47
   

What books do you read and read again?

 
 
Sturgis
 
  2  
Reply Thu 3 May, 2012 08:11 am
@dlowan,
It's one of those things. Impossible for me to really explain.
dlowan
 
  1  
Reply Thu 3 May, 2012 08:28 am
@Sturgis,
Maybe you think you'll die when you have finished it?
Sturgis
 
  2  
Reply Thu 3 May, 2012 08:53 am
@dlowan,
Bingo!

Can't really explain it beyond that (and am interested on how you knew that was my issue with it).

dlowan
 
  1  
Reply Thu 3 May, 2012 09:21 am
@Sturgis,
Name of the book plus your reluctance.
0 Replies
 
voice of Logic 700
 
  2  
Reply Sat 1 Sep, 2012 02:30 pm
@dlowan,
The very first Artemis Fowl book. I know it's a book for grade 7's but I read them when I was in grade 3/4. I really love them! My friends are puzzled as to why I like them, I don't really know. They were just really fun to read when I was a little kid.
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Sat 1 Sep, 2012 02:48 pm
I haven't given away any of my Soho Crime series books, since most of them are well written compared to the norm. When I'm out of new books to read, and not in the mood for an actual educational book (I'm read Witold Rybcynski's City Life off and on, and trying to work my way into Nabokov stories), I'll reread a Soho.
I've read so many police procedurals over the years, and read them so fast, that I can't just tell you what happened in one of those books I've already read.

So, I'm reading Grace Brophy's The Last Enemy as if like new but not quite. I remembered, looking at the cover, that I liked the two books of hers I'd read, and that they were both set in Perugia and its environs, and started to recognize some of the characters, but now, on page 93, I can't say 'who did it'. That's like getting to eat a delicious ice cream sundae twice.
0 Replies
 
Krrypton
 
  2  
Reply Tue 1 Apr, 2014 06:45 am
@dlowan,
Jane Austen's all books I can read again, esp. Pride and prejudice. Withering heights, Jane Eyre are my favourites too. And Elizabeth Gaskell, Wilkie Collins, Thomas Hardy, etc. Mainly all classics. And Sherlock Holmes.
tsarstepan
 
  3  
Reply Fri 9 May, 2014 11:33 am
http://s3-ec.buzzfed.com/static/2014-05/enhanced/webdr06/8/8/enhanced-4058-1399550675-3.jpg
http://www.buzzfeed.com/alanwhite/23-charming-illustrations-of-untranslatable-words-from-other?sub=3230269_2916271
dlowan
 
  1  
Reply Sat 10 May, 2014 04:35 pm
@tsarstepan,
YES!
0 Replies
 
sunyata
 
  -2  
Reply Sun 11 May, 2014 09:24 pm
@dlowan,
human all too human
the gay science
Thus Spoke Zarathustra
dhammapada
upanishads
hagakure
The Book of Five Rings
shobogenzo
tao te ching
zhuangzi
on war
art of war
The Military Maxims of Napoleon
mein kampf
just to name some
panzade
 
  4  
Reply Mon 12 May, 2014 08:00 am
@sunyata,
show off much?
classicalcynic
 
  1  
Reply Tue 13 May, 2014 06:57 pm
@panzade,
how is that showing off i've read all those books too plus more..
is it showing off to read alot too?
you might be jealous.
if any thing you might have something to learn from him/her if they retained the knowledge
panzade
 
  4  
Reply Tue 13 May, 2014 07:17 pm
@classicalcynic,
I guess I'm cynical.
What I would prefer is a title and an explanation of what makes the poster keep coming back to that read...you know....like an exchange on a passionate subject that informs others...or am I asking too much?
classicalcynic
 
  2  
Reply Tue 13 May, 2014 07:41 pm
@panzade,
then say that rather than what you said early.
since i read all those books, could i giv some insight into it?
ask...
panzade
 
  1  
Reply Tue 13 May, 2014 07:51 pm
@classicalcynic,
knock yourself out..
0 Replies
 
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Tue 13 May, 2014 08:02 pm
@classicalcynic,
Which book have you reread most often? why do you reread it?
classicalcynic
 
  -1  
Reply Tue 13 May, 2014 09:29 pm
@ehBeth,
1 human all too human- it gives deep insight to human behavior history religion metaphysics the state the individual women etc... it expressed in a collection of aphorisms which are easy to read and fast. he covers topics in depth while being quick about it and to the point without any red herrings, also very humorous and amusing, quick wit and cleverness, one of the best writing styles ever. also his apollo & dionysain resembles yin yang http://www.google.com/url?q=http://www.sparknotes.com/philosophy/nietzsche/section1.rhtml&sa=U&ei=oeByU4D1KbLesASnxYCgAw&ved=0CB0QFjAA&usg=AFQjCNF5L2Qt4wNt1svSYoQLtE1uO108rw
classicalcynic
 
  1  
Reply Tue 13 May, 2014 09:54 pm
@ehBeth,
hagakure - love the fatalistic mentality the stoical writing the fascinating way of the noble servant. a quote: although it stand to reason that a samurai should be mindful of the way it would see that we are all negligent, consequently if some one where to ask what is the true meaning of the way, the person who would be able to answer promptly is rare. this is because it is not established in one's mind beforehand, from this one's unmindfulness of the way can be known. negligence is an extreme thing. the way of the samurai is found in death when it comes to either/or there is only the quick choice of death. it is not particularly difficult be determined and advance. to say dying without reaching's one aim is to die a dog's death is the frivolous way of sophisticates. when pressed with the choice of life or death it is not necessary to gain one's aim. we all want to live and we make our logic to what we like, but not having reached our aim and continuing to live is cowardice.
0 Replies
 
classicalcynic
 
  2  
Reply Tue 13 May, 2014 10:03 pm
@ehBeth,
tao te ching - it expresses its metaphysics in a poetically profound way.
it teaches against confucianism. it encompasses totality. it's a manual for success and leadership.
zhuangzi - same as explanation above except the manual for success and leadership... but it teaches how to have a sage like mind.
0 Replies
 
dlowan
 
  1  
Reply Mon 19 May, 2014 04:06 am
@sunyata,
Eclectic. Maybe too eclectic.???????
0 Replies
 
 

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