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England fans make feelings.....

 
 
Reply Wed 19 Jun, 2019 07:16 pm
Would you please explain the meaning of "make feelings" in the headline below?

England fans make feelings on VAR crystal clear with chant vs Switzerland

Thank you.

Thank you
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Type: Question • Score: 1 • Views: 465 • Replies: 18
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tsarstepan
 
  2  
Reply Wed 19 Jun, 2019 07:25 pm
@paok1970,
You do realize that not all published headlines are well written (and often contain grammatical and other mistakes), right? If it's a pun, it eludes me. Best case scenario, it's a Brit English idiom/slang phrase.

The headline alone isn't enough context to suss out the definition of this seemingly nonsensical turn of phrase.
0 Replies
 
Jewels Vern
 
  2  
Reply Wed 19 Jun, 2019 08:47 pm
@paok1970,
"England fans make feelings on VAR crystal clear with chant vs Switzerland."

The active phrase is "make feelings clear". If feelings were not clear before, they have now been made crystal clear.
izzythepush
 
  1  
Reply Thu 20 Jun, 2019 12:59 am
@paok1970,
The VAR ruled out a goal, and the fans chanted ******* VAR.

That let their feelings be known alright, that they don't like VAR.
0 Replies
 
izzythepush
 
  1  
Reply Fri 21 Jun, 2019 10:59 am
@Jewels Vern,
It's make feelings known, it's not American English.
paok1970
 
  0  
Reply Fri 21 Jun, 2019 01:02 pm
@izzythepush,
izzythepush wrote:

It's make feelings known, it's not American English.


What does it mean? Would you please explain the above sentence/statement further?

Thank you.
izzythepush
 
  1  
Reply Fri 21 Jun, 2019 01:13 pm
@paok1970,
JV said the active phrase was make feelings clear. Not over here, we say make feelings known and the article itself is English.
engineer
 
  1  
Reply Fri 21 Jun, 2019 01:27 pm
@paok1970,
The fans are not happy with the review system. To express they weren't happy, they chanted an obscenity. If someone did not know how the fans felt, they made their feelings known. If someone was uncertain of how the fans felt, they clarified their position or made their feelings clear.
0 Replies
 
paok1970
 
  -1  
Reply Fri 21 Jun, 2019 01:30 pm
@izzythepush,
I'm still confused. The above headline is from a British newspaper if I remember correctly and contains the word "clear" not "known".
engineer
 
  1  
Reply Fri 21 Jun, 2019 01:41 pm
@paok1970,
To make something clear is to remove any confusion. It is related to the word clarify.

clar·i·fy

verb
1. make (a statement or situation) less confused and more clearly comprehensible.
"the report managed to clarify the government's position"
synonyms: make clear, shed light on, throw light on, elucidate, illuminate, make plain, make simple, simplify;
0 Replies
 
izzythepush
 
  1  
Reply Fri 21 Jun, 2019 01:46 pm
@paok1970,
That's because it's part of the phrase crystal clear. That adds a lot of emphasis.
paok1970
 
  -1  
Reply Fri 21 Jun, 2019 02:38 pm
@izzythepush,
Still confused. To recapitulate/recap: the headline is written in British English but contains the AmE expression "to make something crystal clear " while in England you say "to make something known". Am I right or am I daydreaming? Thanks for your patience.
izzythepush
 
  1  
Reply Fri 21 Jun, 2019 03:11 pm
@paok1970,
Crystal clear is not just American English.

It not to make something known, it's to make your feelings known, it's specific.
paok1970
 
  -1  
Reply Fri 21 Jun, 2019 07:39 pm
@izzythepush,
izzythepush wrote:

It not to make something known,


I'm sorry to bother you again with another question but I don't understand the part quoted above. Did you mean to write, "It is not to make something known,....."? Was it a typo? If not, please explain/clarify. Thank you.
Jewels Vern
 
  -2  
Reply Fri 21 Jun, 2019 11:20 pm
@izzythepush,
So what? The meaning is the same.
izzythepush
 
  1  
Reply Sat 22 Jun, 2019 04:17 am
@paok1970,
It was a typo.
0 Replies
 
izzythepush
 
  2  
Reply Sat 22 Jun, 2019 04:21 am
@Jewels Vern,
The phrasing isn't. It makes a big difference when someone wants to differentiate between English and American English.

Certain phrases/idioms are unique to regions, and when someone like yourself speaks with authority from a point of ignorance you end up confusing people.

Unlike you, I don't make such sweeping statements I say how English is spoken in England. I make it clear that the Americans/Australians/Jamaicans/Africans may express things differently.
Jewels Vern
 
  1  
Reply Sat 22 Jun, 2019 03:12 pm
@izzythepush,
You are trying to manufacture confusion where none exists.
izzythepush
 
  1  
Reply Sat 22 Jun, 2019 03:29 pm
@Jewels Vern,
Bollocks I am. You're trying to speak with authority about all English variants instead of stating you're talking about American English only. Which to be fair a lot of other Americans already do, like Tsarsepan.

tsarstepan wrote:

If it's a pun, it eludes me. Best case scenario, it's a Brit English idiom/slang phrase.
0 Replies
 
 

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