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Google Maps As History Ancillary Science

 
 
Reply Mon 19 Sep, 2005 01:33 pm
A local man used "Google Maps" to find the undiscovered remains of a Roman villa near his town in Italy:

Quote:
Published online: 14 September 2005; | doi:10.1038/news050912-6

Enthusiast uses Google to reveal Roman ruins
Google Earth programme leads to remains of ancient villa.


Declan Butler


http://www.nature.com/news/2005/050912/images/050912-6.jpg
Analysis of a Google map led to the discovery of a Roman villa like this one in Parma, Italy.
© Cultural Ministry Emilia Romagna



Using satellite images from Google Maps and Google Earth, an Italian computer programmer has stumbled upon the remains of an ancient villa. Luca Mori was studying maps of the region around his town of Sorbolo, near Parma, when he noticed a prominent, oval, shaded form more than 500 metres long. It was the meander of an ancient river, visible because former watercourses absorb different amounts of moisture from the air than their surroundings do.

His eye was caught by unusual 'rectangular shadows' nearby. Curious, he analysed the image further, and concluded that the lines must represent a buried structure of human origin. Eventually, he traced out what looked like the inner courtyards of a villa.

Mori, who describes the finding on his blog, Quellí Della Bassa, contacted archaeologists, including experts at the National Archaeological Museum of Parma. They confirmed the find. At first it was thought to be a Bronze Age village, but an inspection of the site turned up ceramic pieces that indicated it was a Roman villa.

"Mori's research is interesting in its approach," says Manuela Catarsi Dall'Aglio, an archaeologist at the National Archaeological Museum of Parma. He says the find may be similar to a villa the museum is currently excavating at Cannetolo di Fontanellato, which was found during the construction of a high-speed rail network. "Only a scientific, archeological dig will tell," he adds.

The local authorities will have to approve any archaeological digs before they can take place.
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roverroad
 
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Reply Tue 20 Sep, 2005 01:05 am
That was undiscovered? It looks like there is a highway in the upper left corner of the picture.

Anyway, those sites are turning up everywhere thanks to Google. They discovered an unknown waterfall in a california state park a couple months ago. Hard to believe there are still places to discover on dry land in the 21st century.
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