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Donald Trump

 
 
Randy71
 
Reply Fri 19 Aug, 2016 06:55 am
Many people have bad things to say about Donald Trump but I have something good to say. Trump says if he wins, he can bring prayer back in schools. Children should pray in schools. If they're taught to pray, they might grow up to be Christians and if they carry God in their hearts, it will make them better citizens and better leaders.

So many of today's people are non-religious. They believe that God is fictional and they and many other people don't take their children to churches or go to churches themselves. If children aren't taught anything about God, they'll grow up to believe that he is fictional as well. I'm worried that religion may eventually become a thing of the past. But if children are taught to pray, they may grow to worship God and if they do, God will bless them.

I have nine words for every Hillary supporter who says that Trump lied. HILLARY LIES TO PEOPLE AND IT HAS BEEN PROVEN. It's unfair of people to point out Trump's lies and ignore Hillary's lies. I can't be 100% sure if Trump is being honest about getting prayer brought back to schools. I can't be 100% positive that it's not a lie but I'm willing to give him the benefit of the doubt. I'm also willing to admit that Trump has some big flaws but so does Hillary. I'm against Hillary and I was also against Trump. But when he said that he can get prayer brought back to schools, I decided to give him a chance because prayer and religion are important to me.
 
jespah
 
  5  
Reply Fri 19 Aug, 2016 07:09 am
@Randy71,
That's nice.

Lots of us are American citizens and we aren't Christians. Are you saying we're not allowed to go to public school? Or are we suddenly no longer Americans? Because I was born here. My parents were born here. My grandparents were born here.

Oh, and have you ever bothered to, you know, actually read the Constitution? Here, I'll provide you with a handy link: http://www.archives.gov/exhibits/charters/constitution_transcript.html

Protip: look at the Bill of Rights.
0 Replies
 
rosborne979
 
  1  
Reply Fri 19 Aug, 2016 01:19 pm
@Randy71,
Where and when did you go to school?
0 Replies
 
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Fri 19 Aug, 2016 02:41 pm
Interesting.

He says he voted for Mr. Sanders.

http://able2know.org/topic/315310-1#post-6152974


Odd thing to do as Mr. Sanders is pretty clearly not a Christian.
0 Replies
 
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Fri 19 Aug, 2016 02:42 pm
@Randy71,
Did you become a Christian very recently?
0 Replies
 
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Sat 20 Aug, 2016 05:11 am
@Randy71,
Before you become all starry eyed about Mr Trump's promise to "restore prayer in our public schools" You should know that this IS a lie, because the removal of prayer from public schools is a matter of hiistory in which the US SUpreme Court had ruled waaaay back in 1963. Heres a pretty good summary from Wikipedia regarding the early 20th century and the landmark decsion of Engle v Vitale and another in Baltimore Md.

Im surprised that we still have people who fall for bullshit from these demagogues who feed you crap knowing that youll buyit.


Quote:
In the United States, public schools are banned from conducting religious observances such as prayer. The legal basis for this prohibition is the First Amendment to the United States Constitution, which requires that


The first part of the amendment ("Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion") is known as the Establishment Clause of the First Amendment, while the second part ("or prohibiting the free exercise thereof") is known as the Free Exercise Clause.
Though each of these clauses originally applied only to the central US government, the Fourteenth Amendment extended the scope of the entire First Amendment to all levels of government, including the state level,[1] thus compelling states and their subject schools to adopt an equally detached approach to religion in schools.

School prayer prior to 1962[edit]

In the 18th, 19th and early 20th centuries, it was common practice for public schools to open with an oral prayer or Bible reading.[2][not in citation given] Catholics would sometimes object to the distinct Protestant observations performed in the local schools. For instance, in the Edgerton Bible Case (Weiss v. District Board (1890)), the Wisconsin Supreme Court ruled in favor of Catholics who objected to the use of the King James Bible in Wisconsin public schools. This ruling was based on the state constitution and only applied in Wisconsin.

A Turning Point: The "Regents' Prayer" and Engel v. Vitale[edit]

The media and popular culture often erroneously credit atheist Madalyn Murray O'Hair with removing school prayer from US public schools, when the case against recitation of the Lord's Prayer in Baltimore schools was decided by the Supreme Court in 1963. A more significant case had reached the Supreme Court one year prior, suddenly changing the legal climate for school prayer in the US.[3]
In 1955, the New York Board of Regents developed a prayer recommended (but not required) for the school districts under its purview. The prayer was relatively short: "Almighty God, we acknowledge our dependence on Thee, and we beg Thy blessings upon us, our parents, our teachers, and our country."[1][4] The board stated that the prayer would "combat juvenile delinquency and counter the spread of Communism."[4]
Seven years later, Steven I. Engel, a Jew, was upset to see his son’s hands clasped and his head bent in prayer. He told his son that this was “not the way we say prayers.” Engel, a founding member of the New York Civil Liberties Union, would bring action along with Daniel Lichtenstein, Monroe Lerner, Lenore Lyons, and Lawrence Roth, all parents of children in the Long Island, New York public school system, against Union Free School District No. 9 for its adoption and subsequent prescription of the so-called "Regent's prayer", arguing that it constituted the state-sponsored establishment of religion in violation of citizens’ First Amendment rights via the Fourteenth Amendment.[5]
Use of the Regent's prayer would be initially upheld in both New York State Court and in the New York Court of Appeals, prompting Engels to petition the US Supreme Court in the Engel v. Vitale case in 1962. With its 8–1 vote to make public recitation of the Regents' Prayer in public schools unlawful, the U.S. Supreme Court made its first-ever decision on coercive prayer in public schools. It made its second in 1963—the Abington School District v. Schempp ruling, which made the corporate reading of the Bible and recitation of the Lord's Prayer unlawful in public schools.[3]

1963 and after[edit]

In these two landmark decisions, Engel v. Vitale (1962) and Abington School District v. Schempp (1963), the Supreme Court established what is now the current prohibition on state-sponsored prayer in US schools. While the Engel decision held that the promulgation of an official state-school prayer stood in violation of the First Amendment’s Establishment Clause (thus overruling the New York Courts’ decisions), Abington held that Bible readings and other public school-sponsored religious activities were prohibited.[6] Madalyn Murray's lawsuit, Murray v. Curlett, contributed to the removal of compulsory Bible reading from the public schools of the United States, and has had lasting and significant effects.
0 Replies
 
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Sat 20 Aug, 2016 05:24 am
@Randy71,
So you see, the restoration of stuff like The Lord's prayer, or even the non-denominational "Regent;s Prayer" will require the US to modify the Constitution in a manner that, I believe, would not be acceptable to the states. You should do more reading about how our government actually works
























0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Sat 20 Aug, 2016 06:29 am
The separation of church and state is a very old tradition in the United States, as well. Jefferson wrote his "wall of separation" letter to the Baptists in Danbury, Connecticut in 1802. Andrew Jackson, a devout Presbyterian, refused to call for a national day of fasting and thanksgiving in 1832 (after a cholera epidemic) citing the separation of church and state. In case the point escapes you, Christians such as the Baptists in Danbury and President Jackson supported the idea of the separation of church and state. Allowing religion into public life is the thin edge of the wedge which would divide Americans into the allegedly righteous and the allegedly heretical. It's the ultimate slippery slope.
0 Replies
 
izzythepush
 
  1  
Reply Sat 20 Aug, 2016 06:45 am
You can have assemblies like this.


0 Replies
 
Finn dAbuzz
 
  1  
Reply Sat 20 Aug, 2016 04:26 pm
@Randy71,
If you would like your children to be taught to pray you should enroll them in parochial school, or better yet, teach them yourself.

There is no way Trump is going to bring prayer back to school in the sense that every kid will be expected to pray, nor should he even try.

If a kid wants to pray in school, how can anyone stop him or her?
0 Replies
 
jcboy
 
  3  
Reply Tue 7 Mar, 2017 08:03 pm
I don't "hate" prayer, I just wish our legislators would find better use of their precious time in office.
roger
 
  1  
Reply Tue 7 Mar, 2017 08:12 pm
@jcboy,
Yeah! Like raising campaign funds and working for re-election.
0 Replies
 
 

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