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Love Makes The Bitter Sweet

 
 
Miller
 
Reply Sat 24 Mar, 2007 08:23 am
Love Makes The Bitter Sweet

Love makes bitter sweet;
Copper gold;
Shadows vanish;
Death into life;
Leaders into slaves.
From understanding comes love.
Has folishness ever brought you so high?

Rumi
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Type: Discussion • Score: 1 • Views: 2,339 • Replies: 26
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carrie
 
  1  
Reply Sat 24 Mar, 2007 10:36 am
Lovely poem. The world is all about love; love is everywhere. The love inside us can touch anything and everything, and transform the seemingly mundane.
xx
0 Replies
 
Miller
 
  1  
Reply Sat 24 Mar, 2007 03:16 pm
carrie wrote:
Lovely poem. The world is all about love; love is everywhere. The love inside us can touch anything and everything, and transform the seemingly mundane.
xx


The love you express is the Divine shining through.
0 Replies
 
DrMom
 
  1  
Reply Sun 2 Sep, 2007 10:50 pm
This is lovely Could you tell us more about Rumi ?
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Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Sun 2 Sep, 2007 10:58 pm
DrMom wrote:
This is lovely Could you tell us more about Rumi ?


It's a 13th century Persian Muslim poet, jurist, and theologian. (See wikipedia entry)
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Miller
 
  1  
Reply Mon 3 Sep, 2007 09:22 am
http://www.rumi.org.uk/

Rumi also published a small book of poems, the title of which I'll post later this month.
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DrMom
 
  1  
Reply Mon 3 Sep, 2007 08:39 pm
Thanks Miller and Walter.
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DrMom
 
  1  
Reply Wed 5 Sep, 2007 09:36 pm
So is this Rumis Translated poetry because you guys say he was apersian poet?
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DrMom
 
  1  
Reply Wed 5 Sep, 2007 09:52 pm
Yes Indeed these are translations. Sorry for the ignorant questions.
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Miller
 
  1  
Reply Thu 6 Sep, 2007 02:13 am
Yes, these are translations from Arabic.
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DrMom
 
  1  
Reply Thu 6 Sep, 2007 11:05 pm
Do you think translated poetry can still maintain it's charm?
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Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Fri 7 Sep, 2007 02:20 am
Besides in Persian (mostly), Rumi wrote in Arabic, Greek, and Oghuz Turkish.

All this had to be translated, even in the modern versions of those languages.


Yes, poetry maintains its charm in translations.
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McTag
 
  1  
Reply Fri 7 Sep, 2007 02:31 am
My teacher (Frau Dehmel) said that Shakespeare had been translated into German so well, that there were Germans who always assumed he was English.
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Miller
 
  1  
Reply Fri 7 Sep, 2007 04:37 pm
DrMom wrote:
Do you think translated poetry can still maintain it's charm?


As far a German poetry is concerned, I'd say no. As far as Persian poetry I'd say yes.
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McTag
 
  1  
Reply Sat 8 Sep, 2007 12:56 am
I'd be interested to hear Walter's opinion about that. There are no good translations of Heine or Goethe? Schiller?
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Miller
 
  1  
Reply Sat 8 Sep, 2007 01:09 am
McTag wrote:
I'd be interested to hear Walter's opinion about that. There are no good translations of Heine or Goethe? Schiller?


They don't sound the same in English, at least to me.
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DrMom
 
  1  
Reply Sat 8 Sep, 2007 03:55 am
Quote:
The love you express is the Divine shining through


I think the love Rumi expresses is also the Divine . I think in Muslim poetry two kinds of love/lovers are described. Mehboob-e-haqiqi is Diveine Love or God. Mehboob-e-majazi is any creation that is loved.
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satt fs
 
  1  
Reply Sat 8 Sep, 2007 03:59 am
DrMom wrote:
Do you think translated poetry can still maintain it's charm?

In my opinion, it might be better to think that a rendering of a poem in another language was not a translation of the poem but that it was a commentary to the original poem. And it is sometimes very useful for understanding the poem written in a rather unfamiliar language.
0 Replies
 
DrMom
 
  1  
Reply Sat 8 Sep, 2007 10:01 am
Quote:
In my opinion, it might be better to think that a rendering of a poem in another language was not a translation of the poem but that it was a commentary to the original poem


I tend to think that a commentary on poetry could sometimes ruin poetry. You are supposed feels it just the way poet felt it. Experience the same flow of emotions in your brain. That's when you feel the love that is expressed by Rumi. Od course we are loving it so that means it maintains some of it's charm but I would be hesitant to say all of it.
0 Replies
 
CalamityJane
 
  1  
Reply Sat 8 Sep, 2007 10:31 am
It is nice to have poetry translated into different languages,
at least we can get the gist of it and don't have to miss out on some
beautiful poems. However, I think that even the best translation
won't interpret the true feeling the poet has meant to convey to the
reader.

Satt is right when he said that translating a poem is a commentary,
yet I would call it interpretation, as every translator is reading something
different into a phrase and the outcome could be quite subjective to
the translators own feelings and experience.

When I read Heine or Hesse in English, I can relate to its content better
but I think mainly because I have the German version still in my mind,
and know how it is meant to be.

Poetry means different things at different times, and I remember that
I liked Rumi a lot better when I was at an age where I still searched
for answers. Now I can appreciate his (Rumi) poems, but they have
a different meaning today.

Does this all make sense?
0 Replies
 
 

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