littlek
 
  1  
Reply Tue 10 Jun, 2003 06:06 pm
Bootsie barks like a pitbull with rabbies at the UPS truck - doesn't matter who's driving it and it doesn't happen with the USPS or FedEx trucks.

She also will sometimes not wolf down her food but poke at the contents of the bowl and at the bowl itself. She'll rarely bring the entire bowl into the living room without spilling any kibble. Thing is I've NEVER seen her do it.
0 Replies
 
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Tue 10 Jun, 2003 06:09 pm
The only thing Bailey 'buries' is Setanta's dirty socks. mmmmmmmmm. Cleaning up in the living room one day. Picked up Bailey's special 'graduation' pillow. 13 basic black men's socks were stashed underneath, evidently not from the clean laundry. I put one back under the pillow, and washed the other dozen.

Bailey also likes to sleep with one of Setanta's t-shirts. He knows who is missing from his pack. Sad
0 Replies
 
Piffka
 
  1  
Reply Tue 10 Jun, 2003 06:31 pm
PD -- heelers have more brainpower. Chows are so gullible, they really believe we'll do something mean. We don't! Trust me, we don't! When their "daddy" yells at them, they usually try to hide behind me. It is so sad but so silly, I have to laugh.

I think it's not that Bootsie doesn't like Brown; I think that the UPS truckperson has been mean to Bootsie sometime in the past. Dogs are smart about that and unforgiving. She's being smart. I don't know about the dogfood getting carried around. Maybe she wants TV dinner? We had a cat who always took the food out of his bowl, then ate it. It's messy.

Beth, you may have discovered where all single socks go that get lost in the laundry. Thirteen of 'em! I'm impressed. Errr, what's a graduation pillow?
0 Replies
 
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Tue 10 Jun, 2003 06:36 pm
aahhhhhhhh, the graduation pillow. The day that Bailey completed, and passed!, his AKC Canine Good Citizenship exam, I took him into the bedding section of our Petsmart and threw a sample of each pillow on the floor. I bought him the one he decided to lie down on.

It's a lovely hot pink velour flower with a bright yellow centre. It came with an attached lady bug squeekie plush toy (that Cleo has adopted). It goes sooooooooooo well with my sorta neutral-coloured cottage-style decor. It doesn't matter. It's Bailey's graduation pillow.
0 Replies
 
Piffka
 
  1  
Reply Tue 10 Jun, 2003 06:58 pm
Uhmmm, he has excellent taste. Smile And who says we spoil our pets?

When you get a photo of him lying on his flower, I hope you'll show us.
0 Replies
 
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Tue 10 Jun, 2003 07:27 pm
When Setanta gets back, he'll (i hope) help me download some pix I took on the weekend. One is of Bailey on top of his graduation pillow, in one of the new white wicker porch chairs. You may not recognize him. hamburger and mrs. hamburger took the kids to the groomer about a month ago. We're all still in recovery Shocked . Cleo looks like a pitbull puppy, Bailey like a small basenji Shocked Shocked
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Tue 10 Jun, 2003 07:49 pm
I once had the marginal supervision of a Basenji, named Twerp. The man i worked for (i lived on the property) had found Twerp wandering around on the state highway coming north from Santa Fe. She had Albequerque tags, but when he called the owners, they didn't want her back--they were indignant at being bothered. Twerp was not a clingy or pushy or nasty dog--she was . . . just a little twerp. She nursed all of the other dogs. In the southwest, the rattlers are little affairs, two to three feet long, not to be compared to the five or six foot long timber rattlers i've seen in the East--the dogs were always getting bit (there were ten dogs on the farm, we had a snake bite case about every other week). Twerp would herd them over by the big water basin under the constantly dripping tap, and the lie down next to them and lick and occassionally even suck at the wound (after "sucking" the wound, she would walk about ten feet away, regurgitate, and then go drink about a pint of water). Twice daily she would go get about three or four mouthfuls of kibble, and drop it under their noses, then nudge and annoy them until they ate it. She would stay at their side for three or four days, never wandering off except for nursing activities or to relieve herself. No other dog would interfer with her at those times, and they would cautiously step away from the kibble troth when she approached (i always wondered about the first time she went for food, and ran off seven dogs who were each one five times her size). When the dog was recovered, all eight of them (border collie/australian shepherd crosses) would return to their habit of ignoring her, and treating her like the twerp she was.

Like all good communities, the dogs had their fun with twerp. At "the other house," where i lived, there was an old, shaggy yellow hippie dog who had been left behind as a puppuy when one of the local hippie communes had been abandoned. He was the legendary type of the mean yellow dog, and barely deigned to notice the other dogs--or me, for that matter, until the night of the first thunderstorm, when "White Fang" (Rolling Eyes) kept climbing into bed with me, wimpering like a puppy, and nearly crushing the breath out of me. Then he decided we were buddies ("Confidentially, old man, those storms are rather too common in these mountains."). There are precious few squirrels in the Sangre de Cristo, but there is a surfeit of coyotes. Sundance had made it his life's work to kill or run out of Arroyo Seco every coyote he saw. He was in his fullest glory running down the miscreant canid with the full pack baying at his heels . . . and little Twerp, an otherwise entirely silent dog, barking a weird wailing yip. If it became evident that the coyote would escape, and deny Sundance his kill (which was usually the case), the pack would look at one another in sly complicity, and, as if at a signal, all nine dogs would come to a sudden complete halt, but continue to sound for a few seconds. Twerp would shoot on through the pack, hell bent for leather after the coyote, who would eventually trip to the change in the sound of the pursuit, and turn on her. She would then come to an almost screeching halt, and silently sprint for the pack, which sat looking on, slitty-eyed and gape-mouthed, silently laughing among themselves. She never learned, they pulled it on her at least once a week.
0 Replies
 
Piffka
 
  1  
Reply Tue 10 Jun, 2003 08:19 pm
Great stories, Setanta. That Twerp sounds totally amazing. I've never heard of a dog acting like a nurse before. Weren't you just astounded? (You tell it so matter-of-factly, I'd be jumping up and down, using all sorts of exclamation points!) Could she have done that because of some sort of genetic Basenji knowledge? I've never known one, maybe they're strange in lots of ways. I do think it was mean of the rest of the pack to let her get caught up in the coyote chase, but it does sound pretty funny. We have a children's book somewhere, called "Hank, the Cow Dog" (as told by Hank) that used to make us chuckle. Your stories would have fit in well there.

Hope you get up to Beth's and get those photos downloaded. I'm sort of sick thinking that those beautiful fluffy coats and bushy tails are gone. I'm sure their coats will grow back but we've never had our dogs shaved. We'd be totally traumatized, dogs & humans.
0 Replies
 
 

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