0
   

MEDICAL INSURANCE

 
 
Reply Sun 19 Oct, 2008 07:01 pm
I am retired, and get some medical insurance from my former employment, plus Medi-care. I am also a member of AARP. Should I also buy the AARP supplemental insurance? What would it cover?
  • Topic Stats
  • Top Replies
  • Link to this Topic
Type: Question • Score: 0 • Views: 1,544 • Replies: 5
No top replies

 
mismi
 
  1  
Reply Sun 19 Oct, 2008 07:33 pm
@Woollcott,
A supplement usually picks up where Medicare leaves off. There are many choices out there. Is the insurance from your former employer a Medicare supplement? It should be since you are on medicare. You will need to find that out first. Is should pick up the Medicare deductible plus the 20% balance on Medicare part B (doctors). It should also as a supplement fill in where Medicare leaves off on the part A (hospital).

If it is not - then you could look at AARP, Humana, BCBS usually has pretty good supplemental coverage. There are many others with different rates and benefits...

You need part D as well...(Drug)
0 Replies
 
roger
 
  1  
Reply Mon 20 Oct, 2008 01:18 pm
@Woollcott,
A small point here, Woollcott, and I don't really know how to express it, so bare with me.

I just received a flyer from AARP offering information on insurance. At the bottom, it contains a couple of caveats.

Quote:
AARP does not make health care plan recommendations for individuals. You are strongly encouraged to evaluate your needs before choosing a health care plan


Also:
Quote:
AARP Health is a collection of health related products, services and insurance programs available to AARP members.. Neither AARP nor its affiliate is the insurer. AARP contracts with insurers to make coveage available to members. Insurers and providers pay a fee to AARP and its affiliate for use of the AARP trademark and other services. Amounts paid are used for general purposes of AARP and its members.


The bold is a part of the disclaimer. I don't pretend to know the meaning of the second quote. It could mean that AARP accepts advertising, and receives a fee for doing so. This is not a spectacular endorsement. In fact, I don't see an endorsement at all, neither of the companies representated, nor any individual policy. Personally, I believe AARP could provide a little more guidance.

I'll also mention that one of our members, Phoenix, submitted a request for information from some source (not necessairly AARP) and received so many phone calls as to amount to harassment. And having requested information, her subscription to the national do not call list gave her no protection.
mismi
 
  1  
Reply Mon 20 Oct, 2008 02:42 pm
@roger,
That's good information Roger. I think in light of that, it would be best for you to go through your former employer and find out what kind of insurance that is first. It may very well be that you already have a supplement through them and do not need additional coverage.

Most of the time, when you have insurance through where you retired, when you go on Medicare the coverage will be changed to a supplement. It is cheaper for the employer to provide than regular benefits so they are usually pretty good about seeing that it is changed. Hopefully you will find that you are set and won't have to go through any other carrier for the supplemental benefits.
roger
 
  1  
Reply Mon 20 Oct, 2008 03:11 pm
@mismi,
Sounds good, mismi, but doesn't apply to me. I'm not planning to be 65 for another half year, and based on costs, I had to pass on the COBRA option.
mismi
 
  1  
Reply Mon 20 Oct, 2008 03:12 pm
@roger,
I am sorry Roger...COBRA sucks...so expensive.
0 Replies
 
 

Related Topics

 
  1. Forums
  2. » MEDICAL INSURANCE
Copyright © 2019 MadLab, LLC :: Terms of Service :: Privacy Policy :: Page generated in 0.03 seconds on 09/20/2019 at 04:50:11