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Chew each bite one hundred times

 
 
Reply Wed 4 Jan, 2017 04:50 pm
Wikipedia
Horace Fletcher (1849–1919) was an American health food enthusiast of the Victorian era who earned the nickname "The Great Masticator", by arguing that food should be chewed about 100 times per minute before being swallowed: "Nature will castigate those who don't masticate". He made elaborate justifications for his claim.

Fletcher and his followers recited and followed his instructions religiously, even claiming that liquids, too, had to be chewed in order to be properly mixed with saliva. Fletcher argued that his mastication method will increase the amount of strength a person could have while actually decreasing the amount of food that he consumed.[1] Fletcher promised that "Fletcherizing", as it became known, would turn "a pitiable glutton into an intelligent epicurean".

Fletcher also advised against eating before being "Good and Hungry", or while angry or sad. Fletcher would claim that knowing exactly what was in the food one consumed was important. He stated that different foods have different waste materials, so knowing what type of waste one was going to have in one’s body was valuable knowledge, thus critical to one’s overall well being (The New Glutton, 1906, 132-133). He promoted his theories for decades on lecture circuits, and became a millionaire. Upton Sinclair, Henry James and John D. Rockefeller were among those who gave his ideas a try. Henry James and Mark Twain were visitors to his palazzo in Venice. He lived in the Palazzo Saibante with his wife, Grace Fletcher, an amateur painter, who studied in Paris in the 1870s and was influenced by the Impressionists, and her daughter, Ivy. Ivy, later to become a journalist at the Daily Express in the 1930s, was often a guinea pig for Horace's experiments, which she described in her unpublished memoirs "Remember Me".

Although many people believed Fletcher’s laboratory reports, the more important eye-opener to doctors and laymen was his series of experiments at Yale University. It was here that he participated, at the age of fifty-eight, in vigorous tests of strength and endurance versus the college athletes. The tests included: “deep-knee bending”, holding out arms horizontally for a length of time, and calf raises on an intricate machine. Fletcher claimed to lift “three hundred pounds dead weight three hundred and fifty times with his right calf”.[2] The tests claim that Fletcher outperformed these Yale athletes in all events and that they were very impressed with his athletic ability at his old age. Fletcher attributed this to following his eating practices, and ultimately these tests, whether true or not, helped further endorse “Fletcherism” publicly.[3]

Fletcher saw many similarities between humans and functioning machines. He posited several analogies between machines and the human body. Just some of the comparisons that Fletcher drew included: fuel to food; steam to blood circulation; steam gauge to human pulse; and engine to heart.[4]

Along with "Fletcherizing", Fletcher and his supporters advocated a low-protein diet as a means to health and well-being.

Fletcher had a special interest in human excreta. He believed that the only true indication of one’s nutrition was evidenced by excreta (Fletcher 142). Fletcher advocated teaching children to examine their excreta as a means for disease prevention (Fletcher 143). If one was in good health and maintained proper nutrition then their excreta, or digestive "ash", as Fletcher called it, should be entirely "inoffensive". By inoffensive, Fletcher meant that there was no stench and no evidence of bacterial decomposition.[5]

Fletcher was an avid spokesman for Belgian Relief and a member of the Commission for Relief in Belgium in World War I.

By 1919, when Fletcher, 69, died of bronchitis, his diet plan was already being replaced by the next approach to dieting championed by Irving Fisher and Eugene Lyman Fisk: counting calories.
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Type: Discussion • Score: 12 • Views: 1,049 • Replies: 58

 
georgeob1
 
  2  
Reply Wed 4 Jan, 2017 04:59 pm
@edgarblythe,
Thanks for that Edgar. I recall as a boy being told stuff about chewing my food that likely originated him. I also have vague recollections of hearing the verb fletcharize used.
farmerman
 
  2  
Reply Wed 4 Jan, 2017 05:03 pm
@georgeob1,
what do you do with apple sauce? How bout mashed potatoes? should I chew them 100 times?
georgeob1
 
  1  
Reply Wed 4 Jan, 2017 05:23 pm
@farmerman,
Well I never took the advice even then. I'm a stubborn coot, but probably not as bad as you in this respect.

I think the guy Edgar noted was indeed an influential voice a couple of generations ago, and I saw some of the residue of it.

Do you slurp your applesauce?
farmerman
 
  2  
Reply Wed 4 Jan, 2017 05:28 pm
@georgeob1,
heavens, what am I, a Marine?

I usually take my apple sauce with rotkhol (A red cabbage slaw that is very vinegary but not like saur kraut)
PORK and apple sauce mit rotkhol.
georgeob1
 
  1  
Reply Wed 4 Jan, 2017 05:30 pm
@farmerman,
You're a goddam geologist. That's why I asked.

Marines don't slurp.
0 Replies
 
edgarblythe
 
  2  
Reply Wed 4 Jan, 2017 05:40 pm
Fletcher said to chew even liquids at that rate, to mix the food good with saliva.

One person I read up on often suggests we should swallow food in chunks. It makes the stomach work, which is good for it, according to him.
georgeob1
 
  1  
Reply Wed 4 Jan, 2017 06:51 pm
@edgarblythe,
He sounds like a geologist. Probably Farmerman.
0 Replies
 
seac
 
  1  
Reply Thu 5 Jan, 2017 02:20 am
@edgarblythe,
Yeah, don't go swallowing corn without chewing.
0 Replies
 
saab
 
  1  
Reply Thu 5 Jan, 2017 03:59 am
Thanks, that was interesting to read.
100 times seems a bit too much for me. But eating slowly and chewing your food I think is important.
Often I watch people eating - either on TV or while waiting in a restaurant - many just chew 4-6 times and gulp down part and add more while still chewing.
0 Replies
 
nacredambition
 
  2  
Reply Thu 5 Jan, 2017 04:33 am
@edgarblythe,
To chew or to eschew, that is the question.
0 Replies
 
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Thu 5 Jan, 2017 06:38 am
One exception may be gum. 100 times might not be enough.
0 Replies
 
Roberta
 
  1  
Reply Thu 5 Jan, 2017 06:42 am
My mother was not usually crazed about my chewing until it came to corn. She stood over me and counted. I still love corn. But now I chew as many times as I want to.
0 Replies
 
izzythepush
 
  2  
Reply Thu 5 Jan, 2017 06:53 am
There is a story, perhaps apocryphal, that Queen Victoria would bolt down her food when dining with Gladstone. She particularly liked Disraeli, and had no time for Gladstone. Gladstone was one of those chew 100 times types so would spend a lot longer eating. Etiquette demanded that all plates were taken away once the monarch had finished, so Gladstone always went hungry.
edgarblythe
 
  3  
Reply Thu 5 Jan, 2017 07:03 am
@izzythepush,
Leonard Cohen – Queen Victoria Lyrics
Queen Victoria,
My father and all his tobacco loved you,
I love you too in all your forms,
The slim and lovely virgin floating among German beer,
The mean governess of the huge pink maps,
The solitary mourner of a prince.

Queen Victoria,
I am cold and rainy,
I am dirty as a glass roof in a train station,
I feel like an empty cast iron exhibition,
I want ornaments on everything,
Because my love, she gone with other boys.

Queen Victoria,
Do you have a punishment under the white lace,
Will you be short with her, will you make her read those little Bibles,
Will you spank her with a mechanical corset.
I want her pure as power, I want her skin slightly musty with petticoats
Will you wash the easy bidet out of her head?

Queen Victoria,
I'm not much nourished by modern love,
Will you come into my life
With your sorrow and your black carriages,
And your perfect
Memories.

Queen Victoria,
The Twentieth Century belongs to you and me.
Let us be two severe giants not less lonely for our partnership,
Who discolor test tubes in the halls of Science,
Who turn up unwelcome at every World's Fair,
Heavy with proverbs and corrections,
Confusing the star-dazed tourists
With our incomparable sense of loss.
0 Replies
 
ossobucotemp
 
  1  
Reply Thu 5 Jan, 2017 10:14 am
@izzythepush,
Good story, either way.
0 Replies
 
georgeob1
 
  2  
Reply Thu 5 Jan, 2017 10:27 am
Well I too eat too fast ( at least my wife & daughters scold me for that).

Two years ago just after Christmas I suddenly developed some chest pains and went to the local hospital emergency room to check it out. They did the usual checks and found heart & circulation OK, then took an x ray of my chest. Later the Doc.. came back saying there was a mass, possibly a clot in my right lung - a reather dark prospect indeed. I was admitted and the next morning got a broncoscope examination to check it out - the prospects at the time suggested that a clot in the lung was the optimistic expectation. During the exam the Doc blurted out "Well I'll be damned", asking the ORE nurce if she could see "it" too. Then they showed me on the screen - it was a kernel of corn lodged sideways in a bronchial tube that has collapsed the portion of my lung it served. They removed it handily and I was OK.

Now, under the watchful eye of my skeptical wife I chew my food a bit more than before.
Frugal1
 
  -4  
Reply Thu 5 Jan, 2017 10:42 am
That contradicts the advice Nancy Pelosi gave, she said swallow it whole and pass it to find out what's in it.

I think chewing well before swallowing is much healthier advice.
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Thu 5 Jan, 2017 10:49 am
@georgeob1,
You are supposed to eat around the cob.
0 Replies
 
roger
 
  2  
Reply Thu 5 Jan, 2017 01:40 pm
Maybe someone is over estimating the amount of calories involved in chewing.
0 Replies
 
 

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