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Extreme right gains in Austrian election

 
 
Reply Mon 29 Sep, 2008 12:28 pm
Morehttp://kurier.at/nachrichten/wahl/data/m_file7.png
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Type: Discussion • Score: 0 • Views: 4,639 • Replies: 24
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Walter Hinteler
 
  2  
Reply Mon 29 Sep, 2008 12:47 pm
@joefromchicago,
joefromchicago wrote:
joefromchicago
 
  2  
Reply Mon 29 Sep, 2008 01:28 pm
@Walter Hinteler,
I agree that too much can be made of the election results as a victory for the "extreme right," or that the Austrians are just "different." Much of the result can be explained as simply a protest vote against the established parties
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Mon 29 Sep, 2008 01:39 pm
@joefromchicago,
joefromchicago wrote:


I've seen and listened to Haider ('live').
Somehow I can understand why so many people followed the Nazi rhetoric (and that of other populists).
But I better understood, why some fiercely opposed and oppose such.


[When Hannibal crossed the Alps, he ordered the footsore, the weak and similar, to stay there. And so the Bavarian and Austrian regions became populated ... .]
0 Replies
 
Finn dAbuzz
 
  1  
Reply Sun 5 Oct, 2008 02:07 am
This is entirely in keeping with my prior predictions.

When you create an environment that the average person believes only extremists can solve, you are more responsible for the outcome than the extremists are.

This trend will continue to play out in Europe, as long as leftist politicians insist on Europeans surrendering their culture to immigrants.


Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Sun 5 Oct, 2008 03:05 am
@Finn dAbuzz,
Ehem ... in Austria, they always had either a conservative or a social-democratic or a coalition (of both parties) government.

At least during the last 60 years.
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Sun 5 Oct, 2008 03:10 am
@Finn dAbuzz,
Finn dAbuzz wrote:
This trend will continue to play out in Europe, as long as leftist politicians insist on Europeans surrendering their culture to immigrants.


Well, you certainly can try to re-install the EU. And I'm sure some right-wing governments in a few countries will do so.

However, it's a bit peculiar funny when this is related to Austria with its multi-nations history ...
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Fri 10 Oct, 2008 11:14 pm
I wonder what will happen now, since Haider died http=www.latimes.com/news/nationworld/world/la-fg-haider11-2008oct11,0,7175732.story?track=rss][b]in a car accident[/b] earlier this morning.
Finn dAbuzz
 
  1  
Reply Fri 10 Oct, 2008 11:14 pm
@Walter Hinteler,
Quote:
Ehem ... in Austria, they always had either a conservative or a social-democratic or a coalition (of both parties) government.


And this means what?




Question
joefromchicago
 
  2  
Reply Fri 10 Oct, 2008 11:34 pm
@Walter Hinteler,
Walter Hinteler wrote:

"For us, it's like the end of the world," Haider's spokesman, Stefan Petzner, told the Austria Press Agency.

I'll bet.
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Fri 10 Oct, 2008 11:38 pm
@joefromchicago,


Agreeing with the hope that it will happen soon.
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Fri 10 Oct, 2008 11:44 pm
@Finn dAbuzz,
Finn dAbuzz wrote:

Quote:
Ehem ... in Austria, they always had either a conservative or a social-democratic or a coalition (of both parties) government.


And this means what?




Question


I don't believe that the conservative and social-democratic governments as well as the coalition of those two parties were leftist politicians who insist(ed) on surrendering their culture to immigrants.
Besides that, Austria always had had 'immigrants' from the eastern parts of the empire - more than every third family in Vienna has been some part of there .... in the earlier 20th century, that is.

Finn dAbuzz
 
  1  
Reply Sat 11 Oct, 2008 01:17 am
@Walter Hinteler,
But something precipitated a lurch towards the right.

If not immigration, then what?

PS:

"Besides that," are you actually unable to distinguish between immigration from outside Europe and historical immigration from the eastern parts of the Empire?

I would hazard a guess that the immigrants from the eastern parts of the Empire viewed assimilation much more favorably than do modern immigrants from outside Europe.

I would also hazard a guess that Austrian socio-government was less tolerant of the resistance of immigrants from the eastern parts of the Empire towards assimilation than it is towards a similar resistance from today's immigrants.
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Sat 11 Oct, 2008 03:13 am
@Finn dAbuzz,
Finn dAbuzz wrote:

PS:

"Besides that," are you actually unable to distinguish between immigration from outside Europe and historical immigration from the eastern parts of the Empire?

I would hazard a guess that the immigrants from the eastern parts of the Empire viewed assimilation much more favorably than do modern immigrants from outside Europe.

I would also hazard a guess that Austrian socio-government was less tolerant of the resistance of immigrants from the eastern parts of the Empire towards assimilation than it is towards a similar resistance from today's immigrants.




With due respect, Finn: I don't understand that. All the (main) discussion in Austria is about immigrants from Serbia, Slovakia, Slovenia , Poland etc. .
(See explicitly Haider's actions and comments.)

And what is the "Austrian socio-government"?
0 Replies
 
joefromchicago
 
  1  
Reply Mon 13 Oct, 2008 11:45 am
End of the Road for Haider
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Mon 13 Oct, 2008 12:06 pm
http://i33.tinypic.com/91mmft.jpg
joefromchicago
 
  1  
Reply Mon 13 Oct, 2008 12:29 pm
@Walter Hinteler,
Frankly, I think everybody would much prefer to be in the opposition.
0 Replies
 
nimh
 
  2  
Reply Mon 13 Oct, 2008 10:49 pm
My take...

Quote:
Haider’s death offers little hope for the fight against the far right

Joefromchicago was straight on the case here yesterday to comment on the death of Jörg Haider, the charismatic far right leader who has left such an imprint on Austrian politics these last two decades.

Haider was the scourge of Austria, and his self-inflicted death by speeding will not be mourned by many democrats. Unfortunately though, his death does little to stop the renewed momentum for the extreme right in the country.

After suffering an electoral rout in 2002 and a bitter split in 2005, the Austrian far right has demonstrated its resilience, regrouping and coming right back up again to score its best elections result ever earlier this year. And the story of its resurgence offers a sobering lesson for those European democrats who believed that the far right could be defeated through cooptation. It provides a similar reality check for those who were still betting on the far right’s dependency on rare charismatic leaders.

Read more...
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Mon 13 Oct, 2008 11:41 pm
@nimh,
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Tue 14 Oct, 2008 02:54 am
@Walter Hinteler,
0 Replies
 
 

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