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What BOOK are you reading right now?

 
 
mismi
 
  1  
Reply Thu 13 Jan, 2011 10:52 pm
@ossobuco,
I decided to read Love in the Time of Cholera. Just picked it up today...I think it will be depressing. It was on Oprah's book list though...so
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Thu 13 Jan, 2011 11:22 pm
@mismi,
I liked it...
Joe Nation
 
  1  
Reply Sat 15 Jan, 2011 07:52 am
@JPB,
@JPB and JoefromChicago: Thanks for the hints as to where to go next with Ehrman. I don't know about the bathwater/baby comment; thus far (in Misquoting Jesus) he seems to take care not to get overblown or draw conclusions. We'll see.
I was given the book because of a conversation I was having with another person who was going on and on about the inerrancy of scripture. I mentioned that I had read James Carrol's Constantine's Sword awhile back and he (Carrol) seemed to indicate a lot less surety about the consistency of scripture than I had ever been taught.
So far, it's been revealing and fun; two words I use a lot when talking about historical writing but not in talking about scripture.
Joe(still too serious about the whole matter)Nation
0 Replies
 
djjd62
 
  1  
Reply Sat 15 Jan, 2011 08:04 am
@djjd62,
djjd62 wrote:

started reading Stephenson's Baroque Cycle

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Baroque_Cycle

listened to the first book from audible, found it really interesting but very plot heavy and hard to follow, so i bought the books, really liking reading them better


finished the first book, Quicksilver, and have started the second, King of the Vagabonds, really enjoying it so far, weird to go from a book with multiple characters taking place in to different timelines to a book with only (so far) two main characters taking place in a linear timeline
0 Replies
 
djjd62
 
  1  
Reply Sat 15 Jan, 2011 08:06 am
@tsarstepan,
sounds interesting, might be awhile before i get to it, got a back log of listening and the current set of books i'm reading run about 2700 pages when i'm done
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  2  
Reply Sat 15 Jan, 2011 11:28 am
In the last few days I've gotten hung up on reading The Guardian's Once Upon A Life series. To date, the series has 46 accounts by various writers (book or playwright) about a turning point in their younger lives. Some of the writers are known to me, and some I've not heard of (even though they've been Booker Prize nominees or otherwise famous to others), and I've had to keep another window open so I can look up the books mentioned. The accounts are engrossing to me (I've read about 15 so far), and, of course, well written.

Beware! This could be of interest:
http://www.guardian.co.uk/lifeandstyle/series/once-upon-a-life
0 Replies
 
kickycan
 
  1  
Reply Sun 23 Jan, 2011 02:59 pm
@chai2,
chai2 wrote:

kickycan wrote:

I am reading the craziest book ever right now. House of Leaves. Anyone heard of it? It's basically a haunted house story, but the way it's written, the way the story unfolds, the massive amount of footnotes and reference material, and the crazy typesetting peculiarities throughout take it way beyond being just another book.


Oh **** kicky, I've been encouraging people to read that book for YEARS!

I especially liked how I would get more caught up in the footnotes, than the actual story.

I re-read it maybe a year ago, and found new things that I didn't see or "get" the first time around. I'm sure if I read it again in a few years I'll find more stuff. The last time, I had found this weird symbol of some type, and, know nothing was in this book by chance, actually spent way more than an hour (maybe 2) backtracking, going forward, backtracking again, sliding sideways, tumbling perpendicular to a viewpoint, tracking down the origin. There is no way, because there was no reason, to have connected the two points by going forward, you had to do it by going backwards.

Since you're reading the book, I'm sure you're the only one who understands what I'm saying.

GO MINOTAURS!

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Gyug0q9eyqw[/youtube]






Yes, it's a cool book. I think I know what you mean. I know there is this symbol that looks kind of like a "K" but with the extenders not going all the way to the top and bottom, that I noticed throughout the book, which would take you back to the beginning of a chapter somewhere in the beginning. Is that the symbol you mean? What page is it on? I'd like to see if I can find what you're talking about. I read the whole book and then re-read a big chunk of it again right after I finished it, because I felt like I missed a lot. I did. I'm sure I missed a lot this time too.

What about the checkmark? There is a checkmark at the bottom of one page, and in the letters from Johnny Truant's mom in the loony bin she does tell him to put a checkmark at the bottom of one of his return letters to let her know that he got her letter, but the one in the book on whatever page it is (I can't remember now) obviously can't mean the same thing as the checkmark she asks Johnny to make.

Speaking of Johnny, his part of the story was at times kind of a distraction, although I liked the parts where he'd talk about how his life was spiralling downwards. It bugged me to be in the middle of something and then have to be derailed about five pages with a totally unrelated story about how he or his buddy got laid.

But mostly, I thought the book was pretty f---ing awesome.

So what do you think? Is there an actual monster (the minotaur?), and if so, is that what the growling is? Or is the growling sound just the sound of the house reconfiguring itself? Is the monster the darkness itself? I loved the part where Holloway was "erased" by the dark (Supposedly. It could have been just his flare going out, of course. Nothing is concrete in this house.).

Did you know that "leaves" is a publishing/printing term that signifies pages in a book. So the "house" in the story could actually be the book itself.



0 Replies
 
mismi
 
  2  
Reply Sun 23 Jan, 2011 03:05 pm
@ossobuco,
Not bad at all Osso. I was in the mood for it.

I have started reading the Percy Jackson series with my 7 year old. Just finished the Lightning Thief yesterday. We will start on Sea of Monsters tomorrow I think. I am having fun reading them!
tsarstepan
 
  1  
Reply Mon 24 Jan, 2011 09:27 am
@mismi,
Mismi, shared books can be extra great!

Right now, I'm listening to Faithful Place by Tana French. A murder mystery/crime procedural taking place in Ireland as a police detective is investigating the death of his former girlfriend who he was supposed to run away from home with to England at the age of 19 but never happened as she went a missing on the day they planned to run away.

Quote:
Frank Mackey grew up on a cramped Dublin cul-de-sac called Faithful Place. Street name notwithstanding, Frank had no fidelity to the neighborhood. A horrendous trick of fate drove him out of there two decades ago, and he turned his back on his difficult working-class family. But as Tana French’s expertly rendered, gripping new novel begins, Frank has to go home again.


http://www.nytimes.com/2010/07/12/books/12book.html
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Mapleleaf
 
  1  
Reply Tue 25 Jan, 2011 06:12 pm
These days, I am not reading books from cover to cover...at least, not in days or weeks. I turn on my computer and then pivot to the work table on my left. Nestled on top of the last year's workings lieTHE WIT AND WISDOM OF ABRAHAM LINCOLN and THE AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF BENJAMIN FRANKLIN, the emasculated version. I scan a page of two...wrestle with the words...make some sounds, then return to the lighted rectangle.
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Tue 25 Jan, 2011 07:58 pm
@Mapleleaf,
There's Mapleleaf! Good to see you. You have been missed.

I just finished quite a book, Tequila Blue by Rolo Diez; it's a police procedural set in Mexico City.
To quote a blurb on the back cover (by L'Humanite') - Diez describes a country torn by corruption, political duplicity, and ever-threatening bankruptcy, in a poetic but also raw language. Published in 1992.
0 Replies
 
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Tue 25 Jan, 2011 08:05 pm
just finished

http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51cxDRIt03L._BO2,204,203,200_PIsitb-sticker-arrow-click,TopRight,35,-76_AA300_SH20_OU01_.jpg

I was sad to get to the end.

now it's back to Gregory Maguire as transit reading. Son of a Witch is next on the stack.
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Tue 25 Jan, 2011 08:07 pm
@ehBeth,
That looks like a book I could like..
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Tue 25 Jan, 2011 08:23 pm
@ossobuco,
THE DOUBLE COMFORT SAFARI CLUB Alexander Mcall Smith's newest offering in his "Number One LAdie's Detective Agency". Its grown to a series based on two women in Botswana who run a detective agency in the bush and are called on to solve all sorts of domestic and criminal cases all the while living their lives as two "traditionally built women" of the country.
Im totally straight but these little books always are a neat diversion from reading the dry **** I have to plow into to help earn my daily bread.
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Tue 25 Jan, 2011 08:28 pm
@ossobuco,
I didn't think I'd like it - put off starting it - then kaboom, I was sucked in.

I'll have to watch for that Alexander McCall Smith. Both Set and I are fans. I was sort of lukewarm at first to the Detective Ladies, but they're captivating. Hearing a speech McCall Smith gave in Halifax added dimension to the books when I went at them a second time.
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Tue 25 Jan, 2011 08:28 pm
@farmerman,
I just read a squibble by A. McCall Smith in that Once Upon A Life Series (I've now finally read all of them to date) -


http://www.guardian.co.uk/lifeandstyle/2010/mar/07/alexander-mccall-smith-once-upon-life-belfast-troubles


0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Tue 25 Jan, 2011 08:31 pm
@ehBeth,
I once saved almost all art and museum (mmm, procedurals) that I read. Some were terrible, some wonderful, and by now I don't remember which was which of the many dozens. Ah, bless used book stores.
hamburgboy
 
  2  
Reply Tue 25 Jan, 2011 08:41 pm
@ossobuco,
i have several stacks of one dollar books sitting next to my bed .
so right now i'm reading " meeting at potsdam " by charles l. mee .
the games of intrigue played by truman , churchill and stalin - and their advisers - at the 1945 meeting at potsdam are truly fascinating .
well worth a dollar - and i don't mind " dog-earing " it .
hbg
0 Replies
 
cicerone imposter
 
  1  
Reply Tue 25 Jan, 2011 09:05 pm
I started reading Simon Winchester's "The Man Who Loved China" from the ship's library, but was unable to finish it in the week I had the book. I'm lucky, because my wife volunteers at the local library, and she will get the book for me when the person returns it.

It's about an eccentric biochemist, Joseph Needham, who teaches and does research at Cambridge. He falls in love with a Chinese woman even though he's already married, and eventually travels to China during the Japanese attacks in China and the Far East. He makes many discoveries including all the inventions created in China that other cultures claimed as theirs. Dr Needham looks into the first printed materials, and finds that China was the first. I have seen this document at the British Museum many decades ago; the fact that this story confirms what I have personally seen at the British Museum brings it full circle into this piece of history.

I've read through about 2/3ds of the book, and am looking forward to finishing it soon. Will report back with the ending.


0 Replies
 
Sglass
 
  1  
Reply Tue 25 Jan, 2011 10:59 pm
Sg is reading JamesPatterson and Richard Dilallo's "Alex Cross's Trial"
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