8
   

7 Missing after Destroyer hits Merchant Ship

 
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Fri 17 Jul, 2020 09:10 am
Meanwhile, crews have extinguished all known fires aboard Bonhomme Richard that burned for four days at its mooring in San Diego, a top admiral said on Thursday, but it was still unclear if the ship could be saved.
0 Replies
 
Ragman
 
  1  
Reply Fri 17 Jul, 2020 12:55 pm
@edgarblythe,
I believe some fires were at nuclear facilities. It was reported by CNN on July 6 that Iran’s well known Natanz nuclear facility was damaged.
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Fri 17 Jul, 2020 01:02 pm
@Ragman,
There have been dozens of recent fires and explosions across Iran’s forests, factories and military and nuclear facilities in the past three months.

Most recently besides those already mentioned: on Tuesday an aluminium factory in the industrial city of Lamard, in Fars Province, caught fire. On Sunday, a fire broke out at petrochemical plant in Khuzestan Province.
There have also been explosions at two power plants, a chlorine gas leak at a chemical plant and an explosion at a missile production factory at a military complex in Tehran.
0 Replies
 
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Fri 17 Jul, 2020 01:23 pm
I thought first of Israel and the US. But now I wonder if domestic forces are at work.
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Fri 4 Sep, 2020 12:06 am
@edgarblythe,
NTSB Says Navy Bridge Team Failure Caused USS Fitzgerald Collision
Quote:
The U.S. National Transportation Safety Board has issued four safety recommendations in its 34-page final report from the agency’s years-long investigation into the 2017 collision between the guided missile destroyer USS Fitzgerald and a merchant containership.

The collision occurred shortly after the 504.5 foot-long Fitzgerald, with 315 people on board, departed its homeport of Yokosuka, Japan, bound for the Philippines. The Fitzgerald was traveling southbound at about 22 knots in the bay of Sagami Nada off Japan’s Honshu Island when it collided with the 730 foot-long container ship ACX Crystal with 21 people on board, according to the NTSB. No radio contact was made between the vessels, the NTSB said. The ACX Crystal sustained only minor damage to its bow and no injuries.

Seven sailors aboard the Fitzgerald died in the accident and three others suffered serious injuries.

The NTSB was the lead federal agency for the investigation and delegated its authority to the U.S. Coast Guard to gather documents and perform interviews on behalf of the NTSB.

Marine Accident Report 20/02 includes 11 findings, seven identified safety issues and four safety recommendations, as well as the probable cause of the accident.

Probable Cause

In the report, the NTSB stated the probable cause as the Fitzgerald’s bridge team’s failure to take early and substantial action to avoid collision as the give-way vessel in a crossing situation. Also contributing was the ineffective communication and cooperation among the crew on the Fitzgerald’s bridge and combat information center, coupled with the commanding officer’s insufficient planning for the hazards of the destroyer’s intended transit.

As for the ACX Crystal, the watch officer’s lack of early detection of the Fitzgerald and insufficient actions to avoid collision, once in doubt of the destroyer’s intentions, also contributed, the NTSB said.

“This tragedy highlights the importance of keeping a vigilant watch, determining the risk of collision, and the role of the Automatic Identification System,” said Morgan Turrell, Acting Director of the NTSB’s Office of Marine Safety. “If you are in doubt of another vessel’s intentions, you need to use proper sound and visual signals, and then take early and effective action to avoid a collision.”

Safety Issues

In addition insufficient training of the Fitzgerald’s crew and crew fatigue, the NTSB said the regular practice of U.S. Navy vessels not broadcasting automatic identification system (AIS) signals as one of the key safety issues in the accident. On the day of the accident, the Fitzgerald was not transmitting its data, although it was receiving information about other vessels in the area.

The NTSB’s report also highlighted the failure of both ships’ crews to take actions in accordance with the Convention on the International Regulations for Preventing Collisions at Sea; insufficient oversight and directive by the U.S. Navy; the commanding officer’s inadequate assessment of the transit route’s hazards; and the commanding officer’s decision to not augment bridge watchstanding personnel with a more experienced officer.

Safety Recommendations

As a result of the investigation, the NTSB issued a total of four safety recommendations, including three to the Navy and one to Sea Quest Management Inc., the operator of the ACX Crystal.

For the Navy, two safety recommendation call for review and revision of fleet-wide training and qualification requirements for officers of the deck related to the collision regulations, as well as review and revision of bridge resource management training. The third seeks to broadcast of automatic identification system information when in the vicinity of commercial vessel traffic, at all times, unless such broadcast could compromise tactical operations.

The safety recommendation issued to Sea Quest Management Inc., meanwhile, seeks additional training for navigation officers on collision avoidance regulations, radar and automatic radar plotting aids.


Full report Collision between US Navy Destroyer Fitzgerald and Philippine-Flag Container Ship ACX Crystal
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  2  
Reply Fri 5 Nov, 2021 09:10 am
The accident of the "USS Connecticut" in the South China Sea has consequences: Three responsible officers have to go. The collision of the nuclear submarine was avoidable, the US Navy declared.

USS Connecticut’s leadership fired following undersea mountain collision
Quote:
[...]
While experts told Navy Times this week that operating undetected in the South China Sea’s shallow and mountainous terrain is always a challenge, the relief suggests that higher-ups believe the collision was preventable.
[...]


Seamounts are a persistent challenge for submarines, and it takes careful planning and execution to avoid running into one.
https://i.imgur.com/qj7yFS1.jpg
Portions of the South China Sea have been labelled dangerous grounds on maps for centuries.

0 Replies
 
 

 
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