9
   

A strange controversy in Korea

 
 
Blickers
 
  1  
Reply Fri 22 Jul, 2016 06:35 am
@saab,
Quate saab:
Quote:
The northern Europeans emigrated to northern US or Canada where the earth were good and it would be easy to start farming. Often Catholics and Protestants in different areas.

Technically, it would be even easier to start farming in the South with the longer growing season. I'm thinking in the late 1800s there was some kind of land grant deal or something in the Western territories and farmland was extremely cheap in many of the areas they settled in. I'm sure that where the first northern Europeans got their farms had a lot to do with which states subsequent northern Europeans chose to go to, especially since the history of America is first a few of each group come over, then their brothers and family comes over, then their cousins, then their friends they grew up with, and then the word spread to other countrymen about the opportunity to come.

One thing-the Germans and Dutch specifically came to America throughout even the colonial period, in fact the first name of New York was New Amsterdam.
saab
 
  1  
Reply Fri 22 Jul, 2016 09:09 am
@Blickers,
Yes, emigrants did get lots to plow.
Going from northern Europe to northern USA or Canada was shorter than to continue to the south. When on land even south was further away than mid west.
0 Replies
 
cicerone imposter
 
  1  
Reply Fri 22 Jul, 2016 11:14 am
@Blickers,
Quote:
I don't believe that a majority of Americans were of German descent, but German descent is the largest single ethnic group in the USA.


It's the same with the state of Hawaii. Japanese are the largest ethnic group, but I think it's around 30%.
0 Replies
 
ossobucotemp
 
  1  
Reply Fri 22 Jul, 2016 11:16 am
@saab,
Thanks, saab.
0 Replies
 
Foofie
 
  0  
Reply Fri 22 Jul, 2016 12:45 pm
@ossobucotemp,
Yes; to the midwest predominantly, even though there are German communities in the Southwest. The midwest Germans are either Catholic or Lutheran, as ancestors in Germany, I believe. In the Southwest there might be more that assimilated into Protestant denominations, such as Methodist, for example.
Foofie
 
  0  
Reply Fri 22 Jul, 2016 12:53 pm
@ossobucotemp,
ossobucotemp wrote:

I recently saw a photo of German soldiers being shown photos or films of the camps and they were pretty much to a man visibly distressed by what they saw.
Generalizing about people of a country is dumb.


Who's generalizing? You seem to be making a conclusion from a photo that might have been staged. Remember who lost the war.

I am not demonizing Germans. However, I do think they became true believers to the Nazi propaganda more often than we Americans might be able to believe. And, German-Americans value their German heritage from the standpoint of being a valued ethnicity in America for traits of industriousness and hard work. No one is implying there is a tendency to any unAmerican feelings amongst German-Americans.

And, I do generalize that most Jewish Americans get educated to some level beyond high school. That's a generalization? Or, a statistic?
Walter Hinteler
 
  2  
Reply Fri 22 Jul, 2016 12:58 pm
@Foofie,
Foofie wrote:
The midwest Germans are either Catholic or Lutheran, as ancestors in Germany, I believe. In the Southwest there might be more that assimilated into Protestant denominations, such as Methodist, for example.
There weren't Methodists in any German country before 1850, then a few Protestants were evangelised from Britain.

0 Replies
 
ossobucotemp
 
  4  
Reply Fri 22 Jul, 2016 01:37 pm
@Foofie,
http://www.slate.com/blogs/the_vault/2013/06/11/photo_german_soldiers_react_to_concentration_camp_footage.html

I think this is the link I read.
Foofie
 
  0  
Reply Sun 24 Jul, 2016 11:58 am
@ossobucotemp,


I am not reading links. I've read many books on the subject, and more than one book quoted less affluent Germans as having great resentment to the success of German Jews in the 1930's. It's really not important whether Germans then or now have any feelings about the Holocaust. Let's just say that whatever country the Germans occupied they had a lot of volunteers to say where Jews were. The only outliers were in Denmark, Holland, and some Huegenots in the French mountains.

I think I've said all I can say on the subject.
momoends
 
  1  
Reply Sun 24 Jul, 2016 01:30 pm
@cicerone imposter,
i thought it was more about a dangerous criminal organization members being hosted willingly by the most luxury hotels and their managers when the government (known to be linked somehow to the yakuza) had committed to get rid of the yakuza domination and menace in collaboration with Japanese Authorities....
I donĀ“t think is about race-ethnic conflict
momoends
 
  1  
Reply Sun 24 Jul, 2016 01:32 pm
@saab,
??????!!!!!!!
0 Replies
 
ossobucotemp
 
  1  
Reply Sun 24 Jul, 2016 01:35 pm
@momoends,
No, he had misspelled yukata; they are japanese style robes. It wasn't about Yakusa.

http://able2know.org/topic/332109-1#post-6222628
saab
 
  1  
Reply Sun 24 Jul, 2016 02:18 pm
@Foofie,
There were also Danes who did tell the Germans where to find Jews. You could not trust everybody.
The majority got out of Denmark about at the same time and came to Sweden.
On October 1, 1943, Nazi leader Adolf Hitler ordered Danish Jews to be arrested and deported. Despite great personal risk, the Danish resistance movement, with the assistance of many ordinary Danish citizens, managed to evacuate 7,220 of Denmark's 7,800 Jews, plus 686 non-Jewish spouses, by sea to nearby neutral Sweden.
It was not only less affluent Germans who were against Jews - it was common in all of Europe and for centuries.
cicerone imposter
 
  1  
Reply Sun 24 Jul, 2016 03:45 pm
@saab,
If my memory serves, didn't a large group of Jews go the England?
saab
 
  2  
Reply Sun 24 Jul, 2016 11:53 pm
@cicerone imposter,

There were the Childrens Transport from Germany . Austria and Tcheckoslovakai to safe children. This was organized by Jewish Organisation. Exact how many children is not known but between 17 500 to 20 500 under 16 years. Abaout 10 000 went to England. Often privat persons where the children stayed paid for the costs.
0 Replies
 
momoends
 
  2  
Reply Mon 25 Jul, 2016 12:19 am
@ossobucotemp,
hahahahahahahhahah really??!!! hahahahah i made a fool of myself!! hahahahaha
Im sorry and thanks a lot
0 Replies
 
Foofie
 
  1  
Reply Mon 25 Jul, 2016 12:17 pm
@saab,
saab wrote:

It was not only less affluent Germans who were against Jews - it was common in all of Europe and for centuries.


So you seem to like intellectual honesty.
saab
 
  2  
Reply Mon 25 Jul, 2016 12:59 pm
@Foofie,
What does that mean?
Foofie
 
  1  
Reply Tue 26 Jul, 2016 12:47 pm
@saab,
saab wrote:

What does that mean?


You don't try to sugar coat history, in this context. You tell the truth no matter whether it might be offensive to some people.
saab
 
  1  
Reply Tue 26 Jul, 2016 01:35 pm
@Foofie,
So you mean I should not mention that there were racists or racism existed during WWII because one of the racists could get hurt?
It was never a secret in Denmark on what side people were on.
There were people who did not like Jews but hated the Nazis and helped getting the Jews to escape.
Between 5% to 10% sided with the Germans.
0 Replies
 
 

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