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Why should I buy an Apple computer instead of a regular PC?

 
 
Reply Mon 2 Mar, 2009 01:37 am
I am in need of a new laptop. All my life I have used PCs and am very familiar with them. I know the apple computers, such as the iMac and the Macbook laptop have become very popular recently and I find that more and more people are switching over to Macs! Why is this? What makes a Mac a better computer than a PC? Apple computers do seem a bit more pricey than regular PCs.
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Type: Question • Score: 11 • Views: 8,410 • Replies: 12
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OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Mon 2 Mar, 2009 01:44 am
Thay sure have a fanatical cult following.
0 Replies
 
gungasnake
 
  1  
Reply Mon 2 Mar, 2009 01:45 am
@xourfalselove,
The Mac is a closed system. I don't know of a rational reason for buying one.
Robert Gentel
 
  1  
Reply Mon 2 Mar, 2009 02:08 am
@gungasnake,
The closed system has both advantages and disadvantages. One advantage is that with control over both the hardware and the software of the machine there is less to go wrong, and you don't have problems with incompatible hardware or software as often.

Of course, the disadvantages are great, and you pay a premium for this when you can merely properly select your hardware yourself, but it contributes to a better overall out-of-box experience for Macs than for the average PC.
0 Replies
 
TTH
 
  1  
Reply Mon 2 Mar, 2009 03:26 am
Mac owners don't have to worry about viruses like PCs owners do. I work with both types of computers and I find Macs are easier to navigate through. They have also come down in price over the years.
gungasnake
 
  1  
Reply Mon 2 Mar, 2009 08:32 am
@TTH,
Last I heard there were a dozen or so linux viruses and they were all targeted at servers. Not all PCs run windows.
0 Replies
 
joefromchicago
 
  2  
Reply Mon 2 Mar, 2009 09:46 am
@xourfalselove,
I have a Mac at home and I use PCs at work, so I have a fair amount of experience with both.

Pros:
+Macs are easier to use (although Windows is catching up in this regard, mostly by emulating the Apple OS)
+Almost no viruses
+The system is not as buggy and prone to crashes
+Superior applications in certain areas (e.g. graphics, video)
+The smug sense of superiority you get from owning a Mac and not supporting the evil Microsoft empire

Cons:
-Inability to share files with the vast majority of people out there who have surrendered to the evil Microsoft empire. By including all of its basic programs -- Word, Excel, Outlook, etc. -- on each Wintel machine, Microsoft programs have become the de facto standard. So, for instance, if you want to open all of those attachments that you receive in MSWord, you'll either have to break down and buy that app for the Mac or else tell people to send the files in some format that your Mac can open. Likewise, there are compatibility problems with some online services that don't like the Mac (e.g. Netflix streaming video only works on Windows machines running Internet Explorer)
-Fewer programs in general, especially games
-Significantly more expensive hardware
Shapeless
 
  1  
Reply Mon 2 Mar, 2009 02:59 pm
I was a PC person my whole life until my current Mac PowerBook (the now archaic G4), and I'm pretty sure I've been converted permanently. My PowerBook has already outlived my previous two computers combined (a Dell and a Toshiba), so I feel that the higher price I paid for this PowerBook was worth it.

Only once have I had a relatively big problem with my Mac, but finding a Mac technician to fix it was astonishingly easy. I'm kind of in awe of the "Genius Bar" people at Mac stores, though as a non-techie I'm easily impressed.
0 Replies
 
Cycloptichorn
 
  1  
Reply Mon 2 Mar, 2009 03:03 pm
@xourfalselove,
xourfalselove wrote:

I am in need of a new laptop. All my life I have used PCs and am very familiar with them. I know the apple computers, such as the iMac and the Macbook laptop have become very popular recently and I find that more and more people are switching over to Macs! Why is this? What makes a Mac a better computer than a PC? Apple computers do seem a bit more pricey than regular PCs.


Nothing makes a Mac better. You shouldn't buy one based on the perception that this is true.

Frankly, the only difference between the two is in the operating system, otherwise it's essentially the same hardware.

Cycloptichorn
Shirakawasuna
 
  2  
Reply Mon 2 Mar, 2009 05:48 pm
The selling point of Apple computers is two-fold.

1) Sleek, complete hardware. When you buy an apple laptop, you tend to get the complete package and a guarantee that it will work with mac software. It also has arguably "sexy" cases and some other conveniences, like the macbook's magnetic power connector or convenient 'smart sleep', where it puts your computer on 'sleep', where what you are doing is stored on ram (uses power) but is shifted to the HD if power gets low enough. The hardware for macs is (usually) of a higher quality than the lowest-end Dells/HPs. Concerning macbooks specifically, the price is about the same in terms of the hardware you get. The support for the hardware is also streamlined, so extended warranties are cheaper than those offered by HP/Dell (although arguably still not a good deal).

Some people don't like the mac look, so that's entirely personal preference.

2) the OS. This is actually the main selling point. The user interface and method for installing/uninstalling programs is very simple, direct, secure, and stable. You won't need to shut down your computer ever night like Bill Gates does. Installing most programs is as easy as downloading a file, opening it, and dragging the icon to your 'Applications' folder. The dock is pretty handy. OS X also comes with a number of apps you don't get by default in windows (for good reason), like iTunes, Dashboard, GarageBand, a DVD player, a backup program, etc.

Short version: it's easy, stable, and secure.

With that said, I don't use macs. I prefer linux and use a thinkpad - the best laptop I've ever used. If you don't like the hardware look of macs or don't feel like learning a new interface, even though it's a bit more logical, don't get a mac. Macs also have a smaller hardware library, although the essentials are covered. If you desperately need some windows-only programs but still prefer the sound of macs, you can dualboot windows or use virtualization.

I recommend buying a mac if you can afford getting the slightly higher-end gear and feel like learning the interface. I also recommend buying 2nd or 3rd generation: if there's a brand-new macbook out, I'd wait a couple months and then buy one.

If you want to save money but spend more time + effort learning a new interface, go with linux. Essentially all of its apps are free and constantly improved and if you need windows-only apps, dualbooting and virtualization is available.
0 Replies
 
USAFHokie80
 
  1  
Reply Tue 3 Mar, 2009 08:40 am
@Cycloptichorn,
I think this might be the first thing Cyclo and I have ever agreed on.

She's (?) absolutely correct. Mac computers ARE PCs. They use Intel chips, the same RAM, HDDs and everything else that a "PC" uses. The difference is that Macs only support a very, very, very small subset of available hardware so they can minimize compatibility issues. Of course, this severely limits your choice when you want to upgrade something.

As for a Mac being easier to navigate, I refute that. And Windows certainly does not "emulate the Mac OS". To say one is easier than the other is completely subjective. For me, I think the Mac OS is cumbersome. Why did it take them 20 years to but an eject button on drives? Hell, I'm not even sure if the eject buttons work or if you still have to drag a disk into the TRASH to get it to eject. Bah.

Macs have become so popular largely out of pride. Young people buy them because of the shiny plastic cases. I agree, Macs do have design that PCs lack. But being "pretty" is not the intended function of a computing device. PCs are not fashion accessories - Macs are.
0 Replies
 
ebrown p
 
  1  
Reply Tue 3 Mar, 2009 09:08 am
@joefromchicago,
Quote:
Inability to share files with the vast majority of people out there who have surrendered to the evil Microsoft empire. By including all of its basic programs -- Word, Excel, Outlook, etc. -- on each Wintel machine


Doesn' t OpenOffice run on Macs?

I run Linux and use OpenOffice all the time. OpenOffice has the ability to read and write Microsoft files. It is good enough that I use it professionally (i.e. I work on docments in OpenOffice and then convert to MS format to share with less enlightened coworkers).
joefromchicago
 
  1  
Reply Tue 3 Mar, 2009 09:18 am
@ebrown p,
ebrown p wrote:
Doesn' t OpenOffice run on Macs?

I have no clue, but I'm eager to find out.
0 Replies
 
 

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