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Looking for a specific term for a method commonly used in books and movies.

 
 
Reply Wed 23 Nov, 2016 10:24 am
This is the first question I post here, and I speak English as a second language, which I wanted to clarify in advance in case I am not clear or adequately expressed.

There is an element pretty popular in Literature and Cinema, but I am not quit able to describe it without making it sound like a description of Motifs.

What is the term for a situation, presented in a plot, that reoccurs in a slightly (or not slightly) different form or setting?

For instance:
In the film "Mystic River" one of the characters, when a child, was dragged into a car with two men. When he* was in the car, the man in the front passenger seat turned his face back to him and smiled. This happened again when the kid grew old. He was invited to join two men he knew in their car. Seated in the back, the man in the front passenger seat turned his face to him and smiled. It is, in particular, a foreshadowing, since the viewer knows how the last time turned out, but foreshadowing is very general, and this is a specific method.

What should we call objects, gestures, face expressions and more, that intendedly show up more than once, again, differently, slightly or not?

For instance: In "The Wizard of Oz (1939)", some inspector wishes to take Dorothy's dog away in a basket and they both fight over it. In the land of oz, later, there is a fight between Dorothy and the Wicked Witch (which happened to be portrayed by the same person who played the inspector) and the basket, in a different form I believe, is in the scene as well, pulled by the two of them in a similar fashion.

I can't say for sure that the two instance immediately fall into the same category but I can't bring myself to telling why. Also, where is the line between what I described and a Motif?

Thank you in advance.
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Type: Question • Score: 2 • Views: 755 • Replies: 3

 
jespah
 
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Reply Wed 23 Nov, 2016 11:19 am
@djmeitar,
It's foreshadowing.
layman
 
  2  
Reply Wed 23 Nov, 2016 11:29 am
@jespah,
jespah wrote:

It's foreshadowing.


Yeah, as the OP said himself: "It is, in particular, a foreshadowing, since the viewer knows how the last time turned out, but foreshadowing is very general, and this is a specific method."

I guess he's looking for a particular subset of foreshadowing, such as "foreshadowing via deja vu."
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cicerone imposter
 
  1  
Reply Wed 23 Nov, 2016 09:19 pm
@jespah,
Here's a good explanation for the use of the word "foreshadowing."
http://literarydevices.net/foreshadowing/
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