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Classical anyone?

 
 
JPB
 
  1  
Reply Thu 7 Feb, 2008 07:11 am
Tico -- thanks, I haven't heard Disco Mountain in, er...., a very long time.

2packs -- that was a new one for me. good one!


A more traditional Beethoven --

Symphony No. 9 : Part 1
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O2AEaQJuKDY

Part 2
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cSEqQsAXbJw&feature=related
0 Replies
 
Shapeless
 
  1  
Reply Fri 8 Feb, 2008 12:07 am
Steve Reich's Clapping Music

... and a "conceptual" performance of Reich's Clapping Music, which is interesting only for about the first two minutes or so, but is pretty cool nonetheless.
0 Replies
 
JPB
 
  1  
Reply Fri 8 Feb, 2008 08:14 am
I had the same feeling about the middle of the metronome -- beginning and end were cool but it was too long.
0 Replies
 
coluber2001
 
  1  
Reply Fri 8 Feb, 2008 01:11 pm
Regarding the cello, I like the Shostakovich Cello Concerto #1.
0 Replies
 
JPB
 
  1  
Reply Fri 8 Feb, 2008 03:49 pm
coluber2001 wrote:
Regarding the cello, I like the Shostakovich Cello Concerto #1.


Welcome, coluber. Here it is...

Part 1
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6pyaPlvae5k&feature=related

Part 2
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-Ggnnbdybdk&feature=related

Part 3
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uXZRYN0BrYo&feature=related

Part 4
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7gcPgib1NFw&feature=related

Part 5
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SQpoVU-pp94&feature=related

Quote:
Dmitri Dmitriyevich Shostakovich listen (September 25 [O.S. September 12] 1906 - August 9, 1975) was a Russian composer of the Soviet period.

Shostakovich had a complex and difficult relationship with the Soviet government, suffering two official denunciations of his music, in 1936 and 1948, and the periodic banning of his work. At the same time, he received a number of accolades and state awards and served in the Supreme Soviet. Despite the official controversy, his works were popular; he is now held to be, as Grove's judges him, the most talented Soviet composer of his generation.[1]

After a period influenced by Prokofiev and Stravinsky (Symphony No. 1), Shostakovich switched to modernism (Symphony No. 2 and The Nose) before developing a hybrid of styles with Lady Macbeth and the state-suppressed Fourth Symphony. This hybrid style ranged from the neo-classical (with Stravinskian influences) to the post-romantic music (with Mahlerian influences). His tonality involved much use of modality and some astringent neo-classical harmonies à la Hindemith and Prokofiev. His music frequently includes sharp contrasts and elements of the grotesque.

Shostakovich prided himself on his orchestration, which is clear, economical, and well-projected. This aspect of Shostakovich's technique owes more to Gustav Mahler than Rimsky-Korsakov. His greatest works are generally considered to be his symphonies and string quartets, fifteen of each. Other works include operas, six concertos, and a substantial quantity of film music. David Fanning concludes in Grove that, "Amid the conflicting pressures of official requirements, the mass suffering of his fellow countrymen, and his personal ideals of humanitarian and public service, he succeeded in forging a musical language of colossal emotional power."[2] Shostakovich is now regarded as "the most popular composer of serious art music of the middle years of the 20th century".[3] Wiki source
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Fri 8 Feb, 2008 03:56 pm
One of the more obscure but beautiful cello pieces is the Bachiana brasileira number five, for soprano and eight cellos. The composer, Heitor Villa-Lobos, was re-writing Bach with the influences of Brazilian music (hence, Bachianas brasileiras--Brazilian Bach pieces). The number five is my favorite of them all, although it sadly does not always get performed with the eight cellos as it was orginally scored. Of course, most orchestras don't have eight cello players to begin with, but that is merely a detail. If i can find a performance online, i'll post a link.
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Fri 8 Feb, 2008 04:18 pm
If you go to this page at YouTube, you can hear a performance of the Bachiana braziliera number five by the Ukranian soprano Irina Vasilieva. It takes me a while for these downloads on dial-up, so i can't say if this recording has the cello accompaniment or not.
0 Replies
 
JPB
 
  1  
Reply Fri 8 Feb, 2008 04:26 pm
Thanks, Set. That one has a piano accompaniment. This one is accompanied by a single cello.

Beautiful piece...
0 Replies
 
JPB
 
  1  
Reply Fri 8 Feb, 2008 04:28 pm
I found one with 8 cellos but the recording quality isn't very good.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1EGrXZQ1o4g&feature=related
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Fri 8 Feb, 2008 04:33 pm
Yeah, i have now discovered the evil pianist lurking in the background behind Miss Taranova (boy, that girl has a lot of hair!). If you can get a good recording, i recommend it. The effect of the cellos with a competent soprano (and she has to be good for that one), is very striking. A piano just don't get it--the effect is not the same.
0 Replies
 
Shapeless
 
  1  
Reply Fri 8 Feb, 2008 04:35 pm
Quote:
After a period influenced by Prokofiev and Stravinsky (Symphony No. 1), Shostakovich switched to modernism (Symphony No. 2 and The Nose) before developing a hybrid of styles with Lady Macbeth and the state-suppressed Fourth Symphony.


I will double-check this, and it's a relatively small detail anyway, but I don't think Shostakovich's Fourth Symphony was officially state-suppressed; rather, Shosty personally withdrew it from performance in the aftermath of the scandal over Lady Macbeth. If anything, it was the latter that was state-suppressed: after attending a performance of it in 1936, Stalin officially denounced it as degenerate, leading to the infamous, life-altering Pravda article.
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Fri 8 Feb, 2008 04:36 pm
Oooo . . . thank you, thank you, little flower. I really love Hayley Westenra . . . er, platonicly, of course . . .
0 Replies
 
JPB
 
  1  
Reply Sat 9 Feb, 2008 08:45 am
switching instruments for a bit...

Glass - Concerto for Saxophone and Orchestra
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qpvh87eGWKA&feature=related

Tomasi - Concerto for Saxophone and Orchestra
part 1 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YnxEd_ANKUg
part 2 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CRYxSfoAJJY&feature=related

Selections from the 14th World Saxophone Congress
D. Gauther- http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VNNwHhqRRUk&feature=related

V. David- http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V-hwx9SiBXA&feature=related
0 Replies
 
2PacksAday
 
  1  
Reply Sat 9 Feb, 2008 10:25 pm
Something a bit different.

Apocalyptica - The Unforgiven

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xqUXDdJ3C-c

They have added a drummer to the line up since this video was made....besides doing Metallica covers, they also do a pretty heavy version of Grieg's...In the Hall of the Mountain King...there is a video on Youtube of a that song, but it does not load well.
0 Replies
 
JPB
 
  1  
Reply Sun 10 Feb, 2008 09:17 am
wow -- that was beautiful, 2packs, thanks!
0 Replies
 
Shapeless
 
  1  
Reply Sun 10 Feb, 2008 01:49 pm
A couple of Glenn Gould gems:

Bach's Art of Fugue, Contrapunctus 1

Beethoven's Piano Sonata No. 3 in E, last movement

Bach's Brandenburg 5, on piano: Part 1, Part 2, Part 3
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Mon 11 Feb, 2008 05:39 pm
2PacksAday wrote:
. . . besides doing Metallica covers, they also do a pretty heavy version of Grieg's...In the Hall of the Mountain King. . .


I've known a lot of metal heads who are fond of that portion of the Peer Gynt suite. I don't get it. What's the attraction?
0 Replies
 
joefromchicago
 
  1  
Reply Tue 12 Feb, 2008 08:20 am
NPR discovers classical music on YouTube.
0 Replies
 
JPB
 
  1  
Reply Thu 14 Feb, 2008 07:22 am
For Valentine's Day

A Thousand Years of Love
http://youtube.com/watch?v=JMnyre-KXf0
0 Replies
 
2PacksAday
 
  1  
Reply Thu 14 Feb, 2008 05:53 pm
Setanta wrote:
2PacksAday wrote:
. . . besides doing Metallica covers, they also do a pretty heavy version of Grieg's...In the Hall of the Mountain King. . .


I've known a lot of metal heads who are fond of that portion of the Peer Gynt suite. I don't get it. What's the attraction?


I am far from being considered a metal head, but I would guess it has something to do with the very simple chord structure of the main "riff" of Mountain King...that, and it just has a dire sound to it.
0 Replies
 
 

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