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Welcome home Prime Minister now **** off.

 
 
Reply Mon 10 Sep, 2007 01:28 pm
Is Pakistan really the most crackpot country on earth?

http://www.guardian.co.uk/pakistan/Story/0,,2166001,00.html
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Type: Discussion • Score: 0 • Views: 661 • Replies: 9
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smorgs
 
  1  
Reply Tue 11 Sep, 2007 12:32 am
Quite...

Tried to make conversation with one of my Pakistani customers yesterday, by mentioning the debacle (so he knew I was current affair aware).

Well, he launched into a massive tirade against the corruption in Pakistan, so much so, the security officer came to stand beside my desk, thinking he was abusing me about the benefits system.

Feelings run high.

Never mind, the Saudi's will look after him.

x
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Steve 41oo
 
  1  
Reply Fri 14 Sep, 2007 04:28 am
thanks for the reply. I like replies. Most of my topics dont get any Sad :wink:

Pakistan seems to be a cauldron of corruption religious extremism and militarism...with nuclear weapons. If Osama bin Laden gets his hands on nuclear weapons it will be courtesy of Pakistan.
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Endymion
 
  1  
Reply Sun 16 Sep, 2007 06:46 am
As a fellow Londoner, I feel compelled to apologise to any Pakistani visitors (and a2k regulars) for Steve 41oo's obvious prejudice

Sorry about that (and not all Brits see it this way)

There's only one thing that drives prejudice and that is fear
If you are afraid of the nuclear bomb - you know what to do

HELP BAN IT FROM THE PLANET

(You could start by joining CND)
0 Replies
 
Ramafuchs
 
  1  
Reply Sun 16 Sep, 2007 09:18 am
Pak's crisis
"But present events suggest that a prolonged period of political turbulence is getting under way. The rivals for power, the incumbent president, Pervez Musharraf, and Benazir Bhutto and Nawaz Sharif, the previous prime ministers and leaders of the two main political parties, who when in power ruled as quasi dictators themselves, seem intent on a bruising battle that is bound to slow an economy that is now, more than any other single thing, making Pakistanis feel they have a better future.

The only way to head off a showdown that will rock the country to its foundations is to allow free elections. However, Musharraf's dilemna is that he knows he cannot win an election unless he can form an alliance with either Bhutto or Sharif. And if he forms an alliance with one the other will cry "foul" and will attempt to mobilize confrontational street protests. Given the feudal line up behind Bhutto and Sharif this will split the country on geographical lines, which is hardly the way to improve political stability or to attract foreign investors. It will also boost the fortunes of the religious militants.

All three of them have a responsibility to the wider good. However events play out they all have a duty to keep the temperature down and to avoid taking the country to the brink.Resolving Pakistan's grave political crisis
http://www.transnational.org/Columns_Power/2007/34.Pakistan.html
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lostnsearching
 
  1  
Reply Sun 16 Sep, 2007 09:32 am
Re: Pak's crisis
Ramafuchs wrote:
"But present events suggest that a prolonged period of political turbulence is getting under way. The rivals for power, the incumbent president, Pervez Musharraf, and Benazir Bhutto and Nawaz Sharif, the previous prime ministers and leaders of the two main political parties, who when in power ruled as quasi dictators themselves, seem intent on a bruising battle that is bound to slow an economy that is now, more than any other single thing, making Pakistanis feel they have a better future.

The only way to head off a showdown that will rock the country to its foundations is to allow free elections. However, Musharraf's dilemna is that he knows he cannot win an election unless he can form an alliance with either Bhutto or Sharif. And if he forms an alliance with one the other will cry "foul" and will attempt to mobilize confrontational street protests. Given the feudal line up behind Bhutto and Sharif this will split the country on geographical lines, which is hardly the way to improve political stability or to attract foreign investors. It will also boost the fortunes of the religious militants.

All three of them have a responsibility to the wider good. However events play out they all have a duty to keep the temperature down and to avoid taking the country to the brink.Resolving Pakistan's grave political crisis
http://www.transnational.org/Columns_Power/2007/34.Pakistan.html


Solution: (for the people who are lost in the paradox) support the country goddamnit, not Musharaf, Bhutto, or sharif

****************************

Steve 41oo wrote:
Pakistan seems to be a cauldron of corruption religious extremism and militarism


If you choose to see only that side of it....


Steve 41oo wrote:
If Osama bin Laden gets his hands on nuclear weapons it will be courtesy of Pakistan.


We have so many, that we don't mind giving some to this fake character....

*************************************

ps. thanks Endy

"There's only one thing that drives prejudice and that is fear"
0 Replies
 
Ramafuchs
 
  1  
Reply Sun 16 Sep, 2007 09:43 am
0 Replies
 
Ramafuchs
 
  1  
Reply Sun 16 Sep, 2007 10:38 am
Troublesome threesome
„The stakes are high. After eight years of military dictatorship, Pakistan is spoiling for another round of democratic experiments. The battle is on for a new protagonist and a new cast of characters. Who will rule Pakistan and in what manner? Basically, the questions everybody wants answered are: Is Musharraf going? If he goes, who comes in? Meanwhile, what happens to Pakistan's flock of Islamist terrorists and nuclear weapons?
Musharraf cannot rule the country without ruling over its most powerful institution, the army. "Without his uniform, Musharraf is dead meat," say western diplomats with experience of Pakistan.
. The army is a one-boss outfit and there is no room for a civilian centre of power.

Musharraf, however, needs to have a bigger gameplan than merely staying in power. The next dates to watch out for on the Pakistani calendar are October 15 when the presidential vote by lawmakers has to be held, and November 15 when Musharraf's current five-year presidential term as well as assembly term expire. A lot of political bloodletting is expected by then. „

http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/Troublesome_threesome/articleshow/2373050.cms
0 Replies
 
Steve 41oo
 
  1  
Reply Sun 16 Sep, 2007 12:36 pm
Endymion wrote:
As a fellow Londoner, I feel compelled to apologise to any Pakistani visitors (and a2k regulars) for Steve 41oo's obvious prejudice

Sorry about that (and not all Brits see it this way)

There's only one thing that drives prejudice and that is fear
If you are afraid of the nuclear bomb - you know what to do

HELP BAN IT FROM THE PLANET

(You could start by joining CND)
well thank you for apologising endy. Do you think Pakistan will unilaterally renounce nuclear weapons? (Having struggled so hard courtesy of A Q Khan's thieving from Urensco to get the bomb in the first place). I'll join CND immediately after Osama bin Laden, deal? And just what planet are you on btw?
0 Replies
 
Steve 41oo
 
  1  
Reply Fri 23 Nov, 2007 12:43 pm
Endymion wrote:
As a fellow Londoner, I feel compelled to apologise to any Pakistani visitors (and a2k regulars) for Steve 41oo's obvious prejudice

Sorry about that (and not all Brits see it this way)

There's only one thing that drives prejudice and that is fear
If you are afraid of the nuclear bomb - you know what to do

HELP BAN IT FROM THE PLANET

(You could start by joining CND)
You apologise for me and I'll apologise for you being a complete prat. Mate.

Meanwhile in that crackpot country Pakistan....
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