month that it is imposing a ban on the export of used equipment bearing its name to developing countries " unless the equipment is in full working order and intended for legitimate use.

The idea is to undermine the huge trade in e-waste, too much of which ends up in giant trash piles in Africa, India and China, from where it is dismantled, burned, treated with corrosive chemicals and otherwise persuaded to give up tiny amounts of chemicals that can be sold on. The big question is why all the other manufacturers don't have a similar policy.

I've seen these toxic waste operations in action. They call it recycling, but it's extremely damaging. In an industrial wasteland outside New Delhi in India, I watched as children as young as eight dunked bare circuit boards in acid to create a residue of copper for sale to a local works. Child labour? You bet. Health and safety? You have to be joking.

A family of migrant boys from Bihar, India's poorest state, told me they got used to the acrid fumes that had them coughing and giddy within minutes of coming on the job. "At the end of the day we have a strong drink and we are OK," one laughed. It's an evil trade. But how do you stop it?...<cont>


http://www.guardian.co.uk/environment/2009/may/28/greenwash-electronic-waste
0 Replies
 
djjd62
 
  1  
Reply Sat 6 Jun, 2009 06:01 am
if you see the documentary manufactured landscapes, they talk about the chinese communities that recycle computer parts, they heat the mother boards and components over small fires to soften wire and make transistors brittle enough to break, the documentary makers said you could smell the villages before you got to them because of these fires, the smoke is also toxic after long exposure


msolga
 
  1  
Reply Sat 6 Jun, 2009 06:11 am
@djjd62,
That would be by-products of the Chinese computer industry, yes, djjd?
But I'm also thinking of all the E-products from the west that end up in countries like Africa & others mentioned in the Guardian article above. We just send off shipload after ship-load of this stuff and dump the waste on these desperately poor communities? Just appalling.
djjd62
 
  1  
Reply Sat 6 Jun, 2009 06:14 am
@msolga,
i think it's also our stuff, china buys a lot of recycling to use in it's industry

in the doc they also show the people who take apart old oil tankers and ocean going vessels
msolga
 
  1  
Reply Sat 6 Jun, 2009 06:24 am
@djjd62,
A not-quite-so-charming side of globalization, hey? Sad
0 Replies
 
msolga
 
  1  
Reply Sat 6 Jun, 2009 06:28 am
... but how does all that plastic, such huge quantities of bags, etc ... end up in really remote, impoverished places in Africa , for example?
0 Replies
 
littlek
 
  2  
Reply Sat 6 Jun, 2009 06:34 am
Christ. How dare we? Go Dell!
msolga
 
  1  
Reply Sat 6 Jun, 2009 06:58 am
@littlek,
Yes indeed, but wouldn't it be even better if computer models were not constantly up-graded, requiring constant replacement models? An incredible amount of waste of materials .. which wouldn't be quite so bad if the E-garbage stayed in the country of production & wasn't dumped in poor countries.
0 Replies
 
littlek
 
  1  
Reply Sat 6 Jun, 2009 07:02 am
I think we're working on legislation that would force cell phone (maybe other electronics) manufacturers to make charging cords more universal and long-term. At least it's a small step in the right direction.
msolga
 
  1  
Reply Sat 6 Jun, 2009 07:06 am
@littlek,
Yes & about time! Sounds like a bit of serious regulation of these incredibly wasteful industries might be a very healthy thing for the whole planet! But fat chance, hey? Rolling Eyes
0 Replies
 
 

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