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A Lunar Eclipse happening tonight!

 
 
Gen
 
Reply Thu 15 May, 2003 09:31 am
Tonight the moon will be exceptionally large, and we will be experianceing a Total Lunar eclips tonight. Due to dust and debris in our atmosphere, the moon will take on a redish color. Its promising to be quite spectacular! Here are a few links referring to the event.

www.drsky.com
http://www.mreclipse.com/MrEclipse.html#LE

Here are the viewable times from the US
United States: 10pm EST, 9pm Central, 8pm Mountain and Pacific.

I'm gonna be out there looking up with my camera, maybe I can catch something! If I do, i'll post it!
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Type: Discussion • Score: 3 • Views: 4,767 • Replies: 18
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patiodog
 
  1  
Reply Thu 15 May, 2003 09:54 am
Ah, man -- I'm in class at 8:00.
0 Replies
 
Phoenix32890
 
  1  
Reply Thu 15 May, 2003 09:57 am
Patiodog- So stick your head out the window..........or ask the prof to let the class all go outside to see the eclipse!
0 Replies
 
dagmaraka
 
  1  
Reply Thu 15 May, 2003 09:58 am
at 8? i read it will be at 10:36pm. Now if I only remembered which time, was it Eastern time? grrrr.
0 Replies
 
patiodog
 
  1  
Reply Thu 15 May, 2003 10:07 am
It looks to be overcast here, anyway.
0 Replies
 
Piffka
 
  1  
Reply Thu 15 May, 2003 10:16 am
Satt posted some very cool links and graphics about this on an Astrology topic:

Check That Horoscope!

PD -- D'ya think it is really going to be cloudy? I'm thinking of going to Ellensburg. I'd like to see this.
0 Replies
 
quinn1
 
  1  
Reply Thu 15 May, 2003 10:17 am
http://sunearth.gsfc.nasa.gov/eclipse/extra/TLE030515/TLE2003May-EDTs.GIF

The major phases of the eclipse occur as follows (all times are GMT or Greenwich Mean Time). The partial eclipse commences with first umbral contact at 02:03 GMT. Totality begins at 03:14 GMT and lasts until 04:07 GMT. The partial phases end at 05:18 GMT. Eclipse times for time zones in the United States and Canada are shown in the following table.

http://sunearth.gsfc.nasa.gov/eclipse/extra/TLE2003May15.html



Thank Gen....hope perhaps to get a glimpse, if nothing else
0 Replies
 
patiodog
 
  1  
Reply Thu 15 May, 2003 10:19 am
Piffka wrote:
PD -- D'ya think it is really going to be cloudy? I'm thinking of going to Ellensburg. I'd like to see this.


I have no idea. Just what it looks like out my window right now (a method as reliable as the forecasts, it seems).
0 Replies
 
patiodog
 
  1  
Reply Thu 15 May, 2003 10:44 am
(course now it's burned off and the sun is shining.)
0 Replies
 
Piffka
 
  1  
Reply Thu 15 May, 2003 10:45 am
Haha -- no doubt, you've seen those weather forecasting rocks... if it's wet, it's rainy?

Well, we've got sun & blue skies... right now. Who knows what it'll be like in another ten or twelve hours. Nasty, probably.
0 Replies
 
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Thu 15 May, 2003 10:48 am
i sure hope i'm checked into my motel before this happens. I'll be bound to forget and freak out while i'm driving.

<must remember eclipse - must remember eclipse>
0 Replies
 
patiodog
 
  1  
Reply Thu 15 May, 2003 10:48 am
Has it been unusually windy here this winter and spring? I don't remember so much wind the past few years.
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patiodog
 
  1  
Reply Thu 15 May, 2003 10:50 am
ehBeth -- I was driving over Highway 17 in CA (the corridor of death, especially back then, before there was a median divider on the entire thing) in a rainstorm; the clouds broke, revealing a lunar eclipse I hadn't known about, and I almost skidded into the oncoming traffic while I stared at it.
0 Replies
 
Piffka
 
  1  
Reply Fri 16 May, 2003 11:29 am
ehBeth, Did you remember the eclipse? Was it visible?


I just came across this set of interesting facts:

Quote:
Within a given year, a maximum of seven eclipses can occur, either four solar and three lunar or five solar and two lunar.


Who would have thought this many? Why five solar and two lunar? Probably not all are "total" eclipses. I think the numbers have something to do with the nodes of intersecting orbits, the sizes of the orbs and are figured with a mathematical statement. Still, it is a terrific fact.

Quote:
Despite the fact that there are more solar than lunar eclipses each year, over time many more lunar eclipses are seen at any single location on earth than solar eclipses. This occurs because a lunar eclipse can be seen from the entire half of the earth facing the moon at that time, while a solar eclipse is visible only along a narrow path on the earth's surface.
0 Replies
 
Region Philbis
 
  2  
Reply Fri 3 Oct, 2014 01:00 pm
Quote:
Total Lunar Eclipse Next Week Will Turn the Moon Blood Red

Skywatchers across much of the world will have the chance to see the moon glowing with an eerie
red pallor during a pre-Halloween total lunar eclipse next week.

The "blood moon" total lunar eclipse will rise during the full moon of Oct. 8 just before sunrise in
North America, but red might not be the only color people see during the total eclipse. Weather
permitting, it's possible that some sharp-eyed observers might be able to see some blue in the moon's
glow. The event will be the second of four consecutive total lunar eclipses in 2014 and 2015, according
to NASA officials.

On the East Coast of the United States, totality starts at 6:25 a.m. EDT (1025 GMT), but stargazers on
the West Coast of the United States will have an even better chance of seeing the rusty glow of the
moon during totality. The eclipse will occur between 3:25 a.m. PDT and 4:24 a.m. PDT Wednesday.
Observers in Australia and countries along the Pacific Ocean will also have the chance to see the eclipse.
(source)
roger
 
  1  
Reply Fri 3 Oct, 2014 01:49 pm
@Region Philbis,
Consecutive? I'm wondering if I really understand the word.
Region Philbis
 
  1  
Reply Fri 3 Oct, 2014 01:54 pm
@roger,

possibly means there won't be another partial until sometime after the fourth consecutive total...
roger
 
  1  
Reply Fri 3 Oct, 2014 02:05 pm
@Region Philbis,
I see. I was thinking we could also say we are likely to have 12 consecutive full moons in the coming year. We might possibly even have 13.

Anyway, thanks for the heads up.
0 Replies
 
timur
 
  2  
Reply Fri 3 Oct, 2014 02:05 pm
@Region Philbis,
Four successive total eclipses for 2014 and 2015:

Apr 14 - 15, 2014
Oct 8, 2014
Apr 4, 2015
Sept 28, 2015
0 Replies
 
 

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