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Hell: Exothermic or Endothermic?

 
 
Reply Tue 9 Nov, 2004 03:45 pm
First, we need to know how the mass of Hell is changing in time. So
we need to know the rate at which souls are moving into Hell and the
rate at which they are leaving. I think that we can safely assume that
once a soul gets to Hell, it will not leave. Therefore, no souls are
leaving.
As for how many souls are entering Hell, let's look at the
different religions that exist in the world today. Most of these
religions state that if you are not a member of their religion, you will
go to Hell. Since there is more than one of these religions and since
people do not belong to more than one religion, we can project that all
souls go to Hell.
With birth and death rates as they are, we can expect the number of
souls in Hell to increase exponentially. Now, we look at the rate of
change of the volume in Hell because Boyle's Law states that in order
for the temperature and pressure in Hell to stay the same, the volume of
Hell has to expand proportionately as souls are added.
This gives two possibilities:
1. If Hell is expanding at a slower rate than the rate at which souls
enter Hell, then the temperature and pressure in Hell will increase
until all Hell breaks loose.
2. If Hell is expanding at a rate faster than the increase of souls in
Hell, then the temperature and pressure will drop until Hell freezes
over.
So which is it?
If we accept the postulate given to me by squinney one day last week when she was pissed off that, " it will be a cold day in Hell before I sleep with you, and take into account the fact that I slept with her last night, then number 2 must be true, and thus I am sure that Hell is exothermic and has already frozen over. The corollary of this theory is that since Hell has frozen over, it follows that it is not accepting any more souls and is therefore, extinct...leaving only Heaven thereby proving the existance of a devine being which explains why, last night, squinney kept shouting "Oh my God."
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cavfancier
 
  1  
Reply Tue 9 Nov, 2004 04:12 pm
A Response from a Professor of Classics at U. Iowa

Now, in Dante's description, upper Hell has regions of intense heat/falling flame, etc, while the very bottom is in fact a frozen lake. This would suggest that while upper hell is largely static, lower hell is rapidly expanding and/or accomodates fewer souls. Since the bottom contains Satan and the worst sinners, the latter explanation (fewer souls) would seem to apply, whereas simply being in the wrong religion would be accomodated above, hence the more intense heat.
0 Replies
 
Lady J
 
  1  
Reply Tue 9 Nov, 2004 04:15 pm
Absolutely, positively, indisputably correct you are, Bi-Polar Bear! Very Happy
0 Replies
 
Kedge
 
  1  
Reply Thu 18 Nov, 2004 08:46 am
Quote:
Hell has to expand proportionately as souls are added.
This gives two possibilities:
1. If Hell is expanding at a slower rate than the rate at which souls
enter Hell, then the temperature and pressure in Hell will increase
until all Hell breaks loose.
2. If Hell is expanding at a rate faster than the increase of souls in
Hell, then the temperature and pressure will drop until Hell freezes
over.
So which is it?


There is a 3rd posibility
3. If Hell is expanding at a rate equal to the increase of souls in Hell, then the pressure and temperature will remain constant.

However, surely there is only a finite amount that Hell can expand into before it reaches maximum capacity. My question is what happens when this capacity has been met?
0 Replies
 
cavfancier
 
  1  
Reply Thu 18 Nov, 2004 08:50 am
Kedge wrote:
Quote:
Hell has to expand proportionately as souls are added.
This gives two possibilities:
1. If Hell is expanding at a slower rate than the rate at which souls
enter Hell, then the temperature and pressure in Hell will increase
until all Hell breaks loose.
2. If Hell is expanding at a rate faster than the increase of souls in
Hell, then the temperature and pressure will drop until Hell freezes
over.
So which is it?


There is a 3rd posibility
3. If Hell is expanding at a rate equal to the increase of souls in Hell, then the pressure and temperature will remain constant.

However, surely there is only a finite amount that Hell can expand into before it reaches maximum capacity. My question is what happens when this capacity has been met?


When hell's capacity has been met, that's when the deus ex machina appears and says "You are all going back to Kansas, this was only a dream."
0 Replies
 
Wolf ODonnell
 
  1  
Reply Fri 19 Nov, 2004 10:06 am
Re: Hell: Exothermic or Endothermic?
Bi-Polar Bear wrote:
First, we need to know how the mass of Hell is changing in time. So
we need to know the rate at which souls are moving into Hell and the
rate at which they are leaving. I think that we can safely assume that
once a soul gets to Hell, it will not leave. Therefore, no souls are
leaving.


Unless, of course you believe in Feng Du (Chinese Hell) in which souls can leave unless they've committed one of the Ten Unpardonable Sins and unless they haven't repented.
0 Replies
 
 

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