9
   

A strange controversy in Korea

 
 
Foofie
 
  0  
Reply Tue 19 Jul, 2016 02:45 pm
@cicerone imposter,
When peoples moved from one geographical location to another, cultures changed. They have new economies, political institutions, cuisines, etc. The emphasis on DNA is only valid for medical science to understand why some people don't or do get certain illnesses. Please peddle your beliefs elsewhere.
Blickers
 
  3  
Reply Tue 19 Jul, 2016 09:30 pm
@Foofie,
You're wrong. Whenever a group of people settle down in one place, their DNA develops harmless mutations called "genetic markers" which all their descendants will carry. This is how we can trace various groups back to when they left Africa. Due to which genetic markers your DNA has, scientists can tell if any of your ancestors ever came from a certain place or not. This video will show how the process works.

cicerone imposter
 
  1  
Reply Tue 19 Jul, 2016 10:41 pm
@Blickers,
It seems some people can never understand concepts that can be learned very easily.
Quote:
Genetics | Define Genetics at Dictionary.com
www.dictionary.com/browse/genetics
genetics definition. The study of heredity, or how the characteristics of living things are transmitted from one generation to the next. Every living thing contains the genetic material that makes up DNA molecules. This material is passed on when organisms reproduce. The basic unit of heredity is the gene.
0 Replies
 
saab
 
  1  
Reply Wed 20 Jul, 2016 04:13 am
@cicerone imposter,
Quote:
Do You Have Rh Negative Blood? New Theory Suggests Your DNA Doesn’t Come From Earth
An interesting new theory suggests if you have an RH negative blood type, you may have a kind of “alien DNA”. Studies show that Rh negative blood types do not carry the gene originating from the rhesus monkey, the supposed animal humans evolved from.

http://thespiritscience.net/2016/06/15/do-you-have-rh-negative-blood-new-theory-suggests-your-dna-doesnt-come-from-earth/

Cicerone
I certainly do not believe everything regarding DNA. Then I would be some sort of an alien from outer space...
I know what I am, what I look like, how I think and my cultural background.
I am in no way an alien.
My feeling where my roots are is much more important than if my DNA says my ancesters 50.000 years ago came from Asia or Africa.

saab
 
  1  
Reply Wed 20 Jul, 2016 11:12 am
@saab,
Also scientists - some- think that DNA can be changed by sports, nutrician and if you have gone through some really terrible years - like a concentration camp.
Some less scientific idea is that you yourself can change your DNA by thoughts and mindfulness.
cicerone imposter
 
  2  
Reply Wed 20 Jul, 2016 12:16 pm
@saab,
Quote:
My feeling where my roots are is much more important than if my DNA says my ancesters 50.000 years ago came from Asia or Africa.


That's true for most of us, but I still find it fascinating where my root-roots are. Learning that Japanese ancestry came from Korea was interesting to learn.

We just have to accept our roots; we have no choice in the matter. That we are what we are based on all of our previous ancestors makes for an interesting background. I found out several decades ago that my grand-grand father was samurai. I wrote to the Hiroshima government offices to get the information, but they're only able to go back three generations.

It was written in Chinese calligraphy which most Japanese are unable to translate, but my brother knew a Japanese professor from Japan who was able to translate over 95% into English. I shared the information with my other family members and my cousins in Hawaii.
saab
 
  1  
Reply Wed 20 Jul, 2016 12:45 pm
@cicerone imposter,
It is interesting to trace the ancestors. I have had lots of fun doing something.
The familytree had already been done, but I enjoyed to find information about the family, collecting all the little items which not always was the best thing to find.
An aunt has told us cousins about her wonderful wedding held in a lovely church with a dinner afterwards in a castle. I found the papers and the invitations. It was a small wedding at her parents-in laws home and the wedding was at the town hall.
I also found out a couple have been authors and there I got many interesting information about their life.
Foofie
 
  1  
Reply Wed 20 Jul, 2016 01:49 pm
@Blickers,
So by knowing where one's ancestors came from does not mean people are INHERENTLY the same by virtue of DNA. Englishman are not like WASPs from the south or New England, in the U.S.A. Cultures change us. Also their is the workings of epigenetics. Look it up on Wikipedia.
Foofie
 
  2  
Reply Wed 20 Jul, 2016 01:50 pm
@saab,
Yes. It is called epigenetics. See Wikipedia.
0 Replies
 
cicerone imposter
 
  2  
Reply Wed 20 Jul, 2016 02:19 pm
@saab,
On my wife's side of the family, her great grandfather was some sort of a general. When we visited Himeji Castle in Japan, their family crest is there on a plaque. My wife wants to take our son to Japan to show him the plaque.
When I was in the USAF, I made E4 (in 18 months). Our son was also in the USAF and made Major.
0 Replies
 
Blickers
 
  1  
Reply Wed 20 Jul, 2016 09:18 pm
@Foofie,
Quote Foofie:
Quote:
So by knowing where one's ancestors came from does not mean people are INHERENTLY the same by virtue of DNA. Englishman are not like WASPs from the south or New England, in the U.S.A. Cultures change us.

If all their ancestors are from England, they are the same. Something not likely to happen in America unless their Atlantic crossing was in the last few generations, as the largest ancestry over here is German. In addition, down South 10% of the self-described WASPs have at least 1% African American ancestry.

As for epigenetics, that doesn't affect heritability in the opinion of most scientists.

Quote:
the use of the term epigenetic to describe processes that are heritable is controversial.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Epigenetics
saab
 
  1  
Reply Thu 21 Jul, 2016 02:11 am
Just a few decades ago it was common to say something was inherited from whatever relative.
Then it changed and it was really bad to say inheritaded. How you developed depended on the enviroment.
Now it is again inherited = DNA.
Wait a few years and I am sure it is not only DNA which is the most important
there will be other things which influence our lifes and how we are and what we get or not get.
Blickers
 
  1  
Reply Thu 21 Jul, 2016 06:16 am
@saab,
There is absolutely no question culture influences our life much more than DNA. The child of a couple born in, say, Canada, of German immigrant parents will have a life much more like his fellow Canadian whose parents came from Italy or Korea than he will with the people of Germany. However, genetically he will still be like he was if his parents stayed in Germany.

The trick, however, in a diverse country like Canada, is to find someone of pure German descent to marry, (assuming the German Canadian child cares about such things). Since immigrants from different countries tend to "adopt" certain neighborhoods in cities when they come, that might even happen for the first generation. The German-Canadian guy marries the girl next door who is also of German descent. However, who their kids will marry is quite possibly not to be of pure German descent. When the immigrant moves to a new country, the bloodline, so to speak, doesn't stay pure for too many generations. And even if the third generation marries someone of similar ancestry, (the immigrant is the first generation, the kids born in the new country are the second generation, their kids are the third generation, etc), the chances of the fourth generation marrying someone of pure German descent is pretty low.

DNA doesn't determine their behavior, not by a long shot. But it does determine their inherited traits.
saab
 
  2  
Reply Thu 21 Jul, 2016 07:39 am
@Blickers,
I know an American family, where the first generation emmigrated to USA
their daughter married a Norwegian immigrant, their daughter married
a Norwegian immigrant and their son a woman of pure Norwegian decendent.
That is unusual
Blickers
 
  2  
Reply Thu 21 Jul, 2016 08:02 am
@saab,
That is a little unusual. My guess is that they lived in a neighborhood in a city that has a strong Scandinavian immigrant history and the kids stayed in the neighborhood-if the city is large enough there are sufficient opportunities for the kids to stay, (otherwise they can end up living in states 1,000 miles away or more). We have a city similar to that in my area that is strongly Polish with a scattering of Baltic.

I went with a friend who was getting treated for diabetes at the hospital there, and when we walked in you could see there was something a bit different about the people. Eastern European people do have a slightly different look to them than most white Americans, and when we were in the cafeteria after his appointment, I was waiting for him to say something about the cafeteria workers who were all speaking what sounded like Polish. My friend was African-American originally from Virginia, where when he was growing up most of the white people were of English or Irish descent with a little German thrown in. After a few minutes of eating lunch, he hears one cafeteria worker say something fairly loud to the other in Polish, and he finally exclaimed earnestly, "Goddamn, Blickers, this town is full of the strangest looking white people I've ever seen!"

So there are a few neighborhoods and even cities that remain magnets for immigrants of certain backgrounds, the churches are oriented toward them, etc. It can go on for generations like that. I don't know if that was the situation with your friend's family, but if I had to bet, I would bet that was the way the American branch of his family remained of Norwegian stock.
saab
 
  2  
Reply Thu 21 Jul, 2016 09:06 am
@Blickers,
Yes, they were from Minnesota and Wisconsin and met at Luther College or Luther Seminary, church gatherings and also St. Olaf, Northfield.
cicerone imposter
 
  2  
Reply Thu 21 Jul, 2016 10:17 am
@saab,
So true. My wife's niece married a Chinese. They adopted a child in China, and she has been exposed to both Chinese and Japanese culture - especially about food. She knows the names of Japanese food better than I, and when we go for dim sum, she can order like a pro.
0 Replies
 
ehBeth
 
  3  
Reply Thu 21 Jul, 2016 10:20 am
@Blickers,
Interesting example you picked. One thing German immigrants were noted for, in Canada, was not moving into neighbourhoods together ( a friend of my parents studied this from the 1950's through the 1980's). Germans in Canada (particularly after the second world war) didn't stick together. Funny bunch.

As much as my mother would have liked me to marry a nice accordion-playing Heinz or Werner, they weren't easy to find. She found one, but I managed to dodge him.
0 Replies
 
ehBeth
 
  2  
Reply Thu 21 Jul, 2016 10:21 am
@saab,
There's a section of the midwest that is very strongly Norwegian. In Canada, the Finns pretty much settled in two cities and you can find generations of people who are straight Finn.
saab
 
  1  
Reply Thu 21 Jul, 2016 10:43 am
@ehBeth,
The Swedes, the Norwegians and all the others often settled in certain areas where there were countrymen - it was normal and natural. There were friends, relatives, their language and culture. It is the same with emmigrants today.
They often settled in the same area in cities and we call it ghettos now adays.
The early settlers were farmers, so that is something else.

That German did not seek one anothers company after WWII could that have to do with WWII? Whom did the other side with?
 

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