1
   

This is her, This is she, This is I, This is me

 
 
Reply Fri 29 Dec, 2017 03:49 pm
Which of the following answers is correct below?

(on the phone) Hello, is this Louise?

This is her

This is she

This is I

This is me


Thank you
  • Topic Stats
  • Top Replies
  • Link to this Topic
Type: Question • Score: 1 • Views: 349 • Replies: 12
No top replies

 
centrox
 
  1  
Reply Fri 29 Dec, 2017 05:13 pm
Define "correct".
layman
 
  0  
Reply Fri 29 Dec, 2017 10:05 pm
@paok1970,
paok1970 wrote:

Which of the following answers is correct below?

(on the phone) Hello, is this Louise?

This is her

This is she

This is I

This is me


Thank you


Sounds like a simple, one-word response would suffice, eh? To wit: "Yes."
0 Replies
 
layman
 
  0  
Reply Fri 29 Dec, 2017 10:05 pm
@paok1970,
paok1970 wrote:

Which of the following answers is correct below?

(on the phone) Hello, is this Louise?

This is her

This is she

This is I

This is me


Thank you


Sounds like a simple, one-word response would suffice, eh? To wit: "Yes."
0 Replies
 
paok1970
 
  1  
Reply Fri 29 Dec, 2017 10:28 pm
@centrox,
How should I answer the question below?

(on the phone) Hello, is this/that Louise?

1) This/That is her/she

or

2) This/That is I/me

Thank you



0 Replies
 
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Fri 29 Dec, 2017 11:04 pm
@paok1970,
Yes.
layman
 
  0  
Reply Sat 30 Dec, 2017 08:15 am
@ehBeth,
ehBeth wrote:

Yes.


Me, I would never say "yes." I would answer by saying "Who the **** is asking, and why are you asking?"
layman
 
  1  
Reply Sat 30 Dec, 2017 09:29 am
@layman,
I'm sure we've all been exposed to a situation where you answer your phone only to have the person calling ask: "Who is this?"

If they don't know, then why are they calling? My invariable response is "Who are you?" 9 out of 10 times I figure it's the damn pigs calling, trying to see if I'm at home so they can come execute an arrest warrant on me, ya know?
0 Replies
 
centrox
 
  1  
Reply Sat 30 Dec, 2017 02:58 pm
Sometimes I call people from my office, and I am required to get them to say who they are first, so I say "Who am I speaking to?" or "Can I speak to xxxx?"

0 Replies
 
TheParser
 
  2  
Reply Sun 31 Dec, 2017 09:15 am
@paok1970,

If you wish to follow traditionally correct English grammar, you should probably answer: Yes, this is SHE.

a. This = subject
b. is = linking verb
c. she = subjective complement. (You need the nominative case after a linking verb, NOT the objective case "her.")

In reality, however, probably most native American speakers say "her."

If you say "she," some people may think that you are being snobbish, and some people (who do not know the rule) may think that you are speaking "bad" English!
layman
 
  0  
Reply Sun 31 Dec, 2017 09:18 am
@TheParser,
Yeah, I would get snobbish about it, if I were her, and say "You're talking to she, fool, what the **** do you want?"
TheParser
 
  1  
Reply Sun 31 Dec, 2017 09:25 am
@layman,
Thank you for your very humorous comment.

So that we do not confuse our learner friends, your sentence -- as you know -- should be:

"You're talking to HER, fool. What the f*ck do you want?"

After a preposition such as "to," we always use the objective form ("her").

Sadly, I sometimes hear native speakers say something like: "I gave some donuts to Tony and she."
0 Replies
 
camlok
 
  1  
Reply Sat 20 Jan, 2018 10:14 pm
@TheParser,
Quote:
If you wish to follow traditionally correct English grammar, you should probably answer: Yes, this is SHE.

a. This = subject
b. is = linking verb
c. she = subjective complement. (You need the nominative case after a linking verb, NOT the objective case "her.")

In reality, however, probably most native American speakers say "her."

If you say "she," some people may think that you are being snobbish, and some people (who do not know the rule) may think that you are speaking "bad" English!


This is another of those silly prescriptions. Reality, as you have noted, Parser, has most speakers using the objective case. Why? Because the "traditionally correct English" was just another prescriptivist's lame attempt at trying to foist false rules upon English speakers, who, obviously, know the rules of English much better.

0 Replies
 
 

Related Topics

 
  1. Forums
  2. » This is her, This is she, This is I, This is me
Copyright © 2019 MadLab, LLC :: Terms of Service :: Privacy Policy :: Page generated in 0.05 seconds on 10/22/2019 at 02:57:09