8
   

Junie B. Jones, Magic Treehouse, and...?

 
 
sozobe
 
  1  
Reply Tue 21 Oct, 2008 07:49 am
@DrMom,
Yes, "Calvin and Hobbes" was very popular with my kid too. She has a very good friend who is a stuffed bear, so she identified.

Has your son read "Tintin"? She loved that too.

"Matilda" is a book by Roald Dahl ("Charlie and the Chocolate Factory," "James and the Giant Peach") It's about a very smart and very nice girl who figures out she has some special powers... more here:

http://www.amazon.com/Matilda-Roald-Dahl/dp/0141301066
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sozobe
 
  1  
Reply Tue 21 Oct, 2008 07:52 am
@Thomas,
Indeed.

I forgot -- a few nights ago, sozlet said, "Can you tell the A2K people that I also really liked that part about [here she gave the quote but she lent the book to her teacher and I forget it -- it was about how you know something's wrong when dolphins who normally can use echolocation to find a quarter on the bottom of the river can't tell when they're about to be brained by a boat...]"
Thomas
 
  1  
Reply Tue 21 Oct, 2008 01:31 pm
@sozobe,
Cool -- she's going to infect her teacher with her enthusiasm now. I bet he/she is now an Obama voter, too. Smile
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DrMom
 
  1  
Reply Fri 24 Oct, 2008 11:52 pm
@sozobe,
My Son has a recommendation.
"Hi I just looked at the list with my mom.I really liked a series of books called
the Bailey School Kids. There are four third graders and they go on silly mysteries that might not be real."
He found it amusing that You have not read Harry Potter yet. He devoured them last school year. On an average one book per school week and then a report. I had the luxury of reading the book reports and editing them. So I got my taste of them.
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DrMom
 
  1  
Reply Fri 14 Nov, 2008 06:37 pm
@sozobe,
Heidi by Johanna Spyri
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Thomas
 
  1  
Reply Mon 5 Jan, 2009 06:48 pm
I'm sure Oliver Sacks didn't write his Anthropologist on Mars for children. But when I re-read it between the years, it struck me that nothing in the book would prevent an intelligent child from enjoying it. The language isn't hard, and the subjects of the essays might well be a magnet for a child with a taste for interesting weirdness. And I do like Sacks's medical relativism -- don't think of autists and the deaf as people whom there's something wrong with; think of them as cultures in their own right. Although this perspective isn't an intellectual panacea, I find it well worth introducing to other people's children.
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wertyiu102
 
  1  
Reply Sun 12 Apr, 2009 12:21 pm
@sozobe,
Horrible HArry, by Suzie Kline
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FreeDuck
 
  1  
Reply Wed 19 Aug, 2009 06:31 am
What's sozlet reading these days? If I remember correctly she's heading for the third grade but probably reading a bit further, and seems to enjoy a lot of the same things that Duckie likes. The little ducks have recently taken a liking to Jules Verne, though on audiobook, not reading themselves. I was kind of surprised that they liked it because the language is not what they're used to, but they adored Journey to the Center of the Earth (great for long car rides) and are now listening to 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea. I thought I'd drop it here as a suggestion.

Also, Duckie has been making his way through all the Harry Potter books he can find in the library. I know he's late to the trend, but it seems to have been timed right for him.
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djjd62
 
  1  
Reply Sun 28 Nov, 2010 08:14 am
reading this now and really liking it (i'm just a big kid at heart i guess)
http://www.wired.com/geekdad/wp-content/uploads/2010/08/Wondla-200x307.jpg
http://www.wired.com/geekdad/2010/10/the-search-for-wondla/
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Thomas
 
  1  
Reply Tue 20 Mar, 2012 11:20 pm
Has the Evil Genius introduced Sozlet to Richard Feynman yet? I just watched an old Nova feature about him on YouTube. It captures his spirit perfectly. And more importantly, she needn't understand theoretical physics to understand it. It's about Feynman's "last journey" to see the faraway land of Tana-Tuva. Never heard of Tana-Tuva? That's the point! That's what made the idea of seeing it so desirably to Feynman.

I have a fairly strong intuition Sozlet might like this movie---and Richard Feynman himself.

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cliffwill88
 
  1  
Reply Thu 26 Apr, 2012 09:40 pm
@sozobe,
well,, uhmm,, my neice loves Little red riding hood (she's 6) the adapted version from Bertram & Boo, she can hardly go to bed without finishing the story though she read it for a couple of times within this week. it had beautiful illustration that lizzie loved, try it.
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Ceili
 
  1  
Reply Thu 26 Apr, 2012 10:35 pm
Since I don't have kids that age any more, and I'm not really up on the latest books for kids, I went to my favourite source. Laurie Greenwood owns a local bookstores and does online radio podcasts (sorry soz) book reviews. I trust her judgement. I apologize, because a) I'm not sure how old Sozlet is and if there is some over lapping from everyone else. A good book is a good book. Anyhow, here's her list, the little blurbs are pretty interesting.

Quote:

Picture Books (ages 3 years to 8, but adults are also allowed to read & enjoy!)
Ferdinand the Bull by Munro Leaf was one of the first books I recall loving as a child. Ferdinand is a peaceful bull who doesn’t want to fight; he’d rather stop and smell the flowers.

Miss Rumphius by Barbara Cooney is one of my all-time favorites and I always stocked it in both paperback and hardcover. I often give it to adult friends as a gift. It tells the story of a world traveler, Miss Alice Rumphius who shares her adventures at story-time with her niece and teaches her to leave something beautiful in the world.

Bad Kitty by Nick Bruel is probably the funniest alphabet book ever written and the illustrations are fun for both adults and children. From nonsensical foods, kitty’s bad behavior, foods kitty likes and then atonement, this lively book manages to work through the alphabet several times for new learners.

Scaredy Squirrel by Montreal author Melanie Watt is the funniest and sweetest picture book to come along in a while. I just fell in love with this obsessive-compulsive squirrel who is afraid to leave his tree, until he learns he’s a flying squirrel. There are now a number of books in the series as Scaredy discovers the world (albeit tentatively).

Chester -- also by Melanie Watt -- is a book that makes books come alive. As Melanie tries to write her story Chester the cat keeps interrupting and writing his story in red felt pen, with many hilarious results between the dueling authors.

The Boy from the Sun by Canadian author Duncan Weller is almost dream-like, beginning with the sparsest drawings and elevating into something truly wondrous. Three young children sitting near a large factory are surprised by a boy with a yellow head who descends to earth and teaches them to run, play and enjoy the beauty of the world all around them. This book was winner of the Governor General’s Award for Illustration in 2007.


Middle Readers (ages 8 to 12)

For beginning readers who want to make that big step up and start reading their own chapter books, a very successful series (and at this age children love to follow a series and keep track of the number they read) is the Magic Tree House by Mary Pope Osborne. Every time a young boy and girl enter their magic tree house they are transported to another time or place or even visit exotic animals. I like this series for its short chapters, they still have illustrations, and they are easily geared to children’s interest.

Charlotte’s Web by E.B. White was a book I read 247 times (approximately!) and never tired of. I know I have cried my head off every time I read about the spider Charlotte and her friend Wilbur the pig but it has never stopped me from reading it again.

I like the Ramona series by Beverly Cleary that follows Ramona from preschool through several years, as she goes to school, learns to ride a bike, has a brother, all the things young children may find themselves facing. Cleary makes these everyday events in the hands of Ramona the Brave (or Ramona the Pest) a lot of fun.

What child won’t love Charlie & the Chocolate Factory by Roald Dahl? In fact, most children get hooked on all of Dahl’s books for his great sense of humor and adventure. As an adult, I love and often give as gifts his books The Twits and Revolting Rhymes.

A Series of Unfortunate Events by Lemony Snicket have proven to be bestsellers every time one was published. Following the adventures of the Baudelaire orphans trying to escape their evil Uncle Olaf, the thirteen books in this series promise the reader that nothing good ever happens, this is about unfortunate events.

The Daring Book for Boys and The Dangerous Book for Girls are two of my favorite non-fiction books for this age group in along while. Lamenting the loss of old-fashioned fun and basic knowledge, this book offers great stories of exploration and courage, history facts and genealogical tables, how to build a tree house or a go-kart. There are no household chores in the girl’s version (I checked immediately) but does include stories of great women in sports and history. Designed like an old-fashioned almanac, this book should prove to be a keepsake on many a bookshelf.



Here is the full list and suggestions for older readers 13+.
http://www.lauriesbookcompany.ca/kids_lit.html-
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