287
   

What BOOK are you reading right now?

 
 
plainoldme
 
  2  
Reply Sun 11 Jan, 2015 11:03 pm
@hingehead,
First, Europeans, who once knew how to make paper, rediscovered how to make paper. What to do with the paper? That question pushed the development of movable type. Once there was type, words could be put into larger circulation. Business changed as well because it was easier to keep records, etc.

There is some debate among academics as to how literate people were in earlier times. It is generally held that more people than once thought had minimal literacy. Shakespeare provides a way into the matter. The Anti-Avonians say that Shakespeare was illiterate but the pro-Shakespeare people discuss the curriculum of English grammar schools during his lifetime which was quite intellectual. He was born about 130 years after the invention of movable type. So, make a timeline between Gutenberg and Will's grade school years and things look just about right.

Recently, I wondered if Shakespeare had Hamlet attend Wittenberg whether because Luther taught at Wittenberg.
Lustig Andrei
 
  1  
Reply Mon 12 Jan, 2015 01:04 am
@plainoldme,
plainoldme wrote:

Don't forget Guttenberg had something to do with Luther's success.


Yes, as I said the times they were a-changing.
0 Replies
 
Lustig Andrei
 
  3  
Reply Mon 12 Jan, 2015 01:08 am
@plainoldme,
Quote:
Recently, I wondered if Shakespeare had Hamlet attend Wittenberg whether because Luther taught at Wittenberg.


I'm sure of it. In Shakespeare's day Wittenberg was code. His audience immediately understood the connotation.
plainoldme
 
  1  
Reply Tue 13 Jan, 2015 07:25 pm
@Lustig Andrei,
Thanks for that tip. I'm certain that a great many things in Shakespeare's plays were "the talk of the town."
0 Replies
 
Kolyo
 
  1  
Reply Thu 15 Jan, 2015 02:15 am
@raisingirl,
(@all)

raisingirl wrote:

I'm reading The Count of Monte Cristo.


During my teenage years and my early twenties I read dozens of "classics" about heroic men and (outwardly, at least) lyrically beautiful women.

I read the classics because I thought they were the best the human race had to offer.

I stopped reading almost entirely when I realized I wasn't going do anything heroic like those men, who suddenly made me acutely jealous of their epic lives, rather than offering inspiration. I also wanted female characters to be something more than just the romantic interest of the story. They had to more than just pretty.

Now I mainly read scifi novels by women about women, because I never feel the need compare myself with the heroines or wish that I could become them, because that would just be ... weird.

===

Anyhow, my "book du jour" from that genre is Rediscovery by Marion Zimmer Bradley and Mercedes Lackey. Amazing speculative look at what happens when a medieval culture meets people from outerspace.
0 Replies
 
littlek
 
  6  
Reply Mon 19 Jan, 2015 12:28 pm
I'm reading not a god damned thing. I got a kindle a year ago, devoured many books, then figured out I could play games on it. Sad .
Lustig Andrei
 
  2  
Reply Mon 19 Jan, 2015 12:35 pm
@littlek,
Another good reason for me not to get a Kindle.
0 Replies
 
George
 
  1  
Reply Mon 19 Jan, 2015 12:42 pm
'K!
<spin>
<thud>
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Mon 19 Jan, 2015 01:36 pm
@littlek,
Made me laugh..
but I figure you will get back to reading at some point.
In a way, a2k and the blogs I look at and fantasy sports pull me away from reading (as such) too.

Right now I'm reading Blue Blood, a non fiction book about becoming and being a policeman in New York City, by Edward Conlon. Fascinating. I'm only about 1/4 the way through it, learning a lot. He's a pretty thoughtful writer.

Next up is Rome, also non fiction, by the Australian art and culture critic, Robert Hughes. "A cultural.. visual.. and personal history."



Have missed you a lot.
0 Replies
 
littlek
 
  8  
Reply Wed 21 Jan, 2015 06:19 pm
It's good to be back. I hope to make more of a habit of it.
hawkeye10
 
  1  
Reply Wed 21 Jan, 2015 06:28 pm
@littlek,
littlek wrote:

It's good to be back. I hope to make more of a habit of it.

YAY!
0 Replies
 
Krrypton
 
  1  
Reply Sat 24 Jan, 2015 08:13 am
Fifty shades of grey.
0 Replies
 
glitterbag
 
  2  
Reply Sun 25 Jan, 2015 07:07 pm
I just finished reading "Tinsletown" by William J. Mann. It's the retelling of the murder of William Desmond Taylor in 1922 Hollywood. I've always been interested in the early days of film making, but this book is crammed with information about that period. Officially the murder was never solved, but this book narrowed down the suspects and has an interesting theory about the possible participants.
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Sun 25 Jan, 2015 08:23 pm
@glitterbag,
I'm interested since my father became a film cutter (editor) in 1926 or 1927.
glitterbag
 
  2  
Reply Sun 25 Jan, 2015 10:57 pm
@ossobuco,
Oh it would still be a scandal when your Dad was a film cutter. Quite a few notables at the time. Mabel Norman was one of his best friends, lots of info on Famous Players-Laskey, Adolph Zukor, Olive Thomas, Mary Miles Minter and her ominous mother Mrs. Shelby. It doesn't cover all of the pioneers of early film, but Mack Sennett and his studio/films/comedies are mentioned. This book, I think, is the first time I've ever read that he and Mabel Norman were a thing. Tinseltown was just released in 2014 by William J. Mann,

It's about 480 pages stuffed full of background, morphine use, church ladies, and everything else that's interesting about the era.
izzythepush
 
  2  
Reply Mon 26 Jan, 2015 04:39 am
@glitterbag,
I've just finished Look Who's Back by Timur Vermes, a German book in translation. It's a satire on Hitler. Hitler appears in Berlin in 2012, how/why is never explained. Hitler is recognised, but as a method actor who refuses to break character. He gets his own "comedy" show and becomes a Youtube sensation. I wouldn't say it's wildly funny, but it's definitely worth a read.

This is a Guardian review.

http://www.theguardian.com/books/2014/apr/30/look-whos-back-timur-vermes-review
Andrea-Kate
 
  1  
Reply Thu 29 Jan, 2015 04:05 am
I'm reading Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix)
roger
 
  2  
Reply Thu 29 Jan, 2015 04:10 am
@littlek,
I hope you do, too.
0 Replies
 
roger
 
  1  
Reply Thu 29 Jan, 2015 04:12 am
@Andrea-Kate,
That was the first I read. Then I went through the others in no particular. JK Rowling has written a couple of detective stories under the name of something like Robert Galbreath. Not bad, but being British there isn't much of a body count.
tsarstepan
 
  1  
Reply Wed 25 Feb, 2015 11:51 am
@roger,
I finished the audiobook version of Nathan Philbrick's In the Heart of the Sea: The Tragedy of the Whaleship Essex.

Listening to The Three-Body Problem by Cixin Liu. Not an easy listen as my understanding of physics is a tad weak and the Chinese names are a bit overwhelming to distinguish for a westerner's ears.
0 Replies
 
 

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