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New Tarzan Trailer

 
 
Reply Wed 29 Jun, 2016 11:17 am
I had vowed never to watch Tarzan again, after reading racist quotes of the creator of the character, but Morgan Freeman on TV this morning stirred my curiosity. This trailer has me wanting to watch
 
engineer
 
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Reply Wed 29 Jun, 2016 11:27 am
@edgarblythe,
The original Tarzan novels are extremely racist and amazingly ignorant about Apes in particular and Africa in general. Burroughs was very much a product of his time and in the books, the success of Tarzan was directly tied to his white, upper crust, British birth. Jane was a prize to be claimed by the Alpha male, dainty and delicate and unable to resist the uber manliness of Tarzan.

That said, don't throw out the baby with the bath. The Disney animated version did a very good job of keeping the strengths of the original story while correcting all the glaring errors of the books. It will be interesting to see how this movie plays out. The book is still worth a read. It's a good tale and provides an interesting insight into how Africa was viewed by Western society in the late 1800's. You can read it here for free.
edgarblythe
 
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Reply Wed 29 Jun, 2016 12:10 pm
@engineer,
I rated the Disney Tarzan better than average.
Morgan Freeman says there is a bit of true history intermingled in this new one. He says that is why he agreed to be a part of it.
farmerman
 
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Reply Wed 29 Jun, 2016 12:37 pm
@edgarblythe,
weoften have to separate the artits from their works. I love HP LOvecraft, but he was a scary dude. My favorite painter is Carravagio but he was an actual murderer.

I think the concept of someone "being of their time" must be considered when we get all judgemental and state that "he shoulda known better"

Maybe he didnt.

Cahrles Dickens, was a wife beater, I guess Id have to agree that he shoulda known (unless he was a Suni).

0 Replies
 
tsarstepan
 
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Reply Wed 29 Jun, 2016 12:48 pm
@edgarblythe,
I'm never been a fan of the character (scandal or not).
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edgarblythe
 
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Reply Wed 29 Jun, 2016 01:32 pm
Well, the past is what it is and I have to agree that we can appreciate the good parts and try to learn from the bad parts.
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freyaferguson
 
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Reply Wed 17 Aug, 2016 04:55 am
@edgarblythe,
New Tarzan Trailer? Interesting stuff, I think...
Setanta
 
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Reply Wed 17 Aug, 2016 05:48 am
I see I'm very late to this party. Burroughs was more than just casually racist. His character John Carter in the "Barsoom" novels about Mars was a veteran of the Confederate States Army. Burroughs first wrote the Barsoom stories in 1910-11, but they didn't get big publicity until Tarzan became a success. Captain Carter exemplified the manners and culture of the antebellum South, and, given the times, which were aggressively racist (the modern Klu Klux Klan was "re-founded" in Georgia after a Jewish factory owner was lynched in Atlanta) was just the sort of hero the "Lily Whites" would love. The Clansman was the second novel in a trilogy romanticizing the Ku Klux Klan in the reconstruction period, published in 1905. Griffith adapted it for film ten years later, in The Birth of a Nation. The modern Klan was founded by a defrocked preacher, influenced by the lynching of Leo Frank, and Griffith's film. He quickly adopted Griffith's grandiose imagry:

http://www.slate.com/content/dam/slate/articles/arts/history/2015/03/birth_of_a_nation/150313_BirthNation_poster.jpg.CROP.original-original.jpg

If you look closely at that movie poster, it is from six years after the release of the picture, and it is for a showing in New York.

I don't excuse people as products of their time. The Urban League was founded in 1910 in New York, so it's not as though people were unaware of institutional racism and the opposition to it. Burroughs was a product on a conscientiously racist segment of soceity, and he wasn't that good of an author, either. I have never cared for excusing "artists" for their enormities based on their alleged artistic merit--and in the case of Burrough's, there is precious little merit to excuse his blatant racism.
edgarblythe
 
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Reply Wed 17 Aug, 2016 06:17 am
@Setanta,
I was not aware of most of this information. It has put me back in the anti Burroughs camp.
=================================
edit
No. That's practically a lie that I just wrote. I knew he was a racist SOB, but allowed myself to be persuaded to overlook it.
0 Replies
 
farmerman
 
  3  
Reply Wed 17 Aug, 2016 12:35 pm
@Setanta,
Looks like you were cuttin nd pastin there. Thomas Dixon, not ER Burroughs wrote the clansman. BTW, as an example Dixon was kinda pissed at the Revival II of the Klan because he felt that Jews and Catholics were all good hard qorking folks, AND JESUS mom was a JEW.

I pnly read one of the BArsoom books and it was one of those that was adpated from a pulp fiction serial that was written by Burroughs. The connection between "The Birth of a NAtion" and the white, green, yellow, and blck repilian /humans of the fying Mars kinda lost me there.

....

I dont really care much for outer space or planetary sci-fi. and I dont care for much of Burroughs writing. Even though Ray Bradbury stated that the Martian Chroniles was, in a way, an homage to the pulp fiction writing of Burroughs.
edgarblythe
 
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Reply Wed 17 Aug, 2016 12:44 pm

“[The little black boy] had seen Tarzan bring down a buck, just as Numa, the lion, might have done... Tibo had shuddered at the sight, but he had thrilled, too, and for the first time there entered his dull, Negroid mind a vague desire to emulate his savage foster parent. But Tibo, the little black boy, lacked the divine spark which had permitted Tarzan, the white boy, to benefit by his training in the ways of the fierce jungle. In imagination he was wanting, and imagination is but another name for super-intelligence.

Imagination it is which builds bridges, and cities, and empires. The beasts know it not, the blacks only a little, while to one in a hundred thousand of earth's dominant race it is given as a gift from heaven that man may not perish from the earth.”
― Edgar Rice Burroughs, Jungle Tales of Tarzan (Tarzan, #6)
farmerman
 
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Reply Wed 17 Aug, 2016 12:52 pm
@edgarblythe,
Hell, the Catholic Church was teaching "Special Evolution" wrt races until the 50's (1950's that is)

I have , in my collection of old HS texts, a series called "NEW CIVIC BIOLOGY" which discusses (going for a scientific manner of presentation). Incontrovertable proof of the ascendance of Humans by groups with the highest of them reserved for White Europeans.
This was a Biology text of the 1920's.

" What did we know and when did we know it" is a fascinating bit of research into Post Victorian Education in the US.

Im less a type who is asserting that we should have known about DNA' function shortly after someone discovered it in the late 800;s. Yesterdays truths and beliefs are hard to kill. Look at all these discussions e seem to voke re" Naturl Selection and being an "Evolutionist"
edgarblythe
 
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Reply Wed 17 Aug, 2016 12:54 pm
The vast majority of white Americans have always tolerated racism. But it's one thing to turn a blind eye, quite another to actively promote it.
farmerman
 
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Reply Wed 17 Aug, 2016 12:55 pm
@farmerman,
That does it!!
Im done reading "Merchant of Venice" or OThello to the grandkids
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farmerman
 
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Reply Wed 17 Aug, 2016 12:59 pm
@edgarblythe,
AHA, you are saying that Burroughs is actively promoting it in his writing. Im saying itd be hard to find, even in Lincoln's writings a hint of the time.

Im not saying I approve, Im just not going to top reading some stuff or enjoying some art wherever the bqckstory is repugnant to me.

Even some of the Hroic work that was to be intlled in Linz (by Hitler) ahs some artistic merit an should be lookd at with history at your elbow.

Ignoring it is kinda "PC on steroids"

HEAVENS, I may be turning conervative!!!

0 Replies
 
Finn dAbuzz
 
  0  
Reply Wed 17 Aug, 2016 02:03 pm
Well, I saw the movie and it was only so-so.

King Leopold was a thousand times the scumbag Burroughs could ever have been and the movie goes after him nicely, but too indirectly.

The Tarzan and John Carter books are pulp classics.

If you want to condemn them because of personal views of the author, then I would expect you to want to set fire to the movies of Roman Polansky and Woody Allen who are guilty of reprehensible actions and not just beliefs.
farmerman
 
  2  
Reply Wed 17 Aug, 2016 02:45 pm
@Finn dAbuzz,
Was Burroughs a racist and a white supremacist? the author of ERBDOM, a blog devoted to the writings of Rurroughs, disagrees with that < now popular< beleif that was pretty much begun by Linda Stasi, a "blogosphere critic"

He went and searched out various quotes from Burroughs work,


Quote:
Consider these passages and ask yourself — are these the words of a blatant racist with a white supremacy agenda?


The Return of Tarzan (1914)

It was now a beautiful, moonlit night. The air was crisp and invigorating. Behind them lay the interminable vista of the desert, dotted here and there with an occasional oasis. The date palms of the little fertile spot they had just left, and the circle of goatskin tents, stood out in sharp relief against the yellow sand—a phantom paradise upon a phantom sea. Before them rose the grim and silent mountains. Tarzan’s blood leaped in his veins. This was life! He looked down upon the girl beside him—a daughter of the desert walking across the face of a dead world with a son of the jungle. He smiled at the thought. He wished that he had had a sister, and that she had been like this girl. What a bully chum she would have been! (Chapter 10)

***

At dawn the hunters were off. There were fifty sleek, black warriors, and in their midst, lithe and active as a young forest god, strode Tarzan of the Apes, his brown skin contrasting oddly with the ebony of his companions. Except for color he was one of them. His ornaments and weapons were the same as theirs—he spoke their language—he laughed and joked with them, and leaped and shouted in the brief wild dance that preceded their departure from the village, to all intent and purpose a savage among savages. Nor, had he questioned himself, is it to be doubted that he would have admitted that he was far more closely allied to these people and their life than to the Parisian friends whose ways, apelike, he had successfully mimicked for a few short months. (Chapter 15)

The Lad and the Lion (1914)

Nor had the lionman’s perspicacity been one whit at fault in its estimate of the bronze maid of the desert. Far above the average of her sisters, was Nakhla-not only in personal beauty, but in virtue, goodness, character and intelligence as well. A girl in a thousand, was she-yes, in ten thousand, in whom race or complexion might bear no slightest place in the estimate that was her due. Nakhla of the Sahara was a daughter of the races. (Chapter 18)

Tarzan and the Jewels of Opar (1918)
In itself the hunt was a success, and ten days after its inauguration, a well-laden safari took up its return march toward the Waziri plain. Lord and Lady Greystoke with Basuli and Mugambi rode together at the head of the column, laughing and talking together in that easy familiarity which common interests and mutual respect breed between honest and intelligent men of any races.” (Chapter 24, “Home”)


Warlord of Mars (1919)
Twenty-two years before I had been cast, naked and a stranger, into this strange and savage world. The hand of every race and nation was raised in continual strife and warring against the men of every other land and color. Today, by the might of my sword and the loyalty of the friends my sword had made for me, black man and white, red man and green rubbed shoulders in peace and good-fellowship.(Ch.16)


Tarzan the Terrible (1921)

Tarzan smiled. Even here was the racial distinction between white man and black man—Ho-don and Waz-don. Not even the fact that they appeared to be equals in the matter of intelligence made any difference— one was white and one was black, and it was easy to see that the white considered himself superior to the other—one could see it in his quiet smile.

Apache Devil (1926)

Wichita Billings knew that the man at her side loved her. She knew that she was drawn to him more than to any other man that she had ever known, but she did not know that this attraction constituted love. Raised as she had been in an atmosphere of racial hatred, schooled in ignorance and bigotry by people who looked upon every race and nation, other than their own race and nation, as inferior, she could scarce believe it possible that she could give her love to an Indian; and so her mind argued against her heart that it was not love that she felt for him but some other emotion which should be suppressed. Shoz-Dijiji, on his part, realized the barrier that prejudice had erected between them and the difficulty that the white girl might have to surmount it in the event that she loved him. He, too, had faced a similar barrier in his hatred of the white race, but that his love had long since leveled. A greater obstacle, one which he could not again face, was the hurt that his pride had suffered when she had recoiled from his embrace.

Tarzan and the Leopard Men (1933)
She recalled the plaints of American Negroes that they were not treated with equality by the whites. Now that conditions were reversed, she could not see that the Negroes were more magnanimous than the whites. Evidently it all depended upon which was the more powerful and had nothing whatsoever to do with innate gentleness of spirit or charity.

Land of Terror (1944)
The men are monogamous and very proud of their bloodline. Under no circumstances will they mate with a white, as they consider the white race far inferior to theirs. I could never quite accustom myself to this reversal of the status of the two races from what I had always been accustomed to; but it really was not as difficult as it might appear, for I must admit that the blacks treated us with far greater toleration here than our dark-skinned races are accorded on the outer crust. Perhaps I was getting a lesson in true democracy.


Finn dAbuzz
 
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Reply Wed 17 Aug, 2016 02:55 pm
@farmerman,
I didn't buy that Burroughs was a racist, but if he was, it wouldn't necessarily have shocked me. However these quotes are fairly convincing that he wasn't.
0 Replies
 
edgarblythe
 
  2  
Reply Wed 17 Aug, 2016 03:51 pm
@farmerman,
I don't know how those quotes square with mine. It's like two different minds wrote them.
farmerman
 
  2  
Reply Wed 17 Aug, 2016 04:51 pm
@edgarblythe,
we take away what we want to believe. Burroughs wrote almost 8o novels, 27 alone were Tarzan doing something or other. So we can be damned sure that theres a lot of phrases and "stand alone" thoughts by the author.

Like the Bible, we can find almost anything that gells with our own worldviews.
I choose to accept that he lived in his time and everyso often would sneak a line in his stories that made you think .

At least he wasnt a drunken wife beater like Dickens




 

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