1
   

should i omit "for" in the following situation?

 
 
Reply Wed 26 Apr, 2017 07:31 pm
i slept (for) 30 minutes longer than i should have.

Thanks.
  • Topic Stats
  • Top Replies
  • Link to this Topic
Type: Question • Score: 1 • Views: 392 • Replies: 11
No top replies

 
tibbleinparadise
 
  1  
Reply Wed 26 Apr, 2017 07:35 pm
@perennialloner,
If you want to be super efficient you could trim that down to:

I overslept thirty minutes.

In your sentence "for" is unnecessary, but I doubt many would call you out on it.
perennialloner
 
  1  
Reply Wed 26 Apr, 2017 07:48 pm
@tibbleinparadise,
i am just trying to figure out the most common and natural-sounding English speech. Would it be preferable to omit "for" or would it not matter?
roger
 
  1  
Reply Wed 26 Apr, 2017 09:27 pm
@perennialloner,
For "common and natural sounding", I am slightly inclined to keep the 'for' in your example. Sometimes. I wouldn't even notice the difference most of the time.
0 Replies
 
centrox
 
  1  
Reply Sat 29 Apr, 2017 02:10 am
@perennialloner,
perennialloner wrote:
i am just trying to figure out the most common and natural-sounding English speech.

If you want 'natural sounding speech', get rid of the 30 minutes and use 'half an hour' (British English) or 'a half hour' (US English). You are talking about spoken and not written English?
perennialloner
 
  1  
Reply Sat 29 Apr, 2017 07:57 am
@centrox,
I'm interested in the "for" part. I know it's common to use half an hour in place of 30 minutes. And I guess I'm talking about verbal expression as a whole, so both spoken and written, although they do differ. Most common, natural-sounding, "good" English speech seems like an oxymoron, and maybe is one, but that's what I'm asking about.

1. I'm going in (to the [noun]) for (half an hour). OR, I'm going in (to the [noun] half an hour).

2. They completed their project for the whole class period. OR, they completed the project the whole class period.

In these examples, the inclusion of "for" seems better in terms of clarity, but I'm sure people using common speech forgo these. Would they be okay to also omit in writing?




centrox
 
  1  
Reply Sat 29 Apr, 2017 08:12 am
@perennialloner,
perennialloner wrote:
1. I'm going in (to the [noun]) for (half an hour). OR, I'm going in (to the [noun] half an hour).

The second example is not good English.

I'm going in (to the [noun]) ... the use of 'in to' here is problematic. Did you mean 'into'?

"for half an hour" ... 'for' used with periods of time expresses duration. 'I am going into the house for half an hour' means 'I am going into the house and will be there until half an hour has passed'.

Quote:
2. They completed their project for the whole class period.

This means they spent the whole class period completing their project.

Quote:
they completed the project the whole class period.

Bad English.

perennialloner
 
  1  
Reply Sat 29 Apr, 2017 08:16 am
@centrox,
Can't "going in" be a phrasal verb? So rather than say "going into" to mean " to enter," I'm saying "going in to the office" to mean "i'm going to do work--in the office"?

I don't think it's problematic.
centrox
 
  1  
Reply Sat 29 Apr, 2017 08:20 am
@perennialloner,
perennialloner wrote:
Can't "going in" be a phrasal verb? So rather than say "going into" to mean " to enter," I'm saying "going in to the office" to mean "i'm going to do work--in the office"?

I would write "I'm going into work/the office". When speaking, of course, there is little or no difference between 'in to' and 'into'.

perennialloner
 
  1  
Reply Sat 29 Apr, 2017 08:23 am
@centrox,
Yes, but it would mean something different. Maybe it's an American thing.
0 Replies
 
centrox
 
  1  
Reply Sat 29 Apr, 2017 08:31 am
http://blog.oxforddictionaries.com/2015/08/in-to-versus-into/
0 Replies
 
ekename
 
  1  
Reply Sun 30 Apr, 2017 02:24 am
@perennialloner,
Quote:
i slept (for) 30 minutes longer than i should have.


The sentence itself is ceaselessly soporific.
0 Replies
 
 

Related Topics

There is a word for that! - Discussion by wandeljw
Best Euphemism for death and dying.... - Discussion by tsarstepan
Let pupils abandon spelling rules, says academic - Discussion by Robert Gentel
Help me!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! - Question by lululucy
phrase/name of male seducer - Question by Zah03
Shameful sexist languge must be banned! - Question by neologist
Three Word Phrase I REALLY Hate to See - Discussion by hawkeye10
Is History an art or a science? - Question by Olivier5
"Rooms" in a cave - Question by shua
 
  1. Forums
  2. » should i omit "for" in the following situation?
Copyright © 2018 MadLab, LLC :: Terms of Service :: Privacy Policy :: Page generated in 0.03 seconds on 07/20/2018 at 10:20:02