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Emily Dickinson

 
 
drom et reve
 
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Reply Wed 2 Jun, 2004 11:19 am
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drom et reve
 
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Reply Tue 29 Jun, 2004 02:36 am
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Tarah
 
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Reply Wed 21 Jul, 2004 08:43 am
What an engrossing read. Being British, I don't know much about Emily Dickinson, well not until about half an hour ago!

I noticed in an early message that someone mentioned she wore white. Is that right? Always?

Thanks again for bringing me into your culture.
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drom et reve
 
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Reply Wed 21 Jul, 2004 08:52 am
Hey, Tarah; I'm really glad that you have enjoyed the Emily Dickinson post. I grew up in Britain but I found her when I was fairly young and loved her since. Some people complain about her adherence to rhyme in nearly all of her poems, but I think that it heightens her sense of fun, and is something integral about her.

It's rumoured that she always wore white; yet, most of the few photographs of her show her wearing black; only two show her wearing white. It is weird, how these rumours get about.

Anyway, thank you for reading. I hope that you stick around. It's been quiet since Jjorge and J.D. have been gone; but they'll be back, and until then I'll post their share, too.
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drom et reve
 
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Reply Wed 21 Jul, 2004 08:54 am
The most famous picture of her:

http://www2.english.uiuc.edu/baym/255/dickensn.jpg

and one of her wearing white:

http://www.poetrypoetry.com/images/emily.jpg


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drom et reve
 
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Reply Wed 21 Jul, 2004 08:55 am
I have no life but this,
To lead it here;
Nor any death, but lest
Dispelled from there;

Nor tie to earths to come,
Nor action new,
Except through this extent,
The realm of you.



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Tarah
 
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Reply Wed 21 Jul, 2004 10:00 am
Thanks drom. I've since looked her up on Google and discovered loads about her life. And yes, I also thought it strange that the only photo I saw of her she wasn't in white. In one article it said the photo was taken when she was 17, so perhaps she started wearing white a little later in life. I don't know whether her family had servants but this was certainly in the pre-electric washing machine days so I wouldn't have fancied doing her laundry!

I can almost hear people cringing, but I like rhyming poetry. I shall re-read this thread periodically .... and enjoy it all over again.
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drom et reve
 
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Reply Fri 23 Jul, 2004 05:42 pm
I'm glad that you enjoyed her so much to do research. Did you have any favourite poems amongst the ones that you read?

I don't like most obviously rhyming poetry, but ED is different... unique. And to think that only about seven of her poems saw the light of day during her life.


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drom et reve
 
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Reply Fri 23 Jul, 2004 05:43 pm
OF so divine a loss
We enter but the gain,
Indemnity for loneliness
That such a bliss has been.



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cavfancier
 
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Reply Fri 23 Jul, 2004 05:52 pm
Ooof...so many pages...did I already mention here that one of the most fascinating literature courses I studied was a comparison of the complete works of Dickinson with the complete works of Whitman? I'll never forget how that professor fueled a passion in me for both poets, divided by style, united in spirit.
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drom et reve
 
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Reply Fri 23 Jul, 2004 05:55 pm
That sounds like an exceptionally interesting course, Cav. How long did it last? What were the major continuities? I have allied Whitman to Dickinson in the past, but I never considered it in depth.

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cavfancier
 
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Reply Fri 23 Jul, 2004 05:59 pm
drom, I will have to leave that for another day. It was a full year course. Isolation from society would be the first connection though.
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drom et reve
 
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Reply Fri 23 Jul, 2004 06:25 pm
I look forward to it, although I appreciate that it takes a long time to condense a course that lasted a year. Was it 'Leaves of Grass' that you studied for the Whitman component? I think that I liked all the poems from 'Leaves,' apart from 'O captain,' and one other that I can't remember.



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drom et reve
 
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Reply Fri 23 Jul, 2004 06:26 pm
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cavfancier
 
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Reply Fri 23 Jul, 2004 06:28 pm
It was the most full edition of Leaves of Grass, Whitman's only book. Edited over the years, but remaining true to it's original vision.
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drom et reve
 
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Reply Fri 23 Jul, 2004 07:12 pm
Over here, things aren't that simple; one can get 'Song of myself,' which seems to be mostly later work; 'Leaves of grass,' in varying editions, and 'The Complete Poems', which incorporates it all. Are there particular Whitmans that have stayed with you?


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cavfancier
 
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Reply Sat 24 Jul, 2004 06:37 am
Off the top of my head, I Sing the Body Electric, Out Of The Cradle Endlessly Rocking, Drum Taps, and O You Whom I Often and Silently Come, which I gave to my brother to read at my grandfather's funeral.
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drom et reve
 
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Reply Sun 25 Jul, 2004 04:55 am
They are truly beautiful poems, Cav. I read 'O you whom...' out at two funerals. Perhaps we should make a Whitman thread.


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drom et reve
 
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Reply Mon 26 Jul, 2004 07:46 am
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drom et reve
 
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Reply Wed 11 Aug, 2004 06:39 am
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