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Good revision techniques

 
 
Gilbey
 
Reply Fri 22 Feb, 2008 01:49 pm
This isn't so much a post about a philosophical issue, so much as is it a post about an issue relating to philosophy.

Does anyone have any suggestions of any good revision methods for A level philosophy?

Should I just be doing practice questions?

What works best for you?
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Type: Discussion • Score: 1 • Views: 510 • Replies: 8
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Shapeless
 
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Reply Fri 22 Feb, 2008 05:09 pm
What exactly is being revised?
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Gilbey
 
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Reply Sun 24 Feb, 2008 02:34 pm
The theory of knowledge

Philosophy of religion

Hume, Descartes, Russel etc...
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Shapeless
 
  1  
Reply Sun 24 Feb, 2008 03:53 pm
I'm not sure I understand. You are trying to revise Hume, Descartes, and Russell? "To revise" means to look over and correct; are you trying to do editorial work for Hume? Perhaps you are using the word "revise" in an unconventional way?
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aidan
 
  1  
Reply Sun 24 Feb, 2008 03:56 pm
Shapeless, in the British eduational system, to revise means to study- as in study for a test.

Gilbey, hasn't your philosophy tutor given you revision guides for his/her course?
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Shapeless
 
  1  
Reply Sun 24 Feb, 2008 04:12 pm
Ah... that makes much more sense. Sorry for the confusion.
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aidan
 
  1  
Reply Sun 24 Feb, 2008 04:39 pm
Yes, and a paper is an exam - not an essay or research paper-

So, one might say, "I have to revise for this paper."
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Gilbey
 
  1  
Reply Mon 25 Feb, 2008 11:49 am
My tutor has given me some advice, but I just thought I would ask on here anyway.
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aidan
 
  1  
Reply Mon 25 Feb, 2008 12:04 pm
I've never studied philosophy - at all really - so I'm no help as far as content goes.

In terms of study skills - I guess I'd ask what exam format you're looking at. Is it multiple choice, essay, short answer?

I didn't do A-levels (I was in America for high school and university)- so I haven't got a clue. Are they objective/standardized tests- or are they more of a written/subjective answer type test?

If you've been given practise questions- I'd definitely look over those and use my notes to actually write out answers. Reading the information and then formulating your answer into a cohesive and condensed outline which you then use to write your practice paper is the first step. Then, actually reading your paper out loud will help to imprint the information on your brain.

Reading, hearing, writing, and then you yourself actually saying the information is always a good study technique and a good way to integrate the information into the fund of knowledge you want to be able to retrieve without notes.

I'd ask your tutor to help you figure out what would be your best method of preparation. If s/he didn't want to tell you, if s/he wanted you to figure it out on your own - I'd say something like, "Well, this is what I was thinking....and then explain your thoughts and ask, "Am I headed in the right direction?"

That's what I always do when someone asks me a question, I ask, "Well, tell me what you're thinking- and I'll tell you if you're on the right track."
Your teacher wants to see you take the initiative - but they also want to see you succeed.

Good luck!
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