305
   

What BOOK are you reading right now?

 
 
hightor
 
  1  
Reply Wed 2 Dec, 2020 02:36 pm
Barchester Towers by Anthony Trollope
0 Replies
 
roger
 
  1  
Reply Wed 2 Dec, 2020 02:56 pm
Cabbages and Kings.

Well, the library is closed, maybe for the duration. Anyhow, I'm having to grab anything off my shelves that hasn't been read in the past decade.
0 Replies
 
Roberta
 
  4  
Reply Wed 2 Dec, 2020 05:18 pm
I'm reading a mystery by Ian Rankin.I've been working my way through his John Rebus series in chronological order. These books tend be dark and complicated, as is Rebus.
roger
 
  1  
Reply Wed 2 Dec, 2020 07:50 pm
@Roberta,
I've read a bunch of Rankin's stuff. I never worry much about chronological order. Usually an impossibility when working with our public library.
0 Replies
 
Borat Sister
 
  1  
Reply Wed 2 Dec, 2020 08:20 pm
@Roberta,
I’ve liked the bit of Rankin I’ve read
0 Replies
 
hingehead
 
  1  
Reply Thu 3 Dec, 2020 05:21 pm
Halfway through
https://www.booktopia.com.au/http_coversbooktopiacomau/big/9781460757765/8012/boy-swallows-universe.webp

It's great!
0 Replies
 
Juicy
 
  1  
Reply Tue 15 Dec, 2020 08:51 am
I’ve read most of book called "Little Women" by Louise May Alcott. The novel is about four sisters, their life, friendship, growing up. In short, for me it’s a one-time book. Of course, today the book will seem very boring for modern young girls. There is not even a storyline here. Description of their boring measured life, their worries, children's desires. Although it would be useful for them to read, because children's selfishness is still relevant today. This book is also suitable for a more adult female audience, there is something to think about child-rearing. The story is not modern at all, and the book is not very exciting, but I do not regret having read it. A recommendation only for lovers of women's classics.
coluber2001
 
  1  
Reply Tue 15 Dec, 2020 04:44 pm
@Juicy,
The 2019 film is quite good, but I haven't read the book.
https://i.ebayimg.com/images/g/jdgAAOSwwjVe4Lxc/s-l300.jpg
0 Replies
 
Ragman
 
  1  
Reply Wed 16 Dec, 2020 03:21 pm
“Shoe Dog” by Phil Knight, entrepreneur and charitable philanthropist evolving from 1962 to present day.

The story of the man who built (from the ground up) Nike shoes and fitness clothing into a billion-dollar industry. More than a story for running geeks, an amazing story about a singleminded individual with vision and passion.

My significant other and I are reading it to one another at bedtime.
BillW
 
  1  
Reply Wed 16 Dec, 2020 05:51 pm
@Ragman,
Ragman wrote:

“Shoe Dog” by Phil Knight, entrepreneur and charitable philanthropist evolving from 1962 to present day.

The story of the man who built (from the ground up) Nike shoes and fitness clothing into a billion-dollar industry. More than a story for running geeks, an amazing story about a singleminded individual with vision and passion.

My significant other and I are reading it to one another at bedtime.

I tried that once; trading out reading to one another in bed. Never could get much reading done - after a couple of paragraph we would just stop and; uuuuhhhhhh, stop reading. Never did get that book read!😖😜🙄
Ragman
 
  1  
Reply Sat 19 Dec, 2020 06:21 am
@BillW,
You dog, you!
0 Replies
 
hightor
 
  1  
Reply Sat 19 Dec, 2020 07:36 am
Transit of Venus by Shirley Hazzard

Not my usual fare, I was intrigued by this review in the New Yorker. It's slow going but the occasionally unconventional use of language is both effective and surprising.
0 Replies
 
Rebelofnj
 
  1  
Reply Sat 19 Dec, 2020 08:42 am
The Woodcutter by Kate Danley

I have been going through my e-book collection and I apparently bought this in a spending spree.
It is about a guardian of an enchanted forest where other fairy tales intersect. Honestly, it is not very good. To me, it is a poorer version of The Witcher, which I did read earlier this year. It doesn't help that the lead character doesn't have much of a personality.

Another thing I don't like about the book is that there are far too many chapter breaks. Some of them are barely a page long. As a result, there are 79 chapters in a 337 page book.
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Sat 19 Dec, 2020 11:19 am
@Rebelofnj,
sounds like the author writes like Elmore Leonard did.
0 Replies
 
Nensysun
 
  0  
Reply Thu 24 Dec, 2020 10:57 am
Reading "Smart Money Woman".
0 Replies
 
olive55
 
  0  
Reply Fri 5 Mar, 2021 09:50 am
I’ve read a book called "Little Women" by Louise May Alcott. The novel is about four sisters, their life, friendship, growing up. In short, for me it’s a one-time book. Of course, today the book will seem very boring for modern young girls. There is not even a storyline here. Description of their boring measured life, their worries, children's desires. Although it would be useful for them to read, because children's selfishness is still relevant today. This book is also suitable for a more adult female audience, there is something to think about child-rearing. The story is not modern at all, and the book is not very exciting, but I do not regret having read it. A recommendation only for lovers of women's classics.
roger
 
  1  
Reply Fri 5 Mar, 2021 10:16 am
@olive55,
I had to read that in high school. Same opinion, and like you, I do not regret it, either.

As a side note, when we think of civil war nursing, the name is always Clara Barton. Alcott was there, too, and that was back when nursing was considered a pretty low class field.
hightor
 
  1  
Reply Fri 5 Mar, 2021 10:39 am
Phineas Finn by Anthony Trollope
0 Replies
 
BillW
 
  1  
Reply Fri 5 Mar, 2021 09:58 pm
@roger,
How about Ernst Hemingway?
roger
 
  1  
Reply Fri 5 Mar, 2021 10:55 pm
@BillW,
I only read one of his, involving the Spanish civil war, and that was long after high school. I didn't quite adapt to the dialog.
 

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