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Ravens vs British Farm Animals

 
 
Reply Mon 5 Jan, 2009 08:32 am
http://www.guardian.co.uk/environment/2008/may/04/wildlife
Quote:



Like a scene from Alfred Hitchcock's The Birds, large groups of ravens are flocking together to attack defenceless victims and eat them alive.

Throughout the country, farmers have reported a rise in the number of calves, lambs, and sheep pecked to death. Animals not killed have been left in agony as the birds eat their eyes, tongues and the soft flesh of their underbelly.

Farmers are demanding the right to destroy the protected birds, but the Royal Society for the Protection of Birds says it does not see any need for a change to legislation.

The birds - which have acquired mythical status over the centuries, with six being kept at the Tower of London with their wings clipped in case they leave and the kingdom falls - were almost exterminated in many areas during the 19th century. But in the past 20 years they have made a comeback, with colonies as far afield as Inverness, Devon and East Sussex.

'Raven attacks have become a huge problem across a wide area of the country,' said Johnny Hall, head of rural policy for the National Farmers Union of Scotland, which has been hardest hit. 'It's not just an issue with them taking lambs. We have substantial evidence of them attacking adult sheep and calves too. The attacks are so horrific that it's causing mental suffering to people who find the animals.'

Farmers in west Wales also say sheep have fallen prey to the growing raven population. 'The attacks on livestock are becoming a problem, but there's not a lot we can do about it,' said a spokesman for NFU Cymru.


Quote:
Farmers are demanding the right to destroy the protected birds, but the Royal Society for the Protection of Birds says it does not see any need for a change to legislation.


Obviously, this situation would not be tolerated for five seconds in the United States. I say again, the second amendment is an idea whose time has come, not just in America but over the entire world.
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Type: Discussion • Score: 3 • Views: 1,273 • Replies: 15
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Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Mon 5 Jan, 2009 08:39 am
Ah, the lunacy of the gun obsessed . . .
old europe
 
  1  
Reply Mon 5 Jan, 2009 08:54 am
I'm rather confident that gunga would shoot down the last Bald Eagle, just to make the point that the 2nd Amendment is not to be messed with...
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Mon 5 Jan, 2009 08:57 am
@Setanta,
I wonder whether snakey would state anything differently had these birds been, say BALD EAGLES that were attacking farm animals in, say, Delaware. (There are a number of court cases of just that. ) In those cases the USDI pays a loss fee to the livestock owners.
Ranchers in the Bitteroots are seeing the same results by not being able to destroy wolves. AT the same time they line up to collect their fees.

The issue is really about species protection, not guns. We have more guns per capita than any other nation except maybe Somalia and we have such laws that discourage slaughtering certain wild animals.
0 Replies
 
gungasnake
 
  1  
Reply Mon 5 Jan, 2009 09:25 am
American farmers' attitudes towards wolves are generally denoted "triple-S", i.e. "Shoot, Shovel, and Shut up about it". Hawks and eagles were being shot (as opposed to dying out from DDT) so long as they represented a threat to chickens; after farmers started keeping chickens in cages, nobody cared any more.

Ravens are basically glorified crows, and NOBODY in the US would tolerate ravens killing farm animals the way the article describes for five seconds.

That's not even normal behavior for crows or ravens; these are rogue animals similar to the situation which arises occasionally when some tiger or other cat develops a taste for human flesh and need to be treated the same way and if govt. agencies aren't willing to deal with it, the people should be able to.
rosborne979
 
  1  
Reply Mon 5 Jan, 2009 09:44 am
@gungasnake,
Hitchcock warned us about this.
0 Replies
 
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Mon 5 Jan, 2009 09:55 am
@gungasnake,
youre ignoring the point gunga. Weve made wolves and eagles "untouchable" species by the same bases as the Brits ravens. Ravens have always been facultative hunters, predators one time, scavengers the next. Maybe they have a lot in common with their T-rex great great great, cousins.

ITS NOT A GUN ISSUE, Britain aint gonna follow the US.
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Mon 5 Jan, 2009 09:57 am
@old europe,
I hadn't thought about it before, but in the circumstances, i'd have to say that i'd share your confidence.
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Mon 5 Jan, 2009 10:19 am
@Setanta,
Well,Odin, was attended by two Ravens, who whispered advice in his ears.
And it was the Raven that Noah sent forth from the Ark.

We Europeans are just followers of our traditional cults ...

But seriously: I will report gunga to the Yeoman Warder Ravenmaster, Royal Raven Sergeant (CRS) Glenn Cuneo!
Foofie
 
  1  
Reply Mon 5 Jan, 2009 12:03 pm
In the U.S. ravens used to be quite abundant in inhabited areas, like crows today (same family). Then they were hunted for their harming whatever. Today the ravens in the U.S. are human shy, and stay deep in forests, I read.

Anyway, "quoth the raven, 'nevermore.'" I forgot the name of this poem from Poe?
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Mon 5 Jan, 2009 12:12 pm
@Walter Hinteler,
Don't forget Floki Vilgardarsson (Raven Floki), who found Iceland through the use of ravens he captured in the Faroe Islands.
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  2  
Reply Mon 5 Jan, 2009 12:13 pm
@Foofie,
Unsurprisingly, the poem is entitled "The Raven."
Foofie
 
  1  
Reply Mon 5 Jan, 2009 12:24 pm
@Setanta,
Setanta wrote:

Unsurprisingly, the poem is entitled "The Raven."


Thank you. My favorite poet is Robert W. Service (The Shooting of Dan McGrew/The Cremation of Sam McGee).
0 Replies
 
gungasnake
 
  1  
Reply Mon 5 Jan, 2009 12:29 pm
Again, these are rogue animals which have learned a VERY bad habit and, the funny thing is, that they are nowhere remotely close to being stupid and humans would only have to shoot ten or twelve of them doing it and it would never happen again.
rosborne979
 
  1  
Reply Mon 5 Jan, 2009 12:34 pm
@gungasnake,
gungasnake wrote:
Again, these are rogue animals which have learned a VERY bad habit and, the funny thing is, that they are nowhere remotely close to being stupid and humans would only have to shoot ten or twelve of them doing it and it would never happen again.

Ravens and Crows are much harder to shoot than you might expect. They are very smart and know how to avoid hunters.
gungasnake
 
  1  
Reply Mon 5 Jan, 2009 02:50 pm
@rosborne979,
Get on youtube and type in 'crow hunt'. It isn't that overwhelmingly hard to do.
0 Replies
 
 

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