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Checking Into a Hotel

 
 
Ragman
 
  3  
Fri 3 Apr, 2015 02:06 pm
@gollum,
Furthermore, in the USA here's more on that subject:
"Checking into a hotel anonymously and discreetly is an easy process. It may feel that you are doing something dishonest but wanting privacy and deceiving people are two separate issues. It is entirely legal to check into a hotel under a different name. The hotel may need confirmation of your actual identity but they will adhere to the name that you have registered in when booking your room. Whether you book your hotel by telephone, online or in person, it is possible to remain anonymous.

Read more : http://www.ehow.com/how_6960528_do-check-hotels-anonymously-discreetly_.html"
0 Replies
 
roger
 
  2  
Fri 3 Apr, 2015 02:11 pm
@layman,
You tell him, goddamit!
0 Replies
 
contrex
 
  1  
Fri 3 Apr, 2015 04:44 pm
I have to say, I am old enough, and posh enough, to still want to say "Checking into an hotel", and, at last, thankfully, old enough to not give a flying **** if anyone objects.
Butrflynet
 
  1  
Fri 3 Apr, 2015 05:12 pm
@gollum,
gollum wrote:

I read that Chelsea Clinton uses an assumed name to check into hotels.


Many celebrities and sports figures do, the paparazzi make it almost impossible for them not to do so.
0 Replies
 
layman
 
  1  
Fri 3 Apr, 2015 05:23 pm
@contrex,
Quote:
... "Checking into an hotel"...

I left my at at ome, ence I aint got no cover for my ead.

For them who aint knowin: There's 26 letters in the alphabet, not 25. There's one after "g" called "h," ya know?
contrex
 
  1  
Sat 4 Apr, 2015 12:42 am
@layman,
layman wrote:
There's 26 letters in the alphabet, not 25. There's one after "g" called "h," ya know?


This is not the Cockney dropped 'h'. There is a predilection for the phrase "an hotel" in the Queen's English when compared with the American usage (the Queen's English being the 'posh' (ie middle and upper class) dialect). In using the Queen's English, the "h" is pronounced when the word "hotel" is spoken exclusively, but dropped when speaking the phrase "an hotel" (i.e. "an hotel" is pronounced: an o-tel'). This predilection is not sui generis to the word "hotel:" polysyllabic words beginning with "h" (e.g. "historic" and "hypothesis") are similarly phrased (e.g. "an historic") in the Queen's English. 'Heir' likewise.

layman
 
  1  
Sat 4 Apr, 2015 12:55 am
@contrex,
Quote:
polysyllabic words beginning with "h" (e.g. "historic" and "hypothesis") are similarly phrased (e.g. "an historic") in the Queen's English. 'Heir' likewise.


Over here the "h" in heir is silent. As for "hypothesis, and the rest---well, it's a hypothesis, not an. We don't like queens over here. Not one bit.
roger
 
  1  
Sat 4 Apr, 2015 01:04 am
@layman,
Whatchu talking about? They got a whole borough of New York City.
contrex
 
  1  
Sat 4 Apr, 2015 01:31 am
@roger,
roger wrote:

Whatchu talking about? They got a whole borough of New York City.


And Queen Latifah as well.
0 Replies
 
 

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