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Hacking

 
 
Dartboy
 
Reply Wed 6 Aug, 2008 05:46 am
If I have someones I.P Address can I hack there computer? This is purely a question out of interest to increase my knowledge of computers, I am not planning to hack anyone or anything, I just read a book where it was done and wodner if that was how it was done in real life and how exactly people hack people.
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Type: Discussion • Score: 6 • Views: 3,407 • Replies: 14
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contrex
 
  0  
Reply Wed 6 Aug, 2008 10:23 am
Nobody is going to tell you on here, just like nobody is going to tell you how cars are stolen or how drugs are made. Like, duh.
0 Replies
 
TTH
 
  -1  
Reply Wed 6 Aug, 2008 10:33 am
This is the ad at the top of the page. Hacker Degree Laughing

Learn Real Hacking Skills
Major in Network Security Master's, Bachelor's, Associate's
www.HackerDegree.com
0 Replies
 
DrewDad
 
  1  
Reply Wed 6 Aug, 2008 11:53 am
Re: Hacking
Dartboy wrote:
If I have someones I.P Address can I hack there computer? This is purely a question out of interest to increase my knowledge of computers, I am not planning to hack anyone or anything, I just read a book where it was done and wodner if that was how it was done in real life and how exactly people hack people.

It all depends on the device that you're trying to hack.

Some systems can be compromised easily; some systems can't be compromised at all.
0 Replies
 
FreeDuck
 
  1  
Reply Wed 6 Aug, 2008 12:16 pm
An IP address, by itself, isn't enough.
0 Replies
 
DrewDad
 
  1  
Reply Thu 7 Aug, 2008 04:50 pm
Can be, actually.

There are a variety of tools for fingerprinting a system to determine it's operating system and patch level, which you can then use to make focussed attacks.
0 Replies
 
TTH
 
  -1  
Reply Thu 7 Aug, 2008 09:44 pm
Ya, what DrewDad said......since it was done to me.
0 Replies
 
parados
 
  1  
Reply Thu 7 Aug, 2008 09:59 pm
DrewDad wrote:
Can be, actually.

There are a variety of tools for fingerprinting a system to determine it's operating system and patch level, which you can then use to make focussed attacks.

Of course the system has to be set up to accept outside communication.

Some systems are set up that way by default but most aren't so unless the person or organization set it up as a web server, telnet or SSH system and didn't pay attention to security simply having an IP address won't do much more than allow you to ping them.

There is a reason why most hacks come from virus programs people open rather than from just being connected online.
0 Replies
 
Rockhead
 
  1  
Reply Thu 7 Aug, 2008 10:05 pm
Ummm...

I'm not the brightest bulb in the box, but what is the point of edumacating or attracting wannabe "hackers"...

Somebody please point me to a positive...

Rolling Eyes

edit:

on A2K that is...
0 Replies
 
Dartboy
 
  1  
Reply Fri 8 Aug, 2008 02:22 am
Thanks for all the answers, They help me out abit, one more question

Next question :

Can I hack webcams with I.Ps?
0 Replies
 
Robert Gentel
 
  2  
Reply Fri 8 Aug, 2008 03:03 am
Re: Hacking
Dartboy wrote:
If I have someones I.P Address can I hack there computer?


An IP address is similar to a real world address in that your question is like asking "if I have a bank's address can I rob it?" and the answer is: it depends.

The IP address is just a network address to a computer. Usually, you can't compromise the computer without a vulnerability on it.

Quote:
This is purely a question out of interest to increase my knowledge of computers, I am not planning to hack anyone or anything, I just read a book where it was done and wodner if that was how it was done in real life and how exactly people hack people.


In the past, hackers were often curious people such as yourself (albeit with much more knowledge on the subject) who hacked for the challenge.

Today, hacking is largely automated and commercial. Within the last 6 years the hacking landscape is now dominated by:

Phishing: this is a social engineering hack where scammers trick people into giving them information (such as their paypal login to use a common example).

Automated Vulnerability Scanning: infected computers now often run programs that attempt to infect random computers. They send the attacks at every IP they can discover and hope that they get through on an unpatched computer (e.g. a computer without much security and that is not updated with the latest security fixes).

Drive by malware install: when there are security bugs in the browsers, attacks will often surface where visiting a page will cause an exploit. The payload is usually just spyware but can be anything if the exploit grants root access.

Data encryption blackmail: here malware is placed on a compromised computer that encrypts the user's files and blackmails them for the key. e.g. "You have two days to send us $100 or we delete all your photos."

There are a lot of other things going on but those are some of the most prevalent. And they are often paired or chained. For example, maybe the browser exploit will do the data blackmail. Or maybe it will install a keystroke logger and do the identity theft fraud gig.

But here's what you really need to know: you can't just hack through anything. No matter how good the hacker they need a hole. In the past everything had a lot of holes and hackers were the curious geeks who knew enough to find them but now all of this is automated and any kid can find the exploits online. They can then try using them (they are called "script kiddies" when they do, as they understand nothing about it but can sometimes hack someone just by copying and pasting a script) but the surface of attack changes with every patch.

So modern hacking means bot nets and a lot of automated attempts to get an old unpatched box every now and then. Because of all boring repetitive work it's no longer the realm of creative curious folk. After all, it's boring to have a script try an exploit over and over on random computers. So now it's dominated by scammers and thieves who do it for money.

contrex wrote:
Nobody is going to tell you on here, just like nobody is going to tell you how cars are stolen or how drugs are made. Like, duh.


Why don't you just say you don't know anything about it instead of claiming nobody else will talk about this? This is a legitimate field of study and how computer security experts are born.

"Security through obscurity" doesn't work and just about all the major players in the tech world have long understood this by now.

Responsible disclosure is now the widely accepted practice.


Rockhead wrote:

I'm not the brightest bulb in the box, but what is the point of edumacating or attracting wannabe "hackers"...


Because the information is all out there and pushed out there to help people patch their boxes. And because most of the security experts were wannabe hackers at some time.

I have only once hacked a server that was not mine, but in my youth I was always very curious about it. This led to a lot of knowledge about how to stop it (which is more fun and more challenging since you have to be right all the time and they only have to be right once) and this has served me well in my work.

This kid isn't going to learn exactly how to hack anything here unless we start posting simple exploits and even then it would only work on systems without their updates. Hacking isn't like what most people imagine and just about all the information is out there in simple exploit scripts and proof of concept code.

For any of it to work, the computer can't be patched. And the information is pushed out there to get the security patches. So the only real dangerous information is a zero day exploit. That is, a way to compromise a computer that is published (or used) before any patch is made.

The responsible hackers follow this procedure:

1) Find hole.
2) Notify the vendor (e.g. Microsoft) about the hole
3) Give the vendor a reasonable chance to patch the code
4) Publish the exploit. This often happens with the blessing of the vendor, as the larger ones have learned to credit the security researchers (i.e. hackers).

This is a important field of study and he's not going to become dangerous by learning any of these basics to hacking. All the very explicit detail is already all over the net. Not just in the hacking world but on famous security sites.


Dartboy wrote:
Thanks for all the answers, They help me out abit, one more question

Next question :

Can I hack webcams with I.Ps?


Same as the above question. We already asked if you could break into a bank with their street address, now you are asking if you can break into a TV station with theirs.

No. Breaking in requires a hole (like an unlocked door) or brute force (like a dictionary attack). And the thing is, in modern applications if you can get in at all it's considered to have a hole most of the time.

So the basic way to understand this is that you can only get in if they didn't lock the door. Today hacking isn't about picking a target and getting through. That would just be lucky. It usually means scanning random computers and finding one with a door open.

It doesn't take much skill, it just takes an unpatched computer. And computers like that, without security patches, firewalls or whatnot are being hacked within minutes by the big bot nets anyway.

Malicious hacking doesn't usually take much skill. It basically consists of finding a computer without the hole patched. It's not about being good enough to get in (like in the dramatization of hacking), it's about the computer being wide open and finding it.
0 Replies
 
SkidMaRkS19
 
  1  
Reply Mon 9 Mar, 2009 01:20 pm
@Dartboy,
no you dont get there i.p adress you have to stumble onto someones wierless rotar and kinda steal the internet signal and people do all there hacking threw other peoples internet because they dont want it to be on theres and get cought...!
0 Replies
 
Susmariosep
 
  0  
Reply Sun 21 Jan, 2018 12:19 pm
@Dartboy,
It is impossible the way I see it, to totally prevent hackers from invading for example a website like able2know.org, the present website which hosts this forum where you and I and every registered members are engaged in exchange of ideas.

In my case, I am troubled that this a2k website is already invaded by at least one hacker, because one of my posts in a thread which I started got deleted.

There could be other posts from me deleted by him, but I don't know it because I could not be checking all my posts all the time.

But this post that got hacked and got deleted, it is a very important post from me against a poster, who is what I call a most unreasonable thinker and writer if ever in a discussion.

That is one reason why hackers want to infest a website or even just a person appearing and doing in the internet or the world wide web his daily activities, namely, to delete posts he the hacker does not like.

For example, with a hacker member of this a2k website, when he does not like a post from another member he will just delete it - which is what has happened to me

Let me read your comments, Oh ye who happen to come to his post from me.
hightor
 
  2  
Reply Sun 21 Jan, 2018 12:57 pm
@Susmariosep,
You're replying to someone who hasn't posted since 2008.

You might want to ask a moderator to delete this post for you.
Susmariosep
 
  -1  
Reply Mon 22 Jan, 2018 05:37 pm
@hightor,
Do you have any help to extend to me?

If not for now, suppose as I seem to imagine you to be an old hand here and also you might know about hacking, have there ever been posters here thrown out for hacking posts here?
0 Replies
 
 

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