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The Pinecone - The history of a religious nut

 
 
Reply Mon 18 Jul, 2016 07:35 pm
my studies often take me on many strange adventures, so I thought Id share one of my recent binges. So, pinecones may seem a strange choice for religious affiliation, but turns out a very common one, here are a few examples. This picture shows the Pope whose staff has a small pinecone inculcated into it's decor
http://www.mindserpent.com/American_History/religion/pope/bg/pope_pine_cone_staff.jpg
This mexican God holds pinecones in his hand
http://www.mindserpent.com/American_History/religion/pope/bg/mex_god_pinecones_fir.jpg
Hindu Gods are also in on the act
http://www.mindserpent.com/American_History/religion/pope/bg/hindu_pinecone.jpg
This is the staff of the Egyptian god Osiris, oh look! more pinecones!
http://www.mindserpent.com/American_History/religion/pope/bg/osiris_pine_cone_staff.jpg
Here is an Assyrian Winged God, thought to be linked back to the Babylonian god Tammuz, who also appears to be partial to a pinecone or two
http://www.mindserpent.com/American_History/religion/pope/bg/assyrian_god_pinecone.jpg
onto Rome, where Bacchus the Greco-Roman god of drunkenesss and revelry also appears to wield the pinecone staff
http://www.mindserpent.com/American_History/religion/pope/bg/bacchus2.jpg
and Dionysus, the Greek Counterpart to Bacchus, seems to have put on a few pounds
http://www.mindserpent.com/American_History/religion/pope/bg/dionysus.jpg
and of course the largest known pine cone resides in the court of the pine cone in the Vatican.
http://www.mindserpent.com/American_History/religion/pope/bg/ct_pinecone_vatican.jpg

So through history the pinecone is a common thread through a number of major religions, It interests me as to the origin, the first guy who thought, "you know what, my god likes pinecones, I am going to collect pinecones."





 
AugustineBrother
 
  -4  
Reply Tue 19 Jul, 2016 06:13 am
@Smileyrius,
You have the data but your hypothesis is Blah !!

The Israelites used pomegranates in much the same way but we happen to know that -- just like their names, eg Deborah-- they sometimes picked solely by aesthetic consideration.

Now if you are unconvinced you might take the big example (at least I've always thought so0 The Song of Songs, with all its flora and fauna, and notice how to make the same poetic point the objects stay the same in a different culture eg Greek Septuagint, even though now the meaning has changed almost totally.

0 Replies
 
izzythepush
 
  4  
Reply Tue 19 Jul, 2016 06:18 am
@Smileyrius,
Sorry the first reply to your well thought out thread is from a total muppet. I think it's interesting like I think that the Mayan priests being converted to Christianity saw all sorts of similarities between their old religion and the new one.

Unfortunately there are lots of idiots who don't like anything that conflicts with their long held prejudices.
0 Replies
 
rosborne979
 
  3  
Reply Tue 19 Jul, 2016 08:39 am
@Smileyrius,
This is all news to me. I never noticed it before. But a quick google seems to indicate that Pine Cones have been a big part of both religion and culture for a very long time. But I can't say as I really understand why.

https://thirdeyepinecones.com/history-symbolism
Walter Hinteler
 
  2  
Reply Tue 19 Jul, 2016 10:16 am
@rosborne979,
The Pine Cone statue that now resides in the Court of the Pine Cone (Cortile della Pigna) in the Vatican, in the 1st century AD. (The piece was originally a fountain that resided in the Temple of Isis in Campo Martius next to the Pantheon.)

In (early) Christianity, the pinecone is meant to be a symbolic fountain of life - just like in the original Egyptian version, a symbol of spiritual illumination. (The pine cone staff is a symbol of Osiris.)
0 Replies
 
mark noble
 
  1  
Reply Tue 19 Jul, 2016 11:52 am
@Smileyrius,
Pineal representations.
Icon-worship, nonetheless.
Typical catholic grandure.
Walter Hinteler
 
  2  
Reply Tue 19 Jul, 2016 12:27 pm
@mark noble,
mark noble wrote:
Icon-worship, nonetheless.
Typical catholic grandure.
That's the reason, why there aren't, for instance, not only beheaded and faceless figures in the walls of the Lady Chapel, Ely Cathedral, but symbols were hammered away as well. (ISIS militants are doing similar today.)
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Tue 19 Jul, 2016 12:36 pm
@rosborne979,
The Creationist movement is a fan of the lodgepole pine and its fire-activated cone.
ossobucotemp
 
  1  
Reply Tue 19 Jul, 2016 12:47 pm
@ehBeth,
lodgepole pine! I remember those words from my landarch designing days.
0 Replies
 
rosborne979
 
  1  
Reply Tue 19 Jul, 2016 02:24 pm
@ehBeth,
ehBeth wrote:
The Creationist movement is a fan of the lodgepole pine and its fire-activated cone.

Really? What's the story behind that? I bet it's a good one.
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Tue 19 Jul, 2016 02:32 pm
@rosborne979,
from a creationist site (not posting the link)

Quote:
If these plants were products of evolution, how did they evolve the reliance on fire and smoke in order to survive? If it seems hard to believe, that’s because it doesn’t make sense scientifically. The only way plants could have a reliance on fire was for God to have designed them that way from the very beginning. That also means that soon after the Fall (when Adam sinned and was expelled from the Garden of Eden), that forest and prairie fires must have occurred periodically, most likely due to storms and lightning.
rosborne979
 
  1  
Reply Tue 19 Jul, 2016 03:49 pm
@ehBeth,
Yup, I was right. That was quite a load. Smile Thanks.
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Wed 20 Jul, 2016 03:26 am
@rosborne979,
(just getting the updates)
Read y your Harun Yaya, whose lavishly illustrated book is about "creation" biology. His logic is mostly non-existent. Its a hoot.
0 Replies
 
mark noble
 
  1  
Reply Wed 20 Jul, 2016 03:52 am
@Walter Hinteler,
I agree.
0 Replies
 
 

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