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Sick rose bushes - any suggestions?

 
 
msolga
 
Reply Thu 24 Jun, 2004 08:18 pm
I planted some "hardy" hybrid roses last winter, which did pretty well till recently. They're supposed to be one of the more problem-free varieties.
Recently, however, they've developed a yellowing of the leaves & black spot ... probably as a result of the crazy weather lately - very dry, followed by deluges of rain, over & over ... followed by more of the same.

I've removed many of the offending leaves over the past couple of months, but the problem appears to be getting worse. Two of the bushes now have almost no leaves left. Confused

It's winter here & pruning time is soon. I'm wondering what to do: Do my roses sound seriously ill? Should I replace them or give them a good prune? And is there anything I can do about this situation that doesn't involve nasty poisonous sprays?

Any advice from "rose experts" would be most welcome. Smile

Thanks,
Olga
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Type: Discussion • Score: 1 • Views: 1,890 • Replies: 14
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jespah
 
  1  
Reply Fri 25 Jun, 2004 07:40 am
Hmm I'm no expert but I'd prune the hell outta the roses. The less dead weight the plant has to carry, the better. And, if this is some sort of an infection or infestation, you might be able to (no pun intended) nip it in the bud by clearing out as much of the yellow and black stuff.
0 Replies
 
gustavratzenhofer
 
  1  
Reply Fri 25 Jun, 2004 07:45 am
This might be a reach, msolga, because I'm not even sure if you have Black Walnut trees in Australia, but if you do, and they're near the rose bushes, that might be the problem.

The Black Walnut tree releases some sort of toxins throught the root systems, killing plants in the vicinity. Not all plants are effected, but if I remember correctly, the rose would be in jeopardy.
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littlek
 
  1  
Reply Fri 25 Jun, 2004 04:36 pm
MsOlga, here ya go.... look familiar?
http://ohioline.osu.edu/hyg-fact/3000/3072.html
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msolga
 
  1  
Reply Sat 26 Jun, 2004 12:11 am
Thank you for responding, jespah, Gus & littlek.

jespah: Yes, that was what my instinct was - chop the hell out of them! Evil or Very Mad But, as roses are new to me, I thought I should consult, first!

Gus, I don't think it's another tree or plant releasing toxins that's caused the problem. Nothing like that growing near them & they've been pretty healthy till now. I suspect it IS the crazy weather conditions.

littlek, I'm gonna have a good read of the information you sent me. Thank you! Very Happy
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Vivien
 
  1  
Reply Sat 26 Jun, 2004 02:49 am
I'd feed them well in Spring as well - one of my gardening books describes roses as 'gross feeders'
Shocked


I gave mine blood-fish-and-bone as well as the usual growmore this year and they are taking off like rockets and covered in flowers.

I'd asked the garden centre what i should use to perk up my chimney pots as i didn't want to change the soil and they suggested that - so i gave my 'best' plants some as well.

<that probably sounds weird - I've got several old Victorian chimney pots with flowers and stuff in on the patio>
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msolga
 
  1  
Reply Sat 26 Jun, 2004 04:32 am
Thanks for that, Vivien,

OK, they'll get a good feed in spring, then! Very Happy The trouble with using blood & bone is that Flatty tries to EAT it as I put it onto the soil. Shocked Then it's a race to work it into the soil, while pushing him away at the same time! Laughing It drives him into a frenzy! Me, too!

The Victorian chimney pots sound a charming idea! What do you have growing in them? Roses? Or something smaller?

OK, then .... Tomorrow I'm going to get outside & remove all the diseased leaves, collect all the ones that have fallen onto the soil & read up about rose pruning.
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Vivien
 
  1  
Reply Sat 26 Jun, 2004 04:29 pm
Laughing lovely image of you and flatty in the garden!

the chimney pots ...mmm one does have a rose in (new this year, the rose) a lovely apricot colour, several others have geraniums in various shades with trailers with tiny starry flowers in blues and mauves, another has a giant osteospermum - which i really have to split this autumn - another has a campsis in, another has a vinca, which trails out with evergreen leaves and small blue flowers and busy lizzies scattered about them.

Most of my garden has to have shady plants because with the high fences covered in climbers and buildings around it only gets sun for part of the day on each bit - except the patio - so all the sun lovers go in pots on the patio under the living room window.

If we don't have a severe winter the geraniums survive outside against the house and have a head start in Spring. they look tatty but pick up fast and grow huge.

Rose I'm afraid lurks behind one big pot doing her ornithology bit Rolling Eyes
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msolga
 
  1  
Reply Sat 26 Jun, 2004 10:46 pm
Vivien

You are a gardener, AS WELL! ... (as all your other talents! Surprised ) I'm so impressed! Very Happy

The good news is : My friend, "K of the green fingers", arrived today & expertly pruned my 3 little rose bushes & I found out about lime sulphur spray. <Big sigh of relief! Very Happy > So (apparently) everything is now under control! Very Happy

Thanks, all, for your advice!
0 Replies
 
Vivien
 
  1  
Reply Sun 27 Jun, 2004 02:17 am
not a gardener as in diggiing and weeding I'm afraid - i designed the garden to be so choc a bloc with plants so that weeds don't stand a chance! i like it looking natural and not regimented so the odd weed that comes through stays if it's pretty!

I love my garden and my plants though (it is only small). One of my students, who is an expert bonsai grower has just given me a bonsai as a 'thank you for teaching me to paint', i was really touched. It is a 10 year old scots pine and it's gorgeous. He's grown it from a baby.
0 Replies
 
Mr Stillwater
 
  1  
Reply Sun 27 Jun, 2004 02:22 am
Here's a clue

http://www.goodyearag.com/img/trackman/gehl.jpg

Hint: green concrete just needs a hose-down once a week.
0 Replies
 
Vivien
 
  1  
Reply Sun 27 Jun, 2004 02:29 am
Philistine! Laughing
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Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Sun 27 Jun, 2004 02:36 am
Well, I've decided, to use Mr. Stillwater's advice.

Part of, only: my four rose bushes will get a fair change to re-develop (used all those advice already since weeks).

But I do think, I'll plant something else there next instead (all the advice, gardeners gave me, ended: 'Well, since your roses are on a roof terrace/balcony, you certainly get everything bad which is in the air....').
0 Replies
 
margo
 
  1  
Reply Wed 30 Jun, 2004 02:56 am
Mr Stillwater wrote:
Here's a clue

Hint: green concrete just needs a hose-down once a week.


Oy! Stilly! Water restrictions. No hosing hard surfaces (both here and in Melbourne!)

In your case, it probably precludes washing your hair, too! Twisted Evil
0 Replies
 
msolga
 
  1  
Reply Wed 30 Jun, 2004 02:59 am
Laughing
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