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ORGANIC VEGGIES AND FRUITS__IS IT WORTH IT?

 
 
saab
 
  1  
Reply Tue 19 May, 2009 11:32 pm
@farmerman,
sorry... file is the finest part of meat which is above the row of cotelets. It usually is rather expensive compared to the rest of the meat as there are no bones.
It was not the apples trees that had to be destroyed - the apple harvest. The rules and regulations come from 'EU

Read this article and you can see wat EU does to us now and then 20% of the harvest in GB is thrown out and I am sure it is the same in the rest of EU.
Sweden sells carrots which are not perfect as horse food. Not correctly shaped veggies in Denmark are supposed to be trown out, but I think some farmers are smart enough and sell them as organic veggies.
Not perfect shaped veggies are not even allowed to be given to needy people.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2199214/EU-rules-ban-sale-of-too-small-kiwis.html
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Wed 20 May, 2009 04:53 am
@saab,
Jeez Louise, I cant believe that the EU is that boneheaded. Like there is some health risk from eating imperfectly shaped veggies.
Youve ceded too much control to the beurocrats over there. You need a good revolution or two.

If orchrads have fruit that is scuzzy or blotched, they sell it for cider making. We have several cider mills near us where every fall there are waiting lines for people to have their fruits turned to various ciders.


PS, I quickly read the article and it appears that the RPA is acting in a capricious manner and everyone recognizes it as such. Dont you have gangsters over there ? You certainly need them.
saab
 
  1  
Reply Wed 20 May, 2009 07:17 am
@farmerman,
No, there is not risk in eating imperfectly shaped veggies - it is a logistic problem. When everything is same size it is easier to pack. What does not fit into the box - out.
That´s why all cucumbers have to be straight and same size - packing and transporting is much easier.
Also EU said all condoms had to have one size. I can´t believe that was a logistic problem, but they had to change the law again.

On June 7th all 27 states with 300 political parties can vote for the EU government for the first time. Before it was 15 states. Can you imagen what a mess that is going to be?????
0 Replies
 
saab
 
  1  
Reply Wed 20 May, 2009 07:24 am
@farmerman,
Friends of ours have a big forrest and sheep. Since back to the Vikings or even longer cattle used to be in the forrest.
Our friends wanted to put up a fence and have his sheep in the forrest. They eat the bush with one end and furtilize with the other.
The beurocrats (we say Eurocrats) said NO! It is not good for the forrest - things should grow naturally and sheep should be kept on grass.
Two years later the same beurocrats wrote a letter to our friends and asked them if they could imagen to have their sheep in the forrest if the GOVERNMENT would pay for a fence.
Scientists had found out that it is good for the forrest to have cattles grassing in a forrest.
0 Replies
 
JPB
 
  1  
Reply Wed 20 May, 2009 07:31 am
@JPB,
JPB wrote:

The one I was just looking at is $585 pre-paid for 30 weekly pickups and $375 for 15 (every other week). So, basically, 20-25/week.


I got an email from this group. I was wrong, it's 20 weeks prepaid at those levels not 30. So, 30-35/wk. I think I'll pass...
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Sat 23 May, 2009 09:06 am
@JPB,
picked several baskets of morels in the last few weeks and now the season is DONE!. Theres an organic veggie that I dearly love , and its locally grown too.

Ive heard that they are working on morel spawn to be able to grow this mushrrom commercially. OH FRABJUS DAY!!
0 Replies
 
Mame
 
  1  
Reply Sat 23 May, 2009 10:45 am
FM, I just watched a show about this... actually, it was in a tv series about a guy who does all these different jobs for a day each. The last one was morel picking. I hear they're tremedously expensive and here you are, picking your own.

Wonderful.
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Sat 23 May, 2009 11:37 am
@Mame,
All you have to do is know where to look and when.
0 Replies
 
JLNobody
 
  1  
Reply Sat 23 May, 2009 10:51 pm
I buy organic when I can, but the other day I bought an organic cucumber for sandwhiches and salads, and it had a hole in it where a worm passed through. My wife and I discussed the relative merits of worm-free vs. pesticide-free produce.
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Sun 24 May, 2009 11:23 pm
@JLNobody,
Good farming practice always should consider using companion planting. Sowing a lot of radish seeds among the cucumber or squash plants will protect against the dreaded borers. The farmers must have been doing monoculture in these giant California truck fields where everything is a formula, including acceptable losses .

Organic or not, We always try to buy as local as we can for the product and we usually have a distance limit for "seasonalv non seasonal" produce. We will never buy lettuce from Calif, but will buy S Carolina lettuce or local hothouse lettuce when our seasons dont allow fresh .

Right now, certain cole crops are a coming in locally. Ive got my own plantings of brocolli raahb (broccolini) and mustard flowers and tender "greens". ( I have to watch my intake of these as they are very high in vitamin K.
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Thu 30 Jul, 2009 02:10 pm
@farmerman,
farmerman wrote:

The multiple for "organically grown" fruits and veggies is about 1.30% to over 2X . Several supermarkets have gone to exclusively organic (with markeup). Weve tested several fruits and have yet to be able to discern a flavor difference.
Also, in fruits like grapes or strawberries, we wash them with a mild detergent and run them under water to remove any residues.

DOES ANYONE ELSE FEEL A LITTLE LIKE WERE BEING FLEECED?

We buy local where we can. Now weve got local spring onions and a few cole veggies ( I have to watch my cole intake because of their super high vitamin K)



http://www.theglobeandmail.com/life/health/organic-food-isnt-any-more-nutritious/article1235508/

Quote:
Consumers who choose organic food are often willing to pay a premium, but it turns out added nutritional benefits may not be included in the hefty price tag.

A new analysis has found organic food has the same nutritional quality as crops grown under conventional methods.

“There's no evidence that organically-produced food is nutritionally superior to conventionally-produced food,” said Alan Dangour, public-health nutritionist and senior lecturer in public-health nutrition at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine.

“You can buy organic for other things, but there's no evidence you should be buying it because there's enhanced nutrient content of organic food.”

The analysis " funded by the Food Standards Agency of Britain and considered the largest of its kind " has sparked new controversy in the long-brewing debate over the perceived benefits of organic versus conventionally-grown food.


Quote:
In the new study, which will be published in the September issue of the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, researchers conducted a comprehensive review of 55 scientific studies, known as a meta-analysis, to better understand the nutritional differences between organic and conventional food.

They concluded that levels of major nutrients, including vitamin C, magnesium, calcium, zinc and potassium, were similar in organic and non-organic crops.

But there were some differences that researchers noted. Organic crops tended to have higher phosphorous and acidity levels, while conventional crops were found to have higher amounts of nitrogen, differences researchers said could likely be attributed to variations in fertilizer use and ripeness at time of harvest.
0 Replies
 
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Thu 30 Jul, 2009 02:22 pm
@farmerman,
http://latimesblogs.latimes.com/dailydish/2009/07/nothing-starts-a-food-fight-like-organic.html

http://www.latimes.com/features/food/la-fo-calcook1-2009jul01%2C0%2C2885942.story

Quote:

The real world isn't black and white at all. Between pure organics and the reckless use of chemicals, there is a huge gray area, and this is where most farming is done.

Ignoring this means that not only are you being misinformed, but you're also taking your eye off the real mission of supporting small farmers who grow wonderful food.

Whether something is grown organically might be one of the factors you use when you're considering what to buy, but it is by no means the only one: For me, seasonality, locality and -- above all, flavor -- trump it.

And it certainly is not a surefire solution to all of life's (or even agriculture's) ills. You can be a bad farmer growing organically, and you can be a good farmer and still use chemical pesticides, herbicides and fertilizers.

In large part, this is a credit to the organic farming movement, as many of the ideas and techniques it pioneered have now worked their way into the mainstream, reducing the use of chemicals even among farmers who aren't completely organic.
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Thu 30 Jul, 2009 02:55 pm
@ehBeth,
boola boola.

THE use of chemical fertilizers means that we are feeding the plant and organic fertilizers benefit the soil. I try to be in a mix of the two, since, in my field crops, I always have used cerop rotation and covercrops like annual rye grasses in between plantings. We call this "green manure" . We also use a goodly amount of sheep manures on the fields every two years.

Still, I use a 10:20:10 chemical fertilizer for corn and orchard grasses.

When folks understand that theres little frankenfood being planted and tended. USe of herbicides like roundup or krovar are metered and monitored because evolution of resistance is a response to overuse of herbicides and pesticides.

0 Replies
 
Thomas
 
  1  
Reply Thu 30 Jul, 2009 03:03 pm
@farmerman,
farmerman wrote:
The multiple for "organically grown" fruits and veggies is about 1.30% to over 2X . Several supermarkets have gone to exclusively organic (with markeup). Weve tested several fruits and have yet to be able to discern a flavor difference.

My impression, which I have yet to test quantitatively, is that organic fruits and veggies taste better (riper, mostly) than non-organic produce that you buy in the same aisle of the grocery store. But, the taste differential vanishes once you control for price. Go to a better store. Buy non-organic produce that costs the same as the organic stuff in the first store. I predict you will get the same quality improvement as you would from going organic.

Organic produce might be preferrable for environmental reasons -- smaller amount of insecticides, less fertilizer runoff, and so forth. But for taste, I wouldn't prefer it over non-organic food you can get for the same price.
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Thu 30 Jul, 2009 03:36 pm
@Thomas,
I wanna grow about 20 acres of HOPS. Know anything I can do with Hops?
roger
 
  1  
Reply Thu 30 Jul, 2009 04:07 pm
@farmerman,
That sounds like a truely Presidential crop.
0 Replies
 
Thomas
 
  1  
Reply Thu 30 Jul, 2009 04:32 pm
@farmerman,
Farmerman wrote:
Know anything I can do with Hops?

Sell it to Yuengling's?

Set up a DIY-brewery and make your own?
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Thu 30 Jul, 2009 05:12 pm
@Thomas,
I seem to remember they're pretty... put them in a vase?
0 Replies
 
 

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