6
   

emigrate vs immigrate

 
 
Reply Wed 6 Nov, 2019 04:51 am
Under the CECA, visa regulations for Indian professionals in medicine, engineering, finance and information technology were relaxed, making it easier for them to work and immigrate to Singapore.

Shouldn't it be "emigrate" instead?
 
maxdancona
 
  2  
Reply Wed 6 Nov, 2019 06:52 am
@tanguatlay,
I use the word "immigrate" any time a person is leaving one country and moving to another. You can immigrate from Mexico. You can immigrate to Italy.

People dont normally use the word "emigrate" outside an academic context. It is generally uses to dicuss social trends and mass movements.
0 Replies
 
livinglava
 
  0  
Reply Wed 6 Nov, 2019 07:00 am
Just use 'migrate,' and that covers both emigration and immigration.

"Immigration" and "emigration" are only relevant terms for the governments trying to control migration.

To control emigration-control, you have things like exit visas, bounty hunters, etc. to catch 'runaways' and 'escapees,' whereas for immigration-control you have things like entrance visas, walls and other border control, etc.

If migration posed no threat to non-migratory people, would governments need to control migration?

What if scapegoating migrants provided economic benefits for non-migratory people even when migrants are harmless? In that case, would governments still scapegoat and harass them in order to benefit non-migrants?

Is it possible to have a world where people variously migrate and/or maintain multi-generational communities without harming or exploiting each other? If not, what should be done?

0 Replies
 
tanguatlay
 
  1  
Reply Wed 6 Nov, 2019 09:25 am
Many thanks to both of you.
0 Replies
 
InfraBlue
 
  2  
Reply Wed 6 Nov, 2019 03:54 pm
@tanguatlay,
"Immigrate" is used appropriately seeing as how the sentence is about immigration to Singapore.

"Emigrate" would be used had the sentence been written along the lines of, ". . . making it easier for them to emigrate from India to Singapore."
livinglava
 
  0  
Reply Wed 6 Nov, 2019 06:59 pm
@InfraBlue,
InfraBlue wrote:

"Immigrate" is used appropriately seeing as how the sentence is about immigration to Singapore.

"Emigrate" would be used had the sentence been written along the lines of, ". . . making it easier for them to emigrate from India to Singapore."

You could just say "'migrate' from India to Singapore."

'Immigration' is used to refer to population influx into an area.

'Emigration' is used to refer to population outflux from an area.

If you are referencing the migrant, you can just say 'migrate.'

If you want to refer to the migrant in relation to a source/departure area, you use, 'emigrate,' e.g. 'an emigrant of India' or 'emigrating from India.'

If you want to refer to the migration in relation to a target/arrival area, you use 'immigrate,' e.g. 'an immigrant of Singapore,' or 'immigrating into Singapore.'

I think 'immigrant' and 'immigration' are more prominently used terminologies because of a general bias toward immigration-awareness as nativism leads people to identify and control immigration.

If the primary political interest was in preventing escapes, such as where slavery or other population-retention was a major interest, then there would be more public discourse about 'emigration' and 'emigrants,' along with 'exit-phobia' instead of xenophobia. I.e. political propaganda would be more concerned and angered with people leaving/emigrating than with people coming into an area.

InfraBlue
 
  1  
Reply Wed 6 Nov, 2019 07:19 pm
@livinglava,
The question was specifically about the sentence at hand and the words "immigrate" and "emigrate."
livinglava
 
  0  
Reply Fri 8 Nov, 2019 04:00 pm
@InfraBlue,
InfraBlue wrote:

The question was specifically about the sentence at hand and the words "immigrate" and "emigrate."

So what's your point?
InfraBlue
 
  1  
Reply Fri 8 Nov, 2019 05:26 pm
@livinglava,
Your reply was tangential.
Miss L Toad
 
  1  
Reply Fri 8 Nov, 2019 07:10 pm
@InfraBlue,
Like inappropriate touching only verse.
0 Replies
 
livinglava
 
  1  
Reply Sat 9 Nov, 2019 11:43 am
@InfraBlue,
InfraBlue wrote:

Your reply was tangential.

I did add a little discussion about the ideological/propaganda aspects of the terminology, but it is worth thinking about those when you use these terms.

It would be the same if there was a thread asking whether to use use gender-neutral occupational terms, like 'firefighter' and 'mail carrier,' or whether to use more traditional masculine-universal terms like 'fireman' and 'mail man.'

If someone mentioned gender ideology/propaganda in such a thread, would you say it was tangential?
InfraBlue
 
  1  
Reply Mon 11 Nov, 2019 01:44 pm
@livinglava,
Ideology/propaganda was not mentioned in this thread.
livinglava
 
  1  
Reply Mon 11 Nov, 2019 01:58 pm
@InfraBlue,
InfraBlue wrote:

Ideology/propaganda was not mentioned in this thread.

Language (words and meaning) is already ideological propaganda without it being mentioned as such.
Finn dAbuzz
 
  1  
Reply Mon 11 Nov, 2019 02:16 pm
@tanguatlay,
tanguatlay wrote:

Under the CECA, visa regulations for Indian professionals in medicine, engineering, finance and information technology were relaxed, making it easier for them to work and immigrate to Singapore.

Shouldn't it be "emigrate" instead?



Yes

Regardless of what anyone uses themselves, you emigrate to and then become an immigrant from.
livinglava
 
  1  
Reply Mon 11 Nov, 2019 02:27 pm
@Finn dAbuzz,
Finn dAbuzz wrote:

Regardless of what anyone uses themselves, you emigrate to and then become an immigrant from.

Or you just migrate from place to place and then people refer to you with terms like 'migrant/emigrant/immigrant' because they want to differentiate migrants from others who don't migrate for some reason, probably having to do with the maintenance of privileged status as a multigenerational denizen/citizen.

The Americas are full of migrants from Europe, just as Europe is full of migrants from Rome; but because those migrants have established themselves as multi-generational denizens/citizens, they distinguish themselves from other newer migrants.

Humans have been a nomadic species since before they were a species, yet we are also good at territorializing places and then defining identities in terms of those places.
0 Replies
 
InfraBlue
 
  1  
Reply Tue 12 Nov, 2019 02:09 pm
@livinglava,
That is not what this thread is about.
livinglava
 
  1  
Reply Wed 13 Nov, 2019 12:48 pm
@InfraBlue,
InfraBlue wrote:

That is not what this thread is about.

You assume you understand what is relevant and what isn't, but your assumptions about relevance may not be relevant.
InfraBlue
 
  1  
Reply Wed 13 Nov, 2019 04:05 pm
@livinglava,
livinglava wrote:

InfraBlue wrote:

That is not what this thread is about.

You assume you understand what is relevant and what isn't, but your assumptions about relevance may not be relevant.


This post is irrelevant to the thread.
livinglava
 
  1  
Reply Wed 13 Nov, 2019 05:18 pm
@InfraBlue,
InfraBlue wrote:

livinglava wrote:

InfraBlue wrote:

That is not what this thread is about.

You assume you understand what is relevant and what isn't, but your assumptions about relevance may not be relevant.


This post is irrelevant to the thread.

What authority do you claim over the thread, exactly?

We are both immigrants of this thread, are we not?

Shouldn't we consult the thread's king to decree what is relevant and what not?

And if the king takes your side, would you like me to emigrate?
0 Replies
 
hingehead
 
  3  
Reply Fri 15 Nov, 2019 07:58 am
You emigrate from a country, you immigrate into a country.

https://writingexplained.org/immigrate-vs-emigrate-what-are-the-differences-between-immigration-and-emigration
 

 
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