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Classical anyone?

 
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  2  
Reply Sun 3 Feb, 2008 03:13 pm
joefromchicago wrote:
As for the cello, the solo repertoire is not extensive. That's probably because there weren't a whole lot of cello virtuosi running around Europe in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries.


Two children of some friends choose cello as their instrument (independently), because it was the largest instrument you still could cycle with :wink:
0 Replies
 
Shapeless
 
  1  
Reply Sun 3 Feb, 2008 03:17 pm
Phoenix32890 wrote:
Shapeless- I attampted to research the contention that Tchaikovsky committed suicide, but was faced with conflicting reports.


Interestingly, Grove's Dictionary, the source that the passage above refers to, has flip-flopped on the issue itself. As the article mentions, the 1954 edition of the dictionary acknowledges the lack of definitive proof; then David Brown's expanded entry for the 1980 edition claimed that the suicide could not be doubted; now the 2001 edition (in which the Chaikovksy entry is written by Roland John Wiley) has gone back to the original position: "The polemics over his death have reached an impasse, one side supporting a biographer not invariably committed to the truth, the other advocating something preposterous by the mores of the day. Neither version withstands scrutiny, making all conclusions provisional... We do not know how Tchaikovsky died. We may never find out..."

For the most part it seems like a matter of minimal importance, but it's been a tremendously important debate within musical scholarship and has had a direct impact on the way scholars evaluate his music (though it's had little effect on general listeners, for whom Chaikovsky's canonical status is pretty near unassailable). Those who dislike Chaikovsky have found it useful to use the suicide theory as an indication that his symphonies are laden with emotional baggage at the expense of substantive technical proficiency; some antagonistic scholars even used to claim that his suicide, coupled with the broader issue of his sexuality, meant that his music was "tainted" and pathologically dangerous to listen to. On the other hand, those who champion Chaikovsky use the suicide story as a way of turning the symphonies into poignant autobiographical stories that enhance the appeal of the music. (This is basically the same view as the anti-Chaikovsky stance, except that the emotional content is now considered a good thing.) This is why the suicide has remained inconclusive... it's been very difficult for scholars to treat the matter as an objective historical issue rather than as ammunition for subjective opinions about the quality of Chaikovksy's music.
0 Replies
 
Shapeless
 
  1  
Reply Sun 3 Feb, 2008 04:11 pm
Anyway, back to the thread: here's Hilary Hahn playing a virtuosic violin transcription of Schubert's "Der Erlkönig".
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Phoenix32890
 
  1  
Reply Sun 3 Feb, 2008 04:31 pm
Shapeless wrote:
On the other hand, those who champion Chaikovsky use the suicide story as a way of turning the symphonies into poignant autobiographical stories that enhance the appeal of the music.


That is where I stand vis a vis the entire issue. I have always been fascinated with the lives of both authors and composers. After all, the creativity that springs from these people comes from their minds, which are shaped by their life experiences.
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Sun 3 Feb, 2008 04:42 pm
I've liked Janos Starker and Jacqueline duPre, with no idea re their relative virtues. Back with links if I find them.
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ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Sun 3 Feb, 2008 05:01 pm
du Pre, re Wiki -

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jacqueline_du_Pré
(I have the EMI Elgar)


Wiki on Janos Starker - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/János_Starker
0 Replies
 
Shapeless
 
  1  
Reply Sun 3 Feb, 2008 08:31 pm
Here's Bernstein conducting and playing the shimmering second movement of Ravel's Piano Concerto in G.
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Phoenix32890
 
  1  
Reply Mon 4 Feb, 2008 06:05 am
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ujqSTGKYLLw

This is the beginning of Carmina Burana by Carl Orff. Would you believe that I once attempted to learn the entire libretto of this piece? To see this performed in person is absolutely stunning!
0 Replies
 
JPB
 
  1  
Reply Mon 4 Feb, 2008 08:56 am
Letty wrote:
Great thread, JPB.

Phoenix, then if what you said is true, that would explain the sad lament.

None but the lonely heart
Can know my sadness
Alone and parted
Far from joy and gladness
Heaven's boundless arch I see
Spread out above me
O(h) what a distance drear to one
Who loves me
None but the lonely heart
Can know my sadness
Alone and parted
Far from joy and gladness
Alone and parted far
From joy and gladness
My senses fail
A burning fire
Devours me
None but the lonely heart
Can know my sadness

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aFVme4hxt4E


That is a beautiful piece, Letty.
0 Replies
 
JPB
 
  1  
Reply Mon 4 Feb, 2008 09:08 am
joefromchicago wrote:
... Now I'm a huge fan of chamber music.

As for the cello, the solo repertoire is not extensive. That's probably because there weren't a whole lot of cello virtuosi running around Europe in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. There are, of course, the Beethoven cello sonatas (here's Rostropovich playing one).


Glad you're here, joe. I too enjoy chamber music. Kim and I generally try to pick chamber performances over symphony when we can. That Beethoven sonata was terrific, thanks.
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Mon 4 Feb, 2008 10:14 am
A lot of (re-) sources for classical music are to be found on this massive compilation from librarian Dave Mattison: Music to Soothe the Savage Searcher: Classical Music Databases and Web Resources
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Shapeless
 
  1  
Reply Mon 4 Feb, 2008 03:29 pm
Another handy resource, including articles, reviews, and historical informations, is Classical Net.
0 Replies
 
JPB
 
  1  
Reply Mon 4 Feb, 2008 03:35 pm
Shapeless wrote:
In the realm of nineteenth century chamber music, it's tough to beat Mendelssohn. My favorite is the D-Minor Trio. (Here's an amateur performance of the gorgeous second movement).

Other random chamber music gems on YouTube:

Poulenc's Sextet, first movement

Poulenc's Flute Sonata, first movement

Hindemith's Flute Sonata, first movement

Shostakovich's Trio No. 2, fourth movement

Bartok's String Quartet No. 4, fourth movement


Thank you -- I particularly liked the Shostavkovich and Bartok. I gave my daughter a complete collection of Shostakovich's string quartets (Emerson SQ) for her birthday last year.

No. 8 is a personal favorite --

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IXGHEgmSHW4&feature=related

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E1ShznI0-AM
0 Replies
 
JPB
 
  1  
Reply Mon 4 Feb, 2008 03:39 pm
Kim says this is her favorite Shostakovich -- No 8 in C Minor 2nd MVT

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PjvTTfbpWjY
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JPB
 
  1  
Reply Mon 4 Feb, 2008 03:44 pm
Phoenix32890 wrote:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ujqSTGKYLLw

This is the beginning of Carmina Burana by Carl Orff. Would you believe that I once attempted to learn the entire libretto of this piece? To see this performed in person is absolutely stunning!


With her back to me, Kim just heard the first three bars of this and said, "That's Carmina Burana!" Very Happy
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Mon 4 Feb, 2008 03:50 pm
Shapeless wrote:
Another handy resource, including articles, reviews, and historical informations, is Classical Net.

Dave Mattison (my link) says:
Quote:
I could simultaneously query the AllClassical [http://www.allclassical.com, part of AllMusic.com], the APC Music Society (Appreciating Classical Music Society), Classical.net [http://www.classical.net], and Tim's Classical Music Database under the composers category.
0 Replies
 
Shapeless
 
  1  
Reply Mon 4 Feb, 2008 06:13 pm
Here's an amusingly (if also pretentiously) theatrical video of Ligeti's Piano Etude No. 13, "The Devil's Staircase".
0 Replies
 
Ticomaya
 
  1  
Reply Wed 6 Feb, 2008 09:28 pm
Classical Disco ...


A Fifth of Beethoven


A Night on Disco Mountain
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2PacksAday
 
  1  
Reply Thu 7 Feb, 2008 01:33 am
I don't care for the harp so much...but it's still a good version of the song.

Palladio

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E5jtKuQeq0w
0 Replies
 
JPB
 
  1  
Reply Thu 7 Feb, 2008 07:06 am
Shapeless wrote:
Here's an amusingly (if also pretentiously) theatrical video of Ligeti's Piano Etude No. 13, "The Devil's Staircase".


More Ligeti...

Symphonic Poem for 100 Metronomes
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X8v-uDhcDyg&feature=related

cello solo sonata 2nd mov
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=47WlUOB2vJ8&feature=related
0 Replies
 
 

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