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Red squirrels making a comeback- possibly

 
 
McTag
 
Reply Fri 17 Oct, 2008 01:48 am
Good news from the treetops at nut-gathering time

http://www.independent.co.uk/environment/nature/red-squirrel-becoming-immune-to-killer-virus-962739.html
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Type: Discussion • Score: 7 • Views: 5,862 • Replies: 18
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Merry Andrew
 
  1  
Reply Fri 17 Oct, 2008 03:52 am
@McTag,
Hoo-bloody-ray!!! Love the li'l smeggers.
0 Replies
 
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Fri 17 Oct, 2008 03:56 am
lotta dark meat on red squirrels
Merry Andrew
 
  1  
Reply Fri 17 Oct, 2008 04:02 am
@farmerman,
Yeah, but you need a dozen of 'em to make a decent stew.
0 Replies
 
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Fri 17 Oct, 2008 05:19 am
First time I ever ate Brunswick stew I asked what that tasty crunchy meat was.

"Red squirrel " I was told.

I felt really guilty as I savored every tiny morsel.
0 Replies
 
cjhsa
 
  1  
Reply Fri 17 Oct, 2008 05:47 am
@McTag,
We've got a load of them in Michigan. Nasty little buggers. They love to chew the nuts off of the competition, and, they bust hunters. It's open season on them here all year because they can be so destructive to homes and property.
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Tue 11 Nov, 2008 02:36 am
So that's the thank I rescued you ...


http://i36.tinypic.com/15qcljp.jpg


Quote:
Uncharitable-minded types know squirrels as rats with bushy tails. A Northumberland rodent named "Elvis" has done little to assist his species' public relations.

Elvis, an injured red squirrel, attacked a pensioner who came to his aid at the weekend, leaving the man needing hospital treatment.

Ernie Gordon, 75, a squirrel fanatic who wrote a children's book The Adventures of Rusty Red Coat, was called out last Friday to rescue the creature after staff at a local timber yard said they had seen the animal dragging its hind legs. Mr Gordon, a retired civil servant, is known locally for spending each day at Alnwick's Hulne Park, studying and hand-feeding the squirrels.

The animal was caught, after several attempts, by a girl who threw a towel over it and it was contained in a picnic basket. Mr Gordon took Elvis to the vet, where X-rays revealed he had a broken pelvis " hence the name. The six-month-old went home with Mr Gordon, who built it a small den in a straw-filled lawnmower box.

But when he picked up Elvis, he sank his teeth repeatedly into Mr Gordon's hands. "It hurt not a little bit, I can tell you," said Mr Gordon, after having a tetanus injection and a course of antibiotics. "You cannot believe the strength or pressure a little squirrel has in its jaw.

"A red squirrel can crack open an almond nutshell with its teeth so you can imagine how it felt."He took a little bit of persuading to let go but the fingers are fine and there's no hard feelings."

After the disagreement, Elvis moved out and is staying in the garage of a mutual friend in a nearby village, Rennington, where the author used to live.

Mr Gordon continues to nurse him, with promising results " contradicting the vet who had initially doubted the squirrel's ability to remain inactive enough to recover and survive.

Mr Gordon and his friend plan to release Elvis back into the local woods in four weeks. The author said: "This story is just absolutely lovely for the kids. It is a true tale."

An RSPCA spokesman said anyone who found a sick or injured squirrel should call the RSPCA or a local vet: "Anyone who finds a sick, injured or orphaned squirrel should resist the temptation to pick it up. Remember that squirrels use their teeth to crack open nuts, so they have a very strong bite."



0 Replies
 
hamburger
 
  1  
Reply Tue 11 Nov, 2008 01:30 pm
@McTag,
you wouldn't want any of our black or grey squirrels , would you ?
at any one time we have about a dozen of them "scampering" up and down the trees in our garden - and we live in the city !
when we drive downtown in the morning there are usually a few freshly squashed squirrels on the streets .
hbg
Merry Andrew
 
  1  
Reply Tue 11 Nov, 2008 03:47 pm
@hamburger,
Grey squirrels are a dime a dozen. Reds are fairly rare.
CalamityJane
 
  1  
Reply Tue 11 Nov, 2008 03:51 pm
@Merry Andrew,
We have plenty of grey ones here - they're undermining all the hillsides here Evil or Very Mad
Merry Andrew
 
  1  
Reply Tue 11 Nov, 2008 10:22 pm
@CalamityJane,
When I lived in the woods in New Hampshire we had both red and grey squirrels romping around. The reds are much smaller than the greys but they're quite aggressive. Where there's a colony of reds, the greys generally keep their distance.
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Thu 27 Nov, 2008 10:07 am
I photographed this squirrel in England recently

http://i36.tinypic.com/264rloz.jpg

I've never noticed before that they've some red colour as well.

0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Tue 10 Feb, 2009 12:17 am
There are no grey days coming ...

http://i44.tinypic.com/30k9l39.jpg vs. http://i39.tinypic.com/296gbcn.jpg



Report in The Guardian


Merry Andrew
 
  1  
Reply Tue 10 Feb, 2009 08:53 am
@Walter Hinteler,
Won't the RSPCA and such be up in arms over this? They went berserk over fox hunts.
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Tue 10 Feb, 2009 09:55 am
@Merry Andrew,
The RSPCA attacksed a "pointless cull" of the grey squirrels, called it "ethically dubious". (That was last year, when about 15,000 grey squirrels were culled in in Northumberland.)

0 Replies
 
McTag
 
  1  
Reply Thu 30 Apr, 2009 03:04 am

More squirrelly information.
In days gone by, reds were culled in Scotland.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/scotland/highlands_and_islands/8023283.stm
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Fri 5 Feb, 2010 04:01 pm
Red squirrels return as greys are culled:
Quote:
Red squirrels are returning to parts of Aberdeen where they haven’t been seen in decades, as efforts to control grey squirrels start to take effect.
...
Red squirrels have been sighted in the past six months along the Deeside corridor in the Aberdeen suburbs of Bieldside, Cults and Countesswells.
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Thu 17 Apr, 2014 02:37 am
@Walter Hinteler,
Full report: Red squirrels: The creature that everyone knows but is hardly seen
Quote:
The vast majority of Britons have never seen a red squirrel, according to a new survey which highlights how the native species has been decimated by the invasion of the grey squirrel.

Only five per cent of the population has ever seen a red squirrel in their garden, with that number falling to less than one per cent across the south of England and in the Midlands.

The species is more prevalent in its last remaining strongholds in the North-east and Scotland, where almost one in five people see them on a monthly basis, according to the first in a series of annual RSPB surveys on the prevalence of eight non-bird species in UK gardens.

However, even in the north of the country red squirrel sightings are well below those for their grey rivals. More than nine tenths of Britons have seen a grey squirrel in their garden at some point, with 71 per cent seeing them on a monthly basis.

I see a lot here around our house ... and nearly every some on the bypass (rather flat then).
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  2  
Reply Fri 24 Feb, 2017 12:54 am
Red squirrels: 5,000 volunteers sought to save species – and help kill invasive greys
Quote:
An army of 5,000 volunteers is being sought to save the red squirrel from extinction by monitoring populations, educating children – and bludgeoning grey squirrels to death.

The Wildlife Trusts’ biggest-ever recruitment drive is focused on areas of northern England, north Wales and Northern Ireland where invasive grey squirrels first introduced by the Victorians are driving the retreating red squirrel population to extinction.

More than 2.5 million grey squirrels are continuing to spread north through England and into Scotland, out-competing the 140,000 remaining red squirrels and spreading the squirrelpox virus, which does not affect greys but rapidly kills reds.
0 Replies
 
 

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