Roberta
 
Reply Mon 11 Aug, 2003 12:41 am
NEW YORK--The New York City school board has officially declared Jewish English--now dubbed Hebonics--as a second language. Backers of the move say the city's School District is the first in the state to recognize Hebonics as a valid language and significant attribute of New York culture.

According to Howard Schollman, linguistics professor at New York University and renowned Hebonics scholar, the sentence structure of Hebonics derives from middle and eastern European language patterns, as well as Yiddish.

Prof. Schollman explains, "In Hebonics, the response to any question is usually another question--plus a complaint that is implied or stated. Thus 'How are you?' may be answered, 'How should I be, with my feet?'"

Schollman says that Hebonics is a superb linguistic vehicle for expressing sarcasm or skepticism. An example is the repetition of a word with "sh" or "shm" at the beginning: "Mountains, shmountains. Stay away. You want a nosebleed?"

Another Hebonics pattern is moving the subject of a sentence to the end, with its pronoun at the beginning: "It's beautiful, that dress."

Schollman says one also sees the Hebonics verb moved to the end of the sentence. Thus the response to a remark such as "He's slow as a turtle," could be, "Turtle, shmurtle! Like a fly in Vaseline he walks."

Schollman provided the following examples from his textbook titled Switched-On Hebonics.

Question: "What time is it?"
English answer: "Sorry, I don't know."
Hebonics answer: "What am I, a clock?"

Remark: "I hope things turn out okay."
English response: "Thanks."
Hebonics response: "I should BE so lucky!"

Remark: "Hurry up. Dinner's ready."
English response: "Be right there."
Hebonics response: "All right already, I'm coming. What's with the 'hurry' business? Is there a fire?"

Remark: "I like the tie you gave me; wear it all the time."
English response: "Glad you like it."
Hebonics response: "So what's the matter; you don't like the other ties I gave you?"

Remark: "Sarah and I are engaged."
English response: "Congratulations."
Hebonics response: "She could stand to gain a few pounds."

Question: "Would you like to go riding with us?"
English answer: "Just say when."
Hebonics answer: "Riding, shmiding! What am I? A cowboy?"

To guest of honor at his birthday party:
English remark: "Happy birthday."
Hebonics remark: "A year smarter you should become."

Remark: "A beautiful day."
English response: "Sure is."
Hebonics response: "So the sun is out; what else is new?"

Answering a phone call from son:
English remark: "It's been a long time since you called."
Hebonic remark: "You didn't wonder if maybe I'm dead?"


Hi all. A friend sent this to me. I couldn't resist passing it along. BTW, like this my entire family talks. Smile

Roberta
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Type: Discussion • Score: 20 • Views: 48,727 • Replies: 886

 
Phoenix32890
 
  1  
Reply Mon 11 Aug, 2003 05:22 am
Roberta- So you think that you're the only one that talks that way??? Laughing
Walter Hinteler
 
  2  
Reply Mon 11 Aug, 2003 06:25 am
I've found this:

Standard English - Hebonics Phrase

"He walks slow" - "Like a fly in the ointment, he walks"
"You're sexy" - (unknown concept)
"Sorry, I do not know the time" - "What do I look like, a clock?"
"I hope things turn out for the best" - "You should BE so lucky"
"Anything can happen" - "It is never so bad, it can't get worse"
0 Replies
 
Roberta
 
  1  
Reply Mon 11 Aug, 2003 07:10 am
Thought of some alternative responses to "How are you?"

You shouldn't know from it.
Don't ask.
How should I be?

Phoenix, You think I talk like this. Hah! You should live so long.

Walter, Thanks Walter. You should live and be well.
0 Replies
 
Dartagnan
 
  1  
Reply Mon 11 Aug, 2003 04:26 pm
Ah, how refreshing! Brings me back to my childhood in NY and LI. Still, at the end of the day, a little of that goes a long way for me.
A headache, it gives me! Enough already!

True story: My little brother used to think "tumult" was a Yiddish word. As in "You kids quit making that tumult up there!" It actually does sound like it could be Yiddish, come to think of it...
0 Replies
 
Phoenix32890
 
  1  
Reply Mon 11 Aug, 2003 04:33 pm
D'Artagnan- Isn't it?

You think that tummel is English. So how about "tummler", the social director who shlepped the gawky young girls on the dance floor
Laughing
0 Replies
 
Dartagnan
 
  1  
Reply Mon 11 Aug, 2003 04:36 pm
I thought I'd better check, Phoenix. Tumult is
derived from the Latin tumultus. (I don't know about tummler, though I am familiar with the word...)

Heck, if I'd been wrong, I'd have to apologize to my brother.
0 Replies
 
Roberta
 
  1  
Reply Mon 11 Aug, 2003 04:40 pm
Maybe we're talking about two different words that somehow became one. Tummel and tumult. I used to think that tumult was Yiddish also. A new word we're making up? It could happen.
0 Replies
 
Phoenix32890
 
  1  
Reply Mon 11 Aug, 2003 04:43 pm
From out of my head you think I made it up????
0 Replies
 
sozobe
 
  1  
Reply Mon 11 Aug, 2003 04:46 pm
English response: This is great!
Hebonics response: What, this is news? We need some Professor fella to tell us how we talk? Hebonics, schmebonics.
0 Replies
 
Roberta
 
  1  
Reply Mon 11 Aug, 2003 04:59 pm
Phoenix, Shah, you shouldn't have a conniption. Can't a person wonder?

Soz, You're right. So what else is new.
0 Replies
 
Dartagnan
 
  1  
Reply Mon 11 Aug, 2003 05:00 pm
Again, going to the dictionary (American Heritage College): Tummler is from the Yiddish, tumlen (to make a racket).

So, it certainly would seem that the words are related. Tumult did exist in Middle English, which certainly contained many Germanic words. And Yiddish, of course, is based on German.

Go figure!
0 Replies
 
Roberta
 
  1  
Reply Mon 11 Aug, 2003 05:02 pm
D'art, Who knew?
0 Replies
 
Phoenix32890
 
  1  
Reply Mon 11 Aug, 2003 05:05 pm
Roberta- Wonder, shmunder..... You think I should break my head over some big deal teacher who thinks that he knows better than me? Nah!
0 Replies
 
Dartagnan
 
  1  
Reply Mon 11 Aug, 2003 05:07 pm
For this he went to college?
0 Replies
 
Phoenix32890
 
  1  
Reply Mon 11 Aug, 2003 05:09 pm
A decent living he is going to make from this dreck??? Laughing
0 Replies
 
Roberta
 
  1  
Reply Mon 11 Aug, 2003 05:13 pm
D'art and Phoenix, I'm laughing so hard I shouldn't get a rupture.
0 Replies
 
Phoenix32890
 
  1  
Reply Mon 11 Aug, 2003 05:16 pm
Did you hear the one about the truss maker whose slogan was,

"Your rupture is my rapture"!
0 Replies
 
Dartagnan
 
  1  
Reply Mon 11 Aug, 2003 05:20 pm
I actually learned my first Yiddish sentence, picking apart my parents' commentary over my little sister's fussy eating patterns (pardon my approximate spelling):

Der kleiner esse nicht.
0 Replies
 
Roberta
 
  1  
Reply Tue 12 Aug, 2003 01:32 am
Uh oh. Big trouble for your little sister. What could be worse than not eating?
0 Replies
 
 

 
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