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Question on Woods

 
 
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Sun 5 Jun, 2005 05:16 am
so you use the chisel method? Im still not certain I understand your need for flame protection.
There is a way that you can make your work more flame retardent, make molds of your work and use a Rock flour/polymer casting process (marbleite etc).
0 Replies
 
AngeliqueEast
 
  1  
Reply Sun 5 Jun, 2005 05:37 am
farmerman wrote:
so you use the chisel method? Im still not certain I understand your need for flame protection.
There is a way that you can make your work more flame retardent, make molds of your work and use a Rock flour/polymer casting process (marbleite etc).



I do not need flame protection. We have just been tossing around possible reasons as to why wood might not burn.

The process you mentioned above, can that be used for woodcut carvings? Won't that clog the lines, and interfere with the printing of the image? I don't think we are talking about the same kind of carving. But, I like the information you gave me Farmerman.

Thanks
0 Replies
 
neko nomad
 
  1  
Reply Sun 5 Jun, 2005 06:53 am
To keep this little discussion simmering,angie, check out the properties at this website. Scroll down to Physical and Chemical Properties and you will see that NFPA has rated PEG's flammability as zero.

Seems to me that a wood which has absorbed PEG would be quite difficult to set afire. Hence, the non-burning chair.
0 Replies
 
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Sun 5 Jun, 2005 08:05 am
Please, neko. PEG is an organic liquid, when you soak something in it and give it a flame the PEG will act as a wax and extend the burn. Here is JT Bakers MSDS on the flammability of PEG (JT Baker is a sub of Mallinkrodt, and they make the stuff)
Quote:
5. Fire Fighting Measures
Fire:
As with most organic solids, fire is possible at elevated temperatures or by contact with an ignition source. (increases as molecular weight increases). Flash point: 182 - 287 C.
Explosion:
Fine dust dispersed in air in sufficient concentrations, and in the presence of an ignition source is a potential dust explosion hazard.
Fire Extinguishing Media:
Water spray, dry chemical, alcohol foam, or carbon dioxide.
Special Information:
In the event of a fire, wear full protective clothing and NIOSH-approved self-contained breathing apparatus with full facepiece operated in the pressure demand or other positive pressure mode.

0 Replies
 
AngeliqueEast
 
  1  
Reply Sun 5 Jun, 2005 08:57 am
I sent an em to the TV station (for more information) that aired the story about the chair, but no answer yet.
0 Replies
 
neko nomad
 
  1  
Reply Mon 6 Jun, 2005 07:45 am
My second guess, Angelique-- probably closer to the explanation-- is that the wood was green,which is easiest to carve, and its non-burning aspect was emphasized for sensationalism.
0 Replies
 
AngeliqueEast
 
  1  
Reply Mon 6 Jun, 2005 07:53 am
You could be right neko, thanks for your help.
0 Replies
 
hightor
 
  1  
Reply Thu 25 Jan, 2018 05:46 am
Teak (Techtona grandis) is quite resistant to burning because of its high silica content.
0 Replies
 
 

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