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Book recommendations requested for leisure reading

 
 
Gala
 
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Reply Thu 22 Dec, 2005 10:36 am
thanks Green Witch-- but i don't think i'll be able to get through the book based on the Vermeer painting. here's my beef with it: they've turned the image into a cliche, a must have for all romantic college aged art lovers to hang in their dorms...
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yitwail
 
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Reply Thu 22 Dec, 2005 11:33 am
gala, The Beekeeper's Apprentice by Laurie King is clever and amusing, if you haven't read it already.
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Gala
 
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Reply Thu 22 Dec, 2005 12:18 pm
thanks yitwail, from what i viewed it appears to be a page turner-- fast paced and clever as you've said.
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yitwail
 
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Reply Thu 22 Dec, 2005 12:32 pm
good, i hope you enjoy it. it has a minor theological motif i could do without, but that's quibbling.
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Tomkitten
 
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Reply Sat 24 Dec, 2005 11:51 am
Book recommendations
Try "A Long Way Down" by Nick Hornby. Black humor, with extremely clever conversation. Author gets nicely into his characters' minds.
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Gala
 
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Reply Wed 28 Dec, 2005 03:43 pm
Tomkitten, i like Nick Hornby, and i've heard about this latest book, but it seems a tad depressing...what with the suicide motif.
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Tomkitten
 
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Reply Wed 28 Dec, 2005 04:06 pm
Actually, not depressing at all. That was my concern, but when I started reading it didn't turn out that way at all. You'd be surprised.
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boomerang
 
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Reply Wed 28 Dec, 2005 04:10 pm
I didn't think it was depressing either.

Parts of it were pretty sad - the woman and her son were sad, her life was sad.

But she really gave you someone to root for.
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Tomkitten
 
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Reply Wed 28 Dec, 2005 04:16 pm
Anything by Alexander McCall Smith - the ones set in Africa, that is. Forget the mysteries set in Scotland. But if you read the McCall Smith books, take them in order, beginning with The No. One Ladies' Detective Agency. There is a story to follow that runs through the series.
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Tomkitten
 
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Reply Wed 28 Dec, 2005 04:22 pm
You could try "Garlic and Sapphires" by restaurant critic Ruth Reichl. She dons different disguises to prevent the restaurant staff from recognizing her, and puts on a personality to match. Very amusing.

Ian McEwan's "Saturday" is a very good read, a real page turner with lots of tension to grab your interest and hold it.

Almost anything by Jodi Picoult.
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Gala
 
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Reply Wed 28 Dec, 2005 08:32 pm
Tomkitten, I've read the Alexander McCall Smith books, the ones that take place in Africa-- I love that series. I've just looked him up and he has a new one I haven't read yet "In the Company of Cheerful Ladies."

Thanks for the other recommendations. I've made a list and I'll add yours to it.

Boomerang, thanks for the additional input on the Nick Hornby book. I'm a little sceptical, but at some point I may be in the mood.
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roger
 
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Reply Wed 28 Dec, 2005 08:56 pm
For legal fiction "Anatomy of a Murder" beats the others, hands down. Sadly, out of print, and I forget the author's name, anyway.
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Gala
 
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Reply Wed 28 Dec, 2005 09:13 pm
roger, is it Robert Traver? if so, they have it at the local public library here.
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Tomkitten
 
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Reply Wed 28 Dec, 2005 09:15 pm
Yes, it's Robert Traver (although I think that's a pseudonym?)

"Twelve Angry Men" is also good if you like novels with a legal theme.
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Gala
 
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Reply Wed 28 Dec, 2005 09:17 pm
Speaking of legal fiction, I thought "Presumed Innocent" was a good one.
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roger
 
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Reply Wed 28 Dec, 2005 09:29 pm
Robert Traver - yes. If it's in the library, read the first 20 pages. You'll see what I mean.
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