8
   

Junie B. Jones, Magic Treehouse, and...?

 
 
sozobe
 
  2  
Reply Tue 23 Sep, 2008 04:55 pm
@dlowan,
Yes of course! Elephant's child et al...

Which reminds me, when we were desperate for books I went to my basement stash of moldy old paperbacks I saved from when I was a kid and thought about "A Wrinkle in Time" -- it's kind of scary though, especially with the physicist dad and all. (Parallels.) What do you guys think?
sozobe
 
  2  
Reply Tue 23 Sep, 2008 04:56 pm
@jespah,
I have the Edith Hamilton paperback -- maybe it's AN Edith Hamilton paperback though? Worth checking whether she has a kid's version. (The one I have is kinda dry and scholarly, though I love it.)
jespah
 
  1  
Reply Tue 23 Sep, 2008 04:58 pm
Oh yeah Black Beauty. But she's probably young for it -- it has some nasty aspects to it, talks about horses going to the knacker's and the like.
0 Replies
 
sozobe
 
  1  
Reply Tue 23 Sep, 2008 04:59 pm
@dlowan,
Promising! I've heard of those but haven't read them yet.
0 Replies
 
jespah
 
  1  
Reply Tue 23 Sep, 2008 05:08 pm
@sozobe,
The Myths book I recall was a huge hardcover, beautifully illustrated.
dlowan
 
  1  
Reply Tue 23 Sep, 2008 05:21 pm
@sozobe,
I think A Wrinkle would be worth trying.

There's a heap of sequels, you know...I bought them a while back...they're out in new dresses and all. I don't think they have the magic of Wrinkle...but they're nice.


I don't think a modern kid would be too fazed by Wrinkle.
0 Replies
 
Thomas
 
  1  
Reply Tue 23 Sep, 2008 07:25 pm
@sozobe,
sozobe wrote:
Definitely. Probably not quite there yet...

Not quite there? I was going to suggest you give her the Greek originals. Figuring out the new alphabet and the new language would seem like a nice, appropriate challenge for her.
0 Replies
 
dlowan
 
  1  
Reply Wed 24 Sep, 2008 02:37 am
@sozobe,
Quote:
Yes of course! Elephant's child et al...


No, no...that's his "Just So" stories...which are wonderful.

And here they are online!

http://www.boop.org/jan/justso/


And, my favourite of course:


The Cat That Walked by Himself.


"THE CAT THAT WALKED BY HIMSELF

HEAR and attend and listen; for this befell and behappened and became and was, O my Best Beloved, when the Tame animals were wild. The Dog was wild, and the Horse was wild, and the Cow was wild, and the Sheep was wild, and the Pig was wild--as wild as wild could be--and they walked in the Wet Wild Woods by their wild lones. But the wildest of all the wild animals was the Cat. He walked by himself, and all places were alike to him.

Of course the Man was wild too. He was dreadfully wild. He didn't even begin to be tame till he met the Woman, and she told him that she did not like living in his wild ways. She picked out a nice dry Cave, instead of a heap of wet leaves, to lie down in; and she strewed clean sand on the floor; and she lit a nice fire of wood at the back of the Cave; and she hung a dried wild-horse skin, tail-down, across the opening of the Cave; and she said, 'Wipe you feet, dear, when you come in, and now we'll keep house.'

That night, Best Beloved, they ate wild sheep roasted on the hot stones, and flavoured with wild garlic and wild pepper; and wild duck stuffed with wild rice and wild fenugreek and wild coriander; and marrow-bones of wild oxen; and wild cherries, and wild grenadillas. Then the Man went to sleep in front of the fire ever so happy; but the Woman sat up, combing her hair. She took the bone of the shoulder of mutton--the big fat blade-bone--and she looked at the wonderful marks on it, and she threw more wood on the fire, and she made a Magic. She made the First Singing Magic in the world.

Out in the Wet Wild Woods all the wild animals gathered together where they could see the light of the fire a long way off, and they wondered what it meant........"

Continues here:


http://www.boop.org/jan/justso/cat.htm

With illustrations!!!!


Here's where you can have a look at The Jungle Books:

http://www.cs.cmu.edu/~rgs/jngl-table.html

You see, the copyright has expired.


Also...folkloric Kipling...Puck of Pook's Hill.


http://www.cs.cmu.edu/~rgs/puck-table.html



For a terrible old imperialist (he wrote the terrible "The White Man's Burden" http://www.fordham.edu/halsall/mod/Kipling.html (apparently to try to get the US to develop the Phillipines!) he could do magic.....and his attitudes surely lead to some damn fine discussions.


If you are to "do" TH White...you MUST look at Mistress Masham's Repose...especially if she liked Gulliver's Travels:

http://able2know.org/topic/2848-1


There's something about it buried here, too:

http://able2know.org/topic/4541-1


BUT....no child's life can be complete without The Borrowers by Mary Norton.

This book (and its sequels) tell the story of a race of tiny people who live in the homes of Humans and live on what is available to be gathered.

It is a lovely and magical book....



Also, Alison Uttley's "A Traveller in Time".

A ravishing book about a girl who finds herself able to move between post-WW II and Elizabethan England.









0 Replies
 
jespah
 
  2  
Reply Wed 24 Sep, 2008 04:14 am
@jespah,
Not the edition I remember, but here it is: Wonder Book.
cyphercat
 
  1  
Reply Mon 29 Sep, 2008 06:11 pm
@jespah,
Oh yeah, that's the name of the first one, I couldn't remember it. Tanglewood Tales is the sequel, kinda (not that they need to be read in order or anything).
0 Replies
 
DrMom
 
  0  
Reply Thu 16 Oct, 2008 06:52 pm
Bookmarking
sozobe
 
  1  
Reply Fri 17 Oct, 2008 12:43 pm
@DrMom,
Hi DrMom,

Sozlet just read "Matilda" -- loved it. Loved loved loved. It mentions "Just So Stories" and she wants to read that next (I saw boomer mention it someplace recently too -- I think her "books to read aloud" thread), but the paperback we have is ancient and smelly and has tiny print. Might get a new one.
Thomas
 
  1  
Reply Fri 17 Oct, 2008 01:23 pm
I sense a risk of recommending too many books of the wild-animals-in-your-house variant. But I heard an interview about this one on NPR, loved what I heard, bought the book, and the first 50 pages are charming and interesting as advertised.

Wesley the Owl -- A remarkable story of an owl and his girl

(I'm sure EG is unallergic to owls, and wouldn't object to his daughter having one for a pet.)
sozobe
 
  1  
Reply Fri 17 Oct, 2008 03:25 pm
@Thomas,
Oh hey, you remind me that she is currently reading her first your-avatar book!

Oh my goodness...! She's on my lap and I tapped your avatar and said "That's Douglas Adams!" and her eyes got HUMUNGOUS and she said "what...?" in a very small disbelieving voice and I said "oh no no no just the avatar! It's not actually Douglas Adams" and she finally started breathing again...

Anyway she's reading "Last Chance to See" and loving it. I asked her what she liked best about it and she said that it's so funny... quoted a line about how an Aye-aye stares into a whole 'nother world that exists somewhere beyond your left shoulder...
sozobe
 
  1  
Reply Fri 17 Oct, 2008 03:26 pm
@Thomas,
And forgot to say the owl book looks great! Thanks for the recommendation.
0 Replies
 
Thomas
 
  1  
Reply Fri 17 Oct, 2008 09:38 pm
@sozobe,
I wonder what she'll think about the scene where they go to Chinese pharmacies to buy condoms because their underwater microphones need protection in the Yangtse. The Chinese pharmacists try to convince them to buy pills instead, and neither side speaks the other's language well enough to get their point across. Classic.
sozobe
 
  1  
Reply Sat 18 Oct, 2008 12:16 pm
@Thomas,
She says she thought it was funny. (I'm pre-screening chapters, didn't let her read one ["Leopardskin Pillbox Hat" or something] but missed that.) Seems harmless anyway.

She says about that section, "and how whenever he'd do anything in China, like just eating or whatever, people would start crowding around him like he was the president..."
Thomas
 
  1  
Reply Sun 19 Oct, 2008 12:28 pm
@sozobe,
That probably wasn't an exaggeration. When I was on that conference in Wuhan five years ago, I ditched the official guide one evening and took off on myself. I soon found out that Europeans are still a major attraction in China. (This part of China, anyway.) About 10 teenage- to- student-aged people followed me around at any time during that stroll, and they all tried to start a conversation with me with the little English they could speak. (They were all very friendly. I never felt stalked, or solicited, or anything else I would find disagreeable. But it was a very strange feeling to suddenly find myself in the role of a celebrity.)

Considering that Adams went to China 20 years before I did, and that China wasn't as open at that time as it is now, I can easily see crowds of hundreds following him around.
DrMom
 
  1  
Reply Tue 21 Oct, 2008 12:24 am
@sozobe,
My son is into comics these days. Calvin and Hobbes are present with us at each mealtime. Not the strongest kind of reading, he probably has found a substitute for cartoons as screen time is restricted.
I am observing quietly for a while knowing that I have many recommendations(thnks a2k) if ever asked.
We read " Search for Delicious" together that we truly enjoyed.
DrMom
 
  1  
Reply Tue 21 Oct, 2008 12:25 am
@sozobe,
Could you describe "Matilda" a litlle more simply?
0 Replies
 
 

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