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What is the term for the use of two words of the same meaning consecutively?

 
 
Reply Mon 21 Sep, 2015 03:51 pm
I was listening to NPR the other day and it dawned on me after listening to the show that they are right - We use terms like that all the time.

example: safe-haven

both words mean the same thing. But they used a defining term for this that I can't remember.

Does anyone know this?

I tried a google search but it didn't yield the answer I was looking for. But the one example that stood out was safe haven. two words of the same meaning used in conjunction to describe something
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Type: Question • Score: 7 • Views: 1,545 • Replies: 17
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dalehileman
 
  1  
Reply Mon 21 Sep, 2015 04:15 pm
@invicta77,
Vic, have you tried "Reverse dictionary" in Onelook.com
invicta77
 
  1  
Reply Mon 21 Sep, 2015 04:28 pm
@dalehileman,
Been scouring it so far, and no avail. the closest thing that came up is pleonasm, but that doesn't fit the use of safe haven. where both words mean the same thing but are used together to make one word.

epexegesis kind of fits the bill but it didn't clarify much.
roger
 
  1  
Reply Mon 21 Sep, 2015 04:50 pm
@invicta77,
Does redundancy work?
dalehileman
 
  1  
Reply Tue 22 Sep, 2015 11:39 am
@invicta77,
Yea Vic, every so often I too spot a concept for which there's no word. Very frustrating at times
invicta77
 
  1  
Reply Sun 27 Sep, 2015 01:05 pm
@roger,
No bud =(

I hate not remembering things like this. I thought i would be able to find it just by remembering the last term they used.
invicta77
 
  1  
Reply Sun 27 Sep, 2015 01:06 pm
@dalehileman,
sadly this has an actual term, even the show host was taken back. I really wish i could remember this... I am not going to give up until i find the answer!
dalehileman
 
  0  
Reply Sun 27 Sep, 2015 01:17 pm
@invicta77,
Vic have you tried tautology

https://www.google.com/?gws_rd=ssl#q=two+words+that+mean+the+same+thing

http://onelook.com/?w=*&loc=revfp2&clue=consecutive+tautology
0 Replies
 
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Sun 27 Sep, 2015 01:31 pm
@invicta77,
invicta77 wrote:

sadly this has an actual term, even the show host was taken back.


are you saying that the show host was taken aback by the word/term?
0 Replies
 
roger
 
  2  
Reply Sun 27 Sep, 2015 03:55 pm
@invicta77,
Well, you might be able to sneak in 'tautology'. It doesn't really work, but maybe nobody will notice.

Oops! I missed man's post, but it still doesn't work.
0 Replies
 
firefly
 
  2  
Reply Mon 28 Sep, 2015 10:26 am
@invicta77,
I think you were correct with the word "pleonasm".
Quote:
Those are pleonasms — instances where there's a word or two more than necessary. A pleonasm is a type of redundancy, though not one in which the words mean exactly or nearly the same thing.
http://nhpr.org/post/please-dont-have-temper-tantrum-about-pleonasm-headline

Is the above link from the NPR program you were listening to?
dalehileman
 
  1  
Reply Mon 28 Sep, 2015 10:38 am
@firefly,
Fly I don't think pleonasm quite qualifies specificity

http://onelook.com/?w=pleonasm&ls=a
firefly
 
  2  
Reply Mon 28 Sep, 2015 12:56 pm
@dalehileman,
If this is the NPR program that invicta77 was listening to...
http://nhpr.org/post/please-dont-have-temper-tantrum-about-pleonasm-headline

I think that pleonasm is the word being sought.
dalehileman
 
  1  
Reply Mon 28 Sep, 2015 01:19 pm
@firefly,
Quote:
pleonasm is the word
Could be, Fly. Still however we can't help feeling there must be a better one
0 Replies
 
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Mon 28 Sep, 2015 01:29 pm
@firefly,
http://www.vocabulary.com/dictionary/pleonasm

Quote:
Pleonasm is using more words than you need to, either accidentally or deliberately.

An example of pleonasm? "She picked up the tiny little baby kitten."

The Greek root word in pleonasm is pleonazein, which describes something as more than enough. Used accidentally, a pleonasm is just long-winded wordiness, like a sentence that includes far more words than is necessary. Used on purpose, pleonasm is a tool used by writers and speakers to emphasize something or clarify an idea through repetition. This helps audiences remember main ideas as they listen or read.
dalehileman
 
  1  
Reply Mon 28 Sep, 2015 01:30 pm
@ehBeth,
Thanks Beth
0 Replies
 
InfraBlue
 
  1  
Reply Mon 28 Sep, 2015 01:34 pm
mark
0 Replies
 
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Mon 28 Sep, 2015 01:44 pm
@invicta77,
invicta77 wrote:
the closest thing that came up is pleonasm, but that doesn't fit the use of safe haven. where both words mean the same thing but are used together to make one word.


safe haven isn't one word

in some contexts, they become a phrase

in other contexts, they are two words with the same/similar meaning
0 Replies
 
 

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