0
   

Use a comma in place of "is" or "are" or leave them out?

 
 
Reply Sat 4 Feb, 2017 02:19 pm
1. The students are equally bright and their thoughts are equally valued.
2. The students are equally bright and their thoughts, equally valued.
3. The students are equally bright and their thoughts (are) equally valued.

Are these all acceptable?
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Type: Question • Score: 0 • Views: 616 • Replies: 16
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layman
 
  -1  
Reply Sat 4 Feb, 2017 02:38 pm
@perennialloner,
perennialloner wrote:

1. The students are equally bright and their thoughts are equally valued.
2. The students are equally bright and their thoughts, equally valued.
3. The students are equally bright and their thoughts (are) equally valued.

Are these all acceptable?



I am the farthest thing from an accomplished grammarian, but if you ask me, yes, they all seem acceptable. That said, #2 strikes me as an unusual construction which would not commonly be used. I think it gets the point across effectively, but it may not be grammatically correct.
perennialloner
 
  1  
Reply Sat 4 Feb, 2017 02:58 pm
@layman,
Thanks for the reply!
0 Replies
 
centrox
 
  1  
Reply Sat 4 Feb, 2017 03:24 pm
I agree with layman, and I think no. 2 would be best, with the comma left out.
layman
 
  -1  
Reply Sat 4 Feb, 2017 03:43 pm
@centrox,
centrox wrote:

I agree with layman, and I think no. 2 would be best, with the comma left out.



You like #3, in other words, eh?

I would probably just be prosaic about it and go with the mundane #1.
centrox
 
  1  
Reply Sat 4 Feb, 2017 03:45 pm
@layman,
layman wrote:
You like #3, in other words, eh?

Yes. 
MontereyJack
 
  1  
Reply Sat 4 Feb, 2017 05:08 pm
@centrox,
They're all valid, tho 1 sounds the most natural, and assuming you're not actually including the parentheses if yhou go with 3.
0 Replies
 
perennialloner
 
  1  
Reply Sat 4 Feb, 2017 06:04 pm
Thanks to everyone who replied!

Another question.

1. The students are equally bright; their thoughts equally valued.

Is this also acceptable?
centrox
 
  1  
Reply Sat 4 Feb, 2017 06:16 pm
@perennialloner,
perennialloner wrote:

Thanks to everyone who replied!

Another question.

1. The students are equally bright; their thoughts equally valued.

Is this also acceptable?


yes. A semicolon can be used between two closely related independent clauses, provided they are not already joined by a coordinating conjunction.
perennialloner
 
  1  
Reply Sat 4 Feb, 2017 06:39 pm
@centrox,
Thank you. What about the reverse?

The students equally bright; their thoughts are equally valued.
MontereyJack
 
  1  
Reply Sat 4 Feb, 2017 07:41 pm
@perennialloner,
No. I think you neepd to hapve a verb actually used and understood before you csn omit it.

I
perennialloner
 
  1  
Reply Sun 5 Feb, 2017 06:22 am
@MontereyJack,
Will you please elaborate?

At first I thought that too, but I have a verb actually used and understood, after the semi colon? Since the two sentences don't function independently--they influence each other--don't you think it is acceptable?
centrox
 
  1  
Reply Sun 5 Feb, 2017 06:38 am
@perennialloner,
perennialloner wrote:

Will you please elaborate?

At first I thought that too, but I have a verb actually used and understood, after the semi colon? Since the two sentences don't function independently--they influence each other--don't you think it is acceptable?

No. This would work:

The students are equally bright; their thoughts equally valued.
perennialloner
 
  1  
Reply Sun 5 Feb, 2017 06:57 am
@centrox,
Okay. Thanks.
0 Replies
 
centrox
 
  1  
Reply Sun 5 Feb, 2017 07:04 am
To be implicitly understood later, the verb has to come first.

The students are equally bright; their thoughts equally valued; their clothes equally well made; their shoes equally clean.


0 Replies
 
layman
 
  0  
Reply Sun 5 Feb, 2017 02:24 pm
@perennialloner,
perennialloner wrote:

Will you please elaborate?

At first I thought that too, but I have a verb actually used and understood, after the semi colon? Since the two sentences don't function independently--they influence each other--don't you think it is acceptable?


I don't speak German, but I still find what Twain said about the language rather humorous. I agree with what other poster said about this, so this doesn't really add anything beyond a novel way of making the same point:

Quote:
“A verb has a hard enough time of it in this world when it is all together. It's downright inhuman to split it up. But that's what those Germans do. They take part of a verb and put it down here, like a stake, and they take the other part of it and put it a way over yonder like another stake, and between these two limits they just shovel in German.”
centrox
 
  1  
Reply Sun 5 Feb, 2017 03:00 pm
@layman,
layman wrote:
I still find what Twain said about the language rather humorous.

Have you read his humorous piece about masturbation? (Yes, really.)

http://www.textfiles.com/etext/AUTHORS/TWAIN/onanism.txt

Quote:
Of all the various kinds of sexual intercourse, this has the
least to recommend it. As an amusement, it is too fleeting; as an
occupation, it is too wearing; as a public exhibition, there is no
money in it. It is unsuited to the drawing room, and in the most
cultured society it has long been banished from the social board.
It has at last, in our day of progress and improvement, been
degraded to brotherhood with flatulence. Among the best bred,
these two arts are now indulged in only private--though by consent
of the whole company, when only males are present, it is still
permissible, in good society, to remove the embargo on the
fundamental sigh.
0 Replies
 
 

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