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French/German ethnic differences

 
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  2  
Reply Sun 11 Oct, 2015 02:53 am
@puzzledperson,
The Ewald originality came from Ireland.

Sorry, if it sounded that was no mixing. There had always been a mixing ... even among the smallest of the Saxon tribes.

I'm certain that many Germanic tribes came from Scandinavia - not only the Cimbri and Teuton came from northern 'Denmark' ...



puzzledperson
 
  -2  
Reply Sun 11 Oct, 2015 04:07 am
@Setanta,
The two Ewalds died in the late seventh century. The Danes under Ivar the Boneless occupied Northumbria in the mid-ninth century. Danes who earlier came to England were themselves Angles from Schleswig in southern Denmark, who in turn came from central European Germanic lands.

In old English, the Angles became Engle and gave their name to Englisc. The possessive form of Engle, Engla, gave rise to Engle land, the country that they occupied with the Saxons and Jutes, also Germanic invaders. This speaks for itself.

I never said that the Franks weren't in the north already, where they ruled the Romanized Celts.

As usual, Setanta makes irrelevant and erroneous comments, without comprehension of either the material he is replying to or of the material he parrots while attempting to sound educated, covering up his insecurity and manifold faults with fatuous ad hominem substituting for confidence.

I reply this time only because I didn't remember to log in to check messages and thus my ignore list wasn't activated.

Stop wasting my time with your frivolous mockery, Setanta. Stop hijacking my threads with your foolish, non-responsive, and personally insulting nonsense. I don't intend to put up with you and I will take whatever steps are needed to muzzle you, since you are a troll, not a legitimate participant. This is absolutely the last reply to you I intend to make -- here.


puzzledperson
 
  -2  
Reply Sun 11 Oct, 2015 04:27 am
@Walter Hinteler,
Thank you for your reply, Mr. Hinteler.

In fact, both Ewalds were natives of Northumbria; they were only schooled in Ireland.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Two_Ewalds

As for the Cimbri and the Teutons, there is substantial controversy as to whether they were Germanic or Celtic, as well as where they originated. The archaeological evidence for a migration from Jutland is lacking. See for instance:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cimbri
Setanta
 
  2  
Reply Sun 11 Oct, 2015 04:27 am
@puzzledperson,
You're wasting your own time if you say that you've put me on ignore, but then respond to my posts, so don't try to blame me for that. Angles, Jutes, Danes and Frisians all invaded what we call England beginning in the 5th century. Vortigern, who may be legendary, was said to have brought Hengist and Horsa to Britain, and they supposedly founded the kingdom of Cent.

The problem you have is that you treat all of this as though it were cut and dried, and that you can point to a certain era and a certain region and make concrete claims about who was living where. This is nonsense before the tenth century, and even then many claims are dubious.

But carry on with the sneers and the insults, they show your true character.
0 Replies
 
puzzledperson
 
  -2  
Reply Sun 11 Oct, 2015 04:38 am
@puzzledperson,
Whoops, that should read "Engla land".

Incidentally, the suggestion that England was never known as England, is really quite amusing, albeit inadvertently so. Of course its borders varied over the centuries, but I really shouldn't have to spell everything out in order to avoid misrepresentation by that driveling loon, that coarse and clumsy charlatan Setanta.
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Sun 11 Oct, 2015 04:43 am
@puzzledperson,
You really get off on the vicious remarks, don't you? I've got some news for you, Buster, i can post in any thread at this site, and there's nothing you can do about that. If you post bullshit, people are going to call you on it.
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  2  
Reply Sun 11 Oct, 2015 05:21 am
@puzzledperson,
puzzledperson wrote:
As for the Cimbri and the Teutons, there is substantial controversy as to whether they were Germanic or Celtic, as well as where they originated. The archaeological evidence for a migration from Jutland is lacking.
There is a lot of resistance shown by modern writers to believe that there could have been a large Celtic enclave among the Germanics.

0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  2  
Reply Sun 11 Oct, 2015 05:25 am
@puzzledperson,
I'm not just relying on Rolevinck's De laude veteris Saxsoniæ nunc Westphaliæ dictæ about the Ewalds. Here, we think that they might have learnt and studied many years in Ireland, but it would be more plausible that they were born there.


Edit: I only noticed now that you want to monologue here.

It seems, I've wasted my time responding here.
puzzledperson
 
  -1  
Reply Sun 11 Oct, 2015 10:27 am
@Walter Hinteler,
It isn't in the least important or relevant to my question whether the Ewalds were natives of Northumbria or Ireland, just as it isn't important or relevant to my question exactly which branch of the Franks conquered Gaul, when they first entered the north, or whether the Visigoths they displaced retreated to the south of France or all the way into Spain, or to what extent and exactly when.

The thread doesn't purport to be an exhaustive history of the region or to establish the antecedents of particular individuals such as the Ewalds. It asks whether the inhabitants of France came to be of roughly the same ethnic stock, in most of the country, and particularly outside the southern portion of what is now France, as the inhabitants of Germany in the general instance, by the time of the Treaty of Verdun which broke up Charlemagne's Frankish kingdom into the precursor dominions for what became France and Germany.

If you consider simple disagreement with you over points you insisted on raising, to be evidence of wanting to monologue, then your avatar showing a baby sucking its thumb is entirely appropriate. I was polite and respectful to you in all matters, Mr. Hinteler, because I hoped to encourage productive and useful feedback, as opposed to the diversion into belligerent arguments about matters that obscure the theme of discussion, and which were neither raised by me nor relevant to my question, as is invariably the practice of Setanta; but it seems that humouring you only encouraged you to take liberties.


Walter Hinteler
 
  2  
Reply Sun 11 Oct, 2015 10:33 am
@puzzledperson,
puzzledperson wrote:
your avatar showing a baby sucking its thumb
That's not "a baby" but me.

And I wasn't really sucking my thumb but getting teeth
http://i61.tinypic.com/352lxq8.jpg
puzzledperson
 
  -1  
Reply Sun 11 Oct, 2015 10:57 am
@Walter Hinteler,
It doesn't matter whether its a random baby or a particular one, or whether it's actually sucking its thumb or only appears to be. Please refrain from belaboring this bizarre tangent.
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Sun 11 Oct, 2015 11:02 am
Mr. Personality, the Charm School Dropout . . .
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  2  
Reply Sun 11 Oct, 2015 12:08 pm
@puzzledperson,
Actually, it does matter:
a) it's a photo showing me,
b) I correct your wrong description of it.

(And you certainly can see the French ethnic influence.)
puzzledperson
 
  -1  
Reply Sun 11 Oct, 2015 01:15 pm
@puzzledperson,
Incidentally, cutting edge DNA analysis appears to show that modern Europeans came from a migratory tribe originating in the Russian steppe, who moved to central then northern Europe and finally Scandinavia; and that Indo-European languages spread from Europe into India and Persia, not the other way around:

"Whether the sample was taken in Germany, Poland, Denmark or Sweden, we see the same component, and we can show that it comes from the Caucasus," says Allentoft."

http://sciencenordic.com/history-rewritten-europeans-were-%E2%80%9Cborn%E2%80%9D-bronze-age

This doesn't address my original question but it does bear on some of the broader issues subsequently raised. The question of subsequent ethno-cultural differentiation and migrations remains.
0 Replies
 
puzzledperson
 
  -1  
Reply Sun 11 Oct, 2015 01:50 pm
@Walter Hinteler,
I have only your undocumented statement asserting that the photo is "you" (what a fanciful concept!) and that thumbsucking is not involved. That scarcely counts as a correction.

Judging from the rather grainy photograph, the ethnic influence is Armenian, not French. Probably your family fled Turkish oppression at the end of the First World War, then invented a "French" background to fit in. You were never told the truth. The "teething" explanation was invented by your parents to spare you the humiliation of a thumbsucking habit that persisted into adolescence. You don't remember this because the repressed memories are too painful, and the electroshock therapy administered to break you of this habit disrupted your neural development. (A side effect of this can be found in strange, persistent delusions, such as the belief that St. Ewald was Irish; note the parallel act of transference, in which your own delusions about your "French" background are projected upon St. Ewald, whose national origin you also shift.)

Alternatively, the photograph is actually a picture of the child for which you were switched in the cradle by Gypsies passing through town in a traveling carnival. This would explain why you use a baby's photograph: a photograph of you as an adult would make the matter clear for all to see.

If you insist on being silly, so do I.
Walter Hinteler
 
  3  
Reply Sun 11 Oct, 2015 02:50 pm
@puzzledperson,
Cicero already said, qualis autem homo ipse esset, talem esse eius orationem. I just add: suum cuique.
puzzledperson
 
  -1  
Reply Tue 13 Oct, 2015 03:51 am
@Walter Hinteler,
Finkelstein might disagree with you.

I can't figure out why Germans love to dress themselves in that quote. Nobilitat stultum vestis honesta virum? Non vestimentum virum ornat, sed vir vestimentum.

Besides, Socrates said it: Cicero merely paraphrased it. Much the way that the photograph was "not a baby" but rather "you".

As for the +2 score on that comment of yours, I'm guessing that you and Setanta had something to do with it. Asinus asinum fricat.
Walter Hinteler
 
  2  
Reply Tue 13 Oct, 2015 03:56 am
@puzzledperson,
puzzledperson wrote:
Besides, Socrates said it: Cicero merely paraphrased it.
Sokrates didn't speak or write Latin.
puzzledperson
 
  -1  
Reply Tue 13 Oct, 2015 04:02 am
@Walter Hinteler,
But Cicero read Greek.

See also my previous comment: I added another paragraph at the end in edit.
Walter Hinteler
 
  3  
Reply Tue 13 Oct, 2015 05:06 am
@puzzledperson,
puzzledperson wrote:
But Cicero read Greek.
I quoted Cicero (here from Disputationes Tusculanae [liber V, 16]) not what he had read.
0 Replies
 
 

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